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MAPS BULLETIN
MAPS Bulletin Spring 2014: Special Edition: Psychedelics and Education
 
Media > Recent and Archival
February 5, 2006

LSD for Cancer?


LSD for Cancer?
By George Walker

A year ago, I was diagnosed with rectal cancer. Fortunately, it was found fairly early, and I now appear to be free of any cancer. When I first discovered the condition, and began the quest for treatment, this favorable outcome was by no means assured. I started by asking for help from virtually all of my friends, sending an email to all my valuable contacts, and reading all I could find about all the possible ways of dealing with cancer. In my email letter I requested, among other inputs, some LSD 25. Due to our current drug laws, the only sources I know of for drugs such as LSD are the underground markets.

Why would I want LSD to treat cancer? In my many years of experience and experiments with various substances and mind states, I had seen quite a few seemingly miraculous results that included healing events that seemed to defy explanation, other than that the mind has amazing powers of healing. I had even seen broken bones that were healed almost instantaneously by individuals under the influence of LSD. In addition to the potential healing powers that might be awakened, I was aware of the need to maintain a positive state of mind. All of the literature I read seemed to emphasize the importance of this. On numerous occasions I have been able to utilize psychedelic drugs to re-program my mind and overcome periods of negativity and stress. I recognized cancer as not only a creator of potentially great stress and negative emotions, but also as a product of these mental states. So it seemed natural to me to try to utilize my best tools in order to achieve a favorable result, i. e., a body free of cancer. LSD has always been, for me, one of those tools, as it offers access to parts of the mind that are normally not available.

Fortunately, one of my friends turned up with the requested dose of street acid, not of the purity I would have preferred, but effective. I took a dose, and spent an evening meditating on what it was I needed to do. Beyond all the mundane activities, such as finding the right surgeon and scheduling my life around a few months of treatment and recovery, I realized that it was essential to maintain a positive attitude. LSD helped me realize that my episode with cancer could be a positive experience, and that I could avoid the standard mind-frame of battling cancer. After all, the cancer was not something external and foreign to me, it was a part of me, albeit a part gone wrong. Rather than seeing it as a fight, I undertook to correct the situation. Instead of a fight, it was a task, and one at which I could be successful. Im happy to report that, as of now, I am successful. So far, so good. Im also happy to report that using LSD was a great help in achieving the state of mind that made such positive thinking possible. And, as strange as it might seem, my episode with cancer was, on balance, a positive experience. It was a learning experience, and also gave me the opportunity for bonding with many friends as I worked my way through it. I even found inspiration for humor and self expression. Im not saying I couldnt or wouldnt have had such a favorable experience without LSD or other psychedelic drugs, but I firmly believe it would have been a great deal more difficult.

Would I recommend LSD to others diagnosed with cancer, or other life-threatening conditions? For those who are familiar and comfortable with its powers, absolutely yes. I feel a great deal of research needs to be done to explore the curative powers of the mind, and also of the power of psychedelic drugs to awaken those powers. For individuals who have never experienced such drugs, I would urge caution, and recommend the help of a qualified guide. These are very powerful agents, and could prove detrimental if negative mental states are allowed to prevail. But the potential is enormous, and society is remiss in not exploring further.


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