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MAPS BULLETIN
MAPS Bulletin Summer 2014: Research Edition
 
Media > Recent and Archival
August 19, 2014

Univ. of Arizona Terminates ‘Pot for PTSD’ Researcher

By: Ryan Nerz

Fusion Live

Fusion Live interviews Dr. Sue Sisley about her planned study of medical marijuana for PTSD in veterans. Sisley speaks about the political climate surrounding marijuana research, her abrupt termination from the University of Arizona, and the importance of developing alternative treatments for PTSD through research with whole-plant marijuana. “Nobody is arguing that whole plant marijuana is a cure for PTSD, but it does seems to really reduce the severity of symptoms,” explains Sisley. “And many of our veterans are reporting that they have been able to successfully manage their PTSD symptoms and be able to be functional again.”


Originally appearing here.

After working for four years to win federal approval for a groundbreaking study on using marijuana to treat veterans with PTSD, Dr. Sue Sisley was abruptly terminated by the University of Arizona.

“My job evaluations were all excellent, so it was never an issue about job performance. It was clearly about the fact that I’m one of the most passionate, outspoken advocates for ending all the barriers to marijuana research,” Sisley told Fusion’s Chief Cannabis Correspondent, Ryan Nerz.

Sisley spoke about why marijuana might work for thousands of American veterans and the weird weed netherworld that is Arizona.

“Nobody is arguing that whole plant marijuana is a cure for PTSD, but it does seems to really reduce the severity of symptoms. And many of our veterans are reporting that they have been able to successfully manage their PTSD symptoms and be able to be functional again,” Sisley said.


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