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MAPS Bulletin Summer 2014: Research Edition
 
Media > All Years Media
imageWelcome to MAPS’ media archives. On this page we post media articles that discuss psychedelic and marijuana research, political issues that affect MAPS and our research endeavors, and other media that is of interest to MAPS and the MAPS community. Below you will find articles that we've archived since 2000. If you would like to alert us to a news article that we should archive, email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Archived Media Articles by Year

contract 2014 Media Articles...


October 14, 2014


  Newsweek "Ecstasy and Acid in Your Medicine Cabinet? Doctors Explore Psychedelics" by Douglas Main.

Newsweek highlights the scientific, medical, and historical significance of psychedelics by reviewing presentations from the Horizons: Perspectives on Psychedelics 2014 conference in New York City. The article details MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Peter Gasser’s presentation about the results from MAPS’ study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy for anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness, and shares highlights from a panel discussion about psychedelic therapy featuring MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD study participant Nicholas Blackston and Acid Test author Tom Shroder. “Prohibitions seem to be loosening somewhat, with some governments allowing a small amount of research with psychedelic drugs, results of which show they may carry promise for treating a wide variety of ailments, from anxiety to addiction,” writes Douglas Main of Newsweek.


  WPSD (NBC 6 Kentucky) "Local Marine Finds Healing From PTSD Using Controversial, Psychedelic Therapy" by Briana Conner, Chad Darnall.

WPSD (NBC 6 Kentucky) interviews retired Marine Nicholas Blackston about how receiving MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in MAPS’ clinical study helped him overcome treatment-resistant posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Blackston speaks openly about his previous struggle coping with symptoms of PTSD, explains how the therapeutic use of MDMA helped him process his traumatic memories, and explains why he’s fighting to make MDMA-assisted psychotherapy legally available for people suffering from PTSD. “The MDMA removes the blockage of fear of wanting to deal with these issues. For me, I was able to realize this is the past,” says Blackston.



October 13, 2014


  The Doctors "MDMA-Assisted Therapy for PTSD"

The Doctors on CBS interviews Rachel Hope about how receiving MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in a MAPS study helped her overcome treatment-resistant PTSD. Hope describes how receiving MDMA as an adjunct to psychotherapy has eliminated her need for medications, highlights the lasting benefits that the treatment has brought to her life, and shares video footage of one of her MDMA-assisted psychotherapy sessions to illustrate her PTSD recovery process. Psychiatrist Julie Holland, MD, describes MDMA’s mechanisms of action, and Dr. Travis Stork discusses the possibility of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy becoming an accepted practice in the field of psychotherapy. “This is basically a catalyst that’s used during therapy. It makes the therapy go deeper, it goes faster, it’s much more comfortable,” says Holland. “It’s very different from any other anti-anxiety medicine.”



October 10, 2014


  MAPS "MAPS Opens Palo Alto Office with Presentation on Role of MDMA-Assisted Therapy in Mental Health Care"

On October 23, 2014, the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), a non-profit research and educational organization, will present a lecture on MDMA-assisted therapies to treat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety at its new satellite offices located at Sofia University in Palo Alto. Transforming Medicine: The Role of MDMA in Mental Health Care is an evening lecture by the originators of the therapeutic protocol behind MAPS’ clinical studies of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD.



October 9, 2014


  Chemistry World "MDMA" by Hayley Simon.

Chemistry World analyzes the history of MDMA from a chemistry-oriented perspective, detailing the substance’s role in science, therapy, and culture. The article highlights research into the risks and benefits of MDMA, featuring an overview of MAPS’ clinical research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treatment-resistant posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). “From a chemist’s point of view, MDMA does not look like a complicated molecule. But behind its relatively simple structure is a complex sociological history,” writes Hayley Simon of Chemistry World.


  New Scientist "LSD’s Ability To Make Minds Malleable Revisited" by Kevin Franciotti.

New Scientist reports on the publication of a study conducted by Robin Carhart-Harris, PhD, and David Nutt, MD, at Imperial College London investigating the relationship between LSD and suggestibility. The article describes how early LSD research inspired current studies, details how the study protocol was implemented, and explores how future studies will focus on the benefits of using LSD as an adjunct to psychotherapy. “The mind on LSD is easily able to make connections between ideas and thoughts,” explains MAPS-sponsored LSD researcher Peter Gasser, MD.



October 4, 2014


  The Guardian "Healing Trip: How Psychedelic Drugs Could Help Treat Depression" by David Derbyshire.

The Guardian reports on clinical research into the therapeutic use of LSD, MDMA, psilocybin, and marijuana as treatments for a variety of medical conditions. The article makes a strong case for psychedelic research by highlighting results indicating that psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy can help people suffering from PTSD, depression, anxiety, and addiction. “These drugs are powerful and the therapeutic model we are going to adhere to is quite specific in that it emphasises that the drug needs to be taken in the right environment and with the right support,” explains Robin Carhart-Harris, Ph.D.



October 2, 2014


  Drug Policy Alliance "Grieving Mother Launches Campaign to Make Music Events Safer" by Stefanie Jones.

The Drug Policy Alliance highlights an initiative to promote improved harm reduction measures at music venues through proposed amendments to the 2003 Illicit Drug Anti-Proliferation Act (a.k.a. the RAVE Act) legislation. Dede Goldsmith has launched a petition to amend the RAVE Act in response to the death of her daughter, Shelley Goldsmith, who died after taking MDMA at a venue that did not provide harm reduction measures.


  The Diane Rehm Show "Using Psychedelic Drugs To Treat Mental Disorders" by Diane Rehm.

The Diane Rehm Show on NPR features a special segment on psychedelic therapy research, featuring Acid Test author Tom Shroder, neuroethicist Dr. James Giordano, MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) researcher Dr. Michael Mithoefer, and study participant Nicholas Blackston. During the hour-long discussion, Dr. Mithoefer discusses the results from MAPS’ pilot and long-term follow-up studies of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD, Blackston describes his personal experience of overcoming PTSD after receiving MDMA as an adjunct to psychotherapy in a clinical study, and Shroder talks about his own process investigating the history of psychedelic research while writing Acid Test. “They’re doing Indiegogo campaigns to raise tens of thousands of dollars when the Pentagon has enough money in its couch cushions to fund this research,” explains Shroder.



September 28, 2014


  Las Vegas Review-Journal "UNLV’s Next Big Recruit Could be Pot Researcher" by Arnold M. Knightly.

Las Vegas Review-Journal announces that Nevada’s lawmakers are expressing interest in having the University of Las Vegas (UNLV) serve as the study location for part of MAPS and Dr. Sue Sisley’s FDA-approved study of medical marijuana for PTSD in veterans. The article describes the various obstacles surmounted by researchers involved with the marijuana study and highlights why Sisley is inspired to study medical marijuana for PTSD. “This type of research is certainly good research to be looking at inside the university,” explains Thomas Piechota, UNLV’s vice president for research and economic development. “There’s so much unknown in terms of the effects of medical marijuana on these types of issues.”



September 26, 2014


  Reality Sandwich "Rick Doblin: Hippie of the Year" by Tom Shroder.

Reality Sandwich features an excerpt from Tom Shroder’s new book, Acid Test, highlighting how MAPS Founder Rick Doblin began his career-long work to complete the research necessary to make MDMA-assisted psychotherapy into a prescription treatment. The article details Doblin’s initial efforts to study psychedelics, describes Doblin’s long-term follow-up of Walter Pahnke’s “Good Friday” psilocybin experiment, and recounts Doblin’s work to receive a Ph.D. from John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. Doblin had the goal to “remake himself into someone who could research psychedelic medicine with the sober caution that would be required if it had any chance of ever winning FDA approval,” writes Shroder.


  MAPS "MAPS Founder Rick Doblin’s Message for SSDP2014 Conference Attendees" by Rick Doblin.

MAPS Founder Rick Doblin speaks about the increase in opportunities for students to pursue the field of psychedelic science during his video message for the Students for Sensible Drug Policy 2014 Conference.



September 25, 2014


  Arizona News Channel 12 "Veterans Speak in Support Medical-Marijuana Researcher"

Arizona News Channel 12 features coverage of the Arizona Board of Regents meeting on Thursday, September 25, highlighting presentations from veterans and medical marijuana advocates who traveled from around the country to voice their support for Dr. Sue Sisley’s study of marijuana for PTSD. The report notes the various reasons why veterans are passionate about developing alternative PTSD treatments, highlights the public petition on Change.org that received over 110,000 signatures in support of Sisley’s marijuana study, and explores how the study may move forward. “I think [Arizona State University] President Crow was really struck by the appeals that were made today,” explains ASU spokesman Kevin Galvin. “I think it’s fair to say it’s an idea we’re exploring.”


  Arizona Daily Wildcat "Veterans Voice Concerns Over Sisley Dismissal at Regents Meeting" by Meghan Fernandez.

The Arizona Daily Wildcat reports on veterans and medical marijuana advocates speaking in favor of Dr. Sue Sisley’s FDA-approved study of marijuana for PTSD during the Arizona Board of Regents meeting on Thursday, September 25. The article reviews statements presented at the meeting about how medical marijuana can help people manage symptoms of PTSD, and how to move forward with marijuana research in Arizona.


  Arizona Board of Regents "Veterans Speak in Favor of Marijuana for PTSD Research"

Veteran Ricardo Pereyda and veteran Sean Kiernan speak during the Arizona Board of Regents meeting on September 25, 2014 about why they support MAPS and Dr. Sue Sisley’s FDA-approved study of marijuana for PTSD.



September 24, 2014


  Arizona Daily Wildcat "Sisley Confirms Marijuana Research Relocated" by Ariella Noth.

The Arizona Daily Wildcat announces that MAPS and Dr. Sue Sisley’s FDA-approved study of marijuana for symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans will be conducted in three separate study locations. The article details MAPS and Sisley’s work to find a location for the study and notes that policy makers in Nevada are showing interest in hosting whole-plant marijuana research in their state.



September 22, 2014


  HuffPost Live "How Ecstasy Might Help Treat PTSD and Other Illness" by Alyona Minkovski.

HuffPost Live interviews Acid Test author Tom Shroder about research into the benefits of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD.  Shroder discusses the origins of psychedelic-assisted therapy, contextualizes how government restrictions on psychedelics affect the advancement of medicine, and highlights published study results from MAPS’ research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as treatment for PTSD. “After just a handful of treatments, their PTSD symptoms are dramatically reduced or even gone,” reports Shroder.


  Psychology Today "A Drug More “Dangerous” Than Roadside Bombs?" by Tom Shroder.

Acid Test author Tom Shroder writes for Psychology Today about how government funding of research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD could lead to a reduction of PTSD in the U.S. Shroder illustrates how the lack of an effective treatment for PTSD negatively contributes to the lives of veterans and their families, and recalls how a military officer told him that MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD is not safe enough to explore as a treatment option. “The military leadership, those who control the $718 billion spent on defense last year, has not spent a dime on the single most promising treatment for PTSD now in development. Why?” asks Shroder.



September 21, 2014


  Salon "The Colossal Government Failure That Obstructed A Potentially Major Medical Breakthrough" by Tom Shroder.

Salon features an excerpt about MDMA research from Acid Test, the new book by award-winning journalist Tom Shroder. The article chronicles the discovery of MDMA and its initial uses in therapy, describes a series of government obstacles that obstructed MDMA research for many years, and reviews the history of MAPS’ clinical research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. “The theory was that MDMA’s apparent ability to enhance memory, diminish fear and promote patient therapist bonding would match up perfectly with the pathology of PTSD,” explains Shroder.



September 17, 2014


  Tucson Weekly "Arizona Wanted" by Mari Herreras.

Tucson Weekly reports new details about MAPS and Dr. Sue Sisley’s efforts to find a location for our FDA-approved study of medical marijuana for PTSD in veterans. The article describes developments about where the study will be located, highlighting the possibility of conducting part of the study in Colorado, which legalized marijuana for recreational purposes last year. “Sisley said the reception in Colorado has been so different from the fear and rejection she’s experienced in Arizona,” reports Mari Herreras of Tucson Weekly.



September 16, 2014


  Intellectual Gentleman’s Club "Intellectual Gentlemen’s Club Interviews Brad Burge" by Jason Abbott.

The Intellectual Gentleman’s Club Podcast interviews Brad Burge about the success of MAPS’ Legalizing Psychedelic Therapy crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo. Burge speaks about MAPS’ current psychedelic and marijuana research program, highlights the various accomplishments of MAPS’ crowdfunding efforts, and details the results and progress of MAPS’ clinical research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. “The MDMA is making those other types of psychotherapy more effective by reducing fear and enhancing empathy,” explains Burge. “It’s not just some kind of magic bullet where that’s in the MDMA that cures people—it’s using MDMA to facilitate these existing evidence-based forms of psychotherapy.”


  Psychology Today "Does MDMA Have Psychotherapeutic Potential?" by Constance Scharff, Ph.D..

Addiction treatment researcher Constance Scharff, Ph.D., writes for Psychology Today about clinical research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). “There is evidence once again that drugs like MDMA may have important psychotherapeutic uses when given in controlled medical settings,” explains Constance Scharff, Ph.D.



September 15, 2014


  CNN "Psychedelic Medicine Gets a Closer Look" by Sanjay Gupta, M.D..

CNN chief medical correspondent Sanjay Gupta, M.D, interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin, Ph.D., and Acid Test author Tom Shroder about past and present research into the benefits of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy. The interview focuses on how current clinical research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics is conducted, the diminishing stigma surrounding psychedelics, and how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can help people overcome PTSD. “Almost from the day of its discovery, psychiatrists have been fascinated by the properties of LSD and similar drugs, often called psychedelics,” explains Gupta.


  KPCC "Psychedelic Science: From 60s Counterculture to Modern Medicine?" by Stephanie O'Neill.

Stephanie O’Neill of KPCC interviews leading psychedelic researchers about current research into the scientific and medical potential of psychedelics. Psychedelic researchers Charles Grob, M.D., David Nichols, Ph.D., and Stephen Ross, M.D., are interviewed about the positive shift in public perception about psychedelics, the obstacles surrounding the initiation of psychedelic research, and the promising results from clinical research into psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy.



September 11, 2014


  Washington Post "Book Review: ‘Acid Test,’ On Psychedelic Drug Therapy For PTSD, By Tom Shroder" by Gregory Crouch.

West Point graduate Gregory Crouch writes for the Washington Post about Acid Test: LSD, Ecstasy, and the Power to Heal, the new book about psychedelic therapy by former Washington Post Magazine editor Tom Shroder. “’Acid Test’ makes a convincing case that such therapies ought to be prescribable by all practicing psychiatrists,” writes Gregory Crouch. “It’s hard to imagine how our society can afford to ignore the powerful healing potential contained in such profoundly psychoactive drugs as LSD and MDMA. Even more compelling is the moral debt we owe the PTSD-afflicted men and women who volunteered to fight our terrible wars.”


  Psychology Today "Smoke It Again, Abram" by Tom Shroder.

Acid Test author Tom Shroder writes for Psychology Today about research into the benefits of psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy for smoking cessation.


  AlterNet "How to Learn How to Help People on Psychedelic Trips" by April M. Short.

April Short of AlterNet highlights MAPS’ Zendo Project psychedelic harm reduction program, a service where trained volunteers travel around the world to provide compassionate care for people undergoing difficult psychedelic experiences. The article features an interview with MAPS Director of Harm Reduction Linnae Ponté about training Zendo Project volunteers, and how psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy research and harm reduction mutually inform one another. “I think people who are in training to be psychedelic therapists need more experience working with the difficult parts of the experience,” Ponté explains.


  Pitchfork "Safe From Harm: Drugs and Festival Culture" by Molly Beauchemin.

Pitchfork explains how the implementation of harm reduction services at large-scale music events can help reduce the risks of recreational drug use. The article interviews harm reduction advocates about the various ways that music events can improve safety for attendees, placing an emphasis on the elimination of zero tolerance policies, offering fact-based drug education, and repositioning drug use as a public health issue instead of a criminal issue. “Ultimately, harm reduction is about spreading awareness and destigmatizing an issue that is taboo despite its ubiquity,” explains Molly Beauchemin. “Promoting awareness is not an endorsement of recklessness: it’s a courtesy that saves lives.”



September 10, 2014


  Phoenix New Times "Weeded Out: How the U of A Fired Pot Researcher Sue Sisley After a State Senator Complained" by Ray Stern.

Phoenix New Times profiles marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, highlighting her determination to investigate new treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) through marijuana research. The article details Sisley’s progress toward initiating MAPS’ planned study of marijuana for PTSD in veterans, explains why Sisley’s termination from the University of Arizona received national media attention, and features an interview with Sisley about why she is passionate about conducting objective scientific research.



September 9, 2014


  GOOD Magazine "How MDMA Affects Empathy" by Andrew Price.

GOOD Magazine takes a look at the potential benefits of MDMA, highlighting clinical research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD and a study of how MDMA affects empathy. The article reviews MAPS’ research into MDMA-assisted therapy for various conditions and features an interview with researcher Dr. Gillinder Bedi about the varying effects that MDMA has on cognitive empathy and affective empathy. “Reducing cognitive empathy and turning down the volume on fear could actually be part of what makes MDMA effective as a therapeutic adjunct for traumatized or severely anxious patients,” writes Andrew Price of GOOD Magazine.


  Arizona Daily Wildcat "Former UA Professor Looks For New Place To Conduct Research" by Ariella Noth.

The Arizona Daily Wildcat updates readers on the current status of MAPS and marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley’s work to initiate an FDA-approved study of marijuana for PTSD in veterans. Sisley reveals why she is passionate about searching for a more effective treatment for PTSD, and offers news about the progression of the marijuana study. “My sponsor [MAPS] and myself will be taking the study to a more welcoming environment where we can conduct the research without the suppression we experienced at the University of Arizona,” explains Sisley.


  The Atlantic "‘Apparently Useless’: The Accidental Discovery of LSD" by Tom Shroder.

Acid Test author Tom Shroder writes for The Atlantic about psychedelic chemist Albert Hofmann’s discovery of LSD. The article details the experiments leading up to Hofmann’s first synthesis of LSD, recounts the first-ever human experiences with LSD, and shares how Hofmann’s LSD experiences helped influence his perspective about the potential of psychedelics.



September 8, 2014


  The Daily Beast "Psychedelics Are Ready for a Comeback" by Abby Haglage.

The Daily Beast interviews award-winning journalist Tom Shroder about his new book, Acid Test: LSD, Ecstasy, and the Power to Heal. Shroder speaks about how writing Acid Test helped him fully understand the therapeutic potential of psychedelics, how psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy can be more effective than currently approved prescription treatments, and how the stigma surrounding psychedelic research is withering away. “The Defense Department and Veterans Affairs have yet to spend a dime helping to further this research. If they got behind this and said ‘Hey, this is pocket change for us’ and the FDA put it on the fast track, this could be done in a fraction of the time,” explains Shroder. “Hundreds of thousands of lives could be saved.”


  Collective Evolution "New Study Uses MDMA To Treat Social Anxiety In Autistic People" by Jeff Roberts.

Collective Evolution features an overview of MAPS’ new study of MDMA-assisted therapy to treat social anxiety in autistic adults. The article describes the history of MDMA’s use in therapeutic contexts, summarizes researchers’ perspectives about why MDMA-assisted therapy may help alleviate social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum, and highlights future avenues for psychedelic research. “These are exciting times indeed, with the latest push to explore the promising therapeutic and medicinal benefits of various plants and psychedelics such as cannabis, LSD, ayahuasca, ibogaine, MDMA, and more,” explains Jeff Roberts of Collective Evolution.



September 6, 2014


  Psychology Today "A New Kind of Acid Test" by Tom Shroder.

Acid Test author Tom Shroder writes for Psychology Today about clinical research into psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy to treat depression, alcoholism, anxiety, and PTSD. Shroder describes the promising results from initial psychedelic research in the 1950s and 1960s, and reveals how psychedelic therapy went from being a legitimate field to an underground movement and back again. “The cost to the American taxpayer of giving these vets the medical care they’ve earned will be in the range of a trillion dollars over the next 30 or 40 years,” says Shroder. “If PTSD could be reliably cured with a short-term treatment using an inexpensive drug like MDMA, those costs could be slashed dramatically.”



September 5, 2014


  Mind Unleashed "Is it Time to Legalize Psychedelic Medicines for Therapeutic Use?" by Dr. Kelly Neff.

The Mind Unleashed blog reports on growing public support for research into the benefits of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy. The article explores current psychedelic research, investigates legal treatment models for psychedelic therapy, and highlights the success of MAPS’ Legalizing Psychedelic Therapy crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo. “Research into psychedelic medicine is truly becoming a global phenomenon,” writes Dr. Kelly Neff.


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Dallas Event: Treating PTSD with MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy"

MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) researchers Michael Mithoefer, M.D., and Annie Mithoefer, B.S.N., will speak in Dallas on September 8, 2014.



September 4, 2014


  Ozy "Rick Doblin Wants to Heal Anguish With Ecstasy" by Melissa Pandika.

Ozy interviews MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin about the current state of MAPS’ psychedelic research program, highlighting the progress of clinical research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. The article profiles Doblin’s history with psychedelic research, describes the results from MAPS’ completed MDMA studies, and features an overview of Doblin’s plan to develop MDMA-assisted psychotherapy into an FDA-approved treatment for PTSD. “It looks like there’s a realistic chance we can do it,” says Doblin.


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Legalizing Psychedelic Therapy Crowdfunding Campaign Exceeds $50,000 Goal in 16 Days"

On August 11, the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) launched its boldest crowdfunding campaign yet. In just 16 days, the Legalizing Psychedelic Therapy campaign on Indiegogo reached its ambitious $50,000 goal to complete funding for the world’s largest-ever clinical trial of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The campaign, which has already raised over $75,000 from more than 940 funders, continues through September 25.



September 2, 2014


  The Guardian "A Brief History of Psychedelic Psychiatry" by Mo Costandi.

The Guardian summarizes the past and present use of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy to treat a variety of medical conditions. The article features promising study results from early research into the use of LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat alcoholism, highlights the recent results of MAPS’ clinical study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy for anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness, and details how psychedelic therapy has helped thousands of people recover from serious medical conditions. “Between the years of 1950 and 1965, some 40,000 patients had been prescribed one form of LSD therapy or another as treatment for neurosis, schizophrenia, and psychopathy,” The Guardian reports.



September 1, 2014


  The Psychologist "A Brave New World for Psychology?" by British Psychological Society.

The British Psychological Society’s new special issue of The Psychologist features a collection of articles from leading psychedelic researchers about the benefits of integrating psychedelics into science, medicine, and art.


  The Daily Beast "Another Hazy Week For Weed" by Abby Haglage.

The Daily Beast analyzes current marijuana research, highlighting recently published observational study results indicating that marijuana may help slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, reduce opiate-related overdoses, and lower the rate of domestic crime. The article discusses the political obstacles surrounding the initiation of MAPS’ planned clinical study of marijuana for PTSD, noting that clinical research is needed to sway public and political opinions regarding the scientific validity of marijuana’s therapeutic potential. When you try to get it rescheduled, the feds say you need evidence to do so,” says Amanda Reiman of the Drug Policy Alliance. “But how can you perform that evidence when you’re not allowed to test it? It’s a Catch-22.”



August 29, 2014


  Reset.Me "Psilocybin and MDMA Therapy Explained by Dr. Alicia Danforth" by Amber Lyon.

MDMA and psilocybin researcher Alicia Danforth, Ph.D., talks with Amber Lyon of Reset.Me about her past and ongoing research using psychedelics to increase the effectiveness of therapy for anxiety-related conditions. Danforth highlights her current work as a researcher for MAPS’ new study of MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in autistic adults and provides updates. about the study.



August 28, 2014


  Substance "Graphic: All the Reasons Why Medical Psychedelics Could Be Around the Corner" by Samantha Felix.

Substance educates their audience about current clinical research into psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, highlighting a graph detailing the variety of medical conditions that may benefit from therapeutic applications of psychedelics.



August 26, 2014


  SF Weekly "MDMA, M.D.: MDMA Heals Veterans’ PTSD. Now It’s Got to Find a Way Into Pharmacies" by Chris Roberts.

SF Weekly covers the past, present, and future of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. The article explains why funding remains the biggest challenge for researchers interested in the beneficial uses of psychedelics, and looks forward to when psychedelic therapy is a legally available treatment.



August 19, 2014


  Fusion Live "Univ. of Arizona Terminates ‘Pot for PTSD’ Researcher" by Ryan Nerz.

Fusion Live interviews Dr. Sue Sisley about her planned study of medical marijuana for PTSD in veterans. Sisley speaks about the political climate surrounding marijuana research, her abrupt termination from the University of Arizona, and the importance of developing alternative treatments for PTSD through research with whole-plant marijuana. “Nobody is arguing that whole plant marijuana is a cure for PTSD, but it does seems to really reduce the severity of symptoms,” explains Sisley. “And many of our veterans are reporting that they have been able to successfully manage their PTSD symptoms and be able to be functional again.”


  Cannabis Radio News "MAPS Raising Money for PTSD Research"

Cannabis Radio News interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about current research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics and marijuana,  how scientific research is reducing the stigma surrounding psychedelics, and the inspiring momentum of MAPS’ Legalizing Psychedelic Therapy crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo. “It looks like we are going to be able to reach our goal, and maybe, if we get enough support, go beyond it,” explains Burge. “I think it’s a major step forward for public education about what these substances are and can do.”



August 18, 2014


  Here and Now "As Pot Laws Relax, Restrictions On Research Still Tight" by Jeremy Hobson.

Here and Now interviews Dr. Sue Sisley about her planned FDA-approved study of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).



August 14, 2014


  Scientific American "Psychedelic Drugs Hold Medical Promise" by Roni Jacobson.

Scientific American writes about how the resurgence of research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics is helping scientists develop new treatments for PTSD, anxiety, depression, OCD, and addiction. Roni Jacobson of Scientific American declares that “Psychedelic drugs are poised to be the next major breakthrough in mental health care.” The article provides details about how the legal classification of psychedelics has hindered psychedelic research for decades, featuring perspective from MAPS and the Drug Policy Alliance about how psychedelic research can become more efficient by changing the way drugs are scheduled by the government.

Donate today to help make psychedelic therapy a legal treatment.



August 12, 2014


  Canada.com "Could MDMA Help Cure PTSD?" by Ashley Csanady.

Canada.com features an article about research into the therapeutic potential of MDMA, highlighting MAPS’ upcoming Canadian study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD. The article announces MAPS’ new Legalizing Psychedelic Therapy crowdfunding campaign, and interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about the potential public health benefits of increasing research into psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy to treat a variety of medical conditions. “There’s any number of lives that could have been saved if this was available previously,” Burge says. “We’d be 20 years advanced in our medical research and we could be using it in any number of ways.


  The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) "U. of Arizona Prof’s Marijuana Study Remains in Limbo" by Susan Kruth .

The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) reports on the current status of MAPS and Dr. Sue Sisley’s planned study of marijuana for PTSD, including an update about the continued controversy surrounding the University of Arizona’s decision to fire Sisley. The article reviews how political pressure influenced Sisley’s termination, and highlights mainstream media coverage of Sisley’s efforts to initiate marijuana research. “In short, UA’s actions are troubling—and are likely to be viewed by other professors as a signal that they should refrain from advocacy and research on controversial topics,” writes Susan Kruth of FIRE. “The allegations should be of great concern to those who value universities as places where innovative medical research can occur.”



August 11, 2014


  KJZZ "NAU Rejects Medical Marijuana Research Proposal" by Steve Shadley.

KJZZ reports on MAPS and Dr. Sue Sisley’s search for a new study location for our FDA-approved study of medical marijuana for PTSD, noting that Northern Arizona University has declined to host the study on their campus. The article explains the political situation surrounding Sisley’s termination from the University of Arizona. “Clearly all of these organizations in addition to these 100,000 people signing this petition and MAPS see Dr. Sisley as really the ideal investigator for the study and we’re not going to change the investigator simply because some conservative policy makers in Arizona decided they don’t like her political actions,”  says Brad Burge of MAPS.


  New York Magazine "The Government’s Psychedelic Research Ban Is an Expensive Disaster" by Maia Szalavitz.

New York Magazine explores research into psychedelics and marijuana as treatments for a variety of medical conditions. The publication explains the importance of eliminating barriers to research, stating, “Until we create a rational system for regulating these substances — one that is based on science, rather than laws created as a result of fears about race and immigration — we could be missing out on treatments for everything from Alzheimer’s to Autism.”



August 9, 2014


  The New York Times "Medical Marijuana Research Hits Wall of U.S. Law" by Serge F. Kovaleski.

The New York Times reports on federal barriers to marijuana drug development research in the United States, focusing on MAPS and Dr. Sue Sisley’s efforts to initiate a clinical study of medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 70 U.S. veterans. The article explains the evolution of government restrictions on marijuana research, and notes that marijuana research has received prominent support from Congressional Representatives and over 100,000 people who signed a petition to support Sisley’s being rehired by the University of Arizona, after she was fired for political reasons.

Serge F. Kovaleski of The New York Times also investigates the political pressures behind Dr. Sisley’s firing from the University of Arizona: “The State Senate president, Andrew Biggs, called the university’s chief lobbyist, Tim Bee, to complain that Dr. Sisley seemed to be lobbying too aggressively and inappropriately. ‘Tim said he would call me back after he found out more,’ Mr. Biggs said in an interview. ‘And then he did and told me, “This will not be a problem going forward.” ’ ”

MAPS and Dr. Sisley have been working since 2010 to initiate a study of the safety and effectiveness of whole plant marijuana, smoked or vaporized, for symptoms of PTSD in 70 veterans. We are now seeking a new location for the study within Arizona.

Help clear the political haze obstructing research into the beneficial uses of Schedule I drugs.


  The Toronto Star "Music Festivals Need Better Strategies For Party Drugs, Health Advocates Say" by Brian Platt.

The Toronto Star interviews harm reduction advocates about various methods that could improve safety standards for attendees at large-scale music events. “We need to discuss this not in a prohibition context, but an education context,” explains MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. “You will still end up with the fact that there are risks, but how do we, as a society, respond to that?”



August 5, 2014


  Arizona Daily Wildcat "Sisley Won’t Be Rehired At UA, PTSD Study Still on Hold" by Hannah Plotkin.

The Arizona Daily Wildcat investigates the developing situation surrounding marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley’s efforts to conduct an FDA-approved study of medical marijuana for PTSD in veterans in Arizona. The article details how the University of Arizona’s decision to terminate Sisley and deny her reinstatement appeal has inspired over 100,000 to sign a petition asking the Arizona Board of Regents to assist in the search for a new study location to conduct MAPS’ planned research. “With no more possibility for reinstatement at the University of Arizona, MAPS will move the research to another university where Dr. Sisley can continue to function as the Principal Investigator,” explains Brad Burge of MAPS.


  Baltimore Sun "Are Psychedelics the Next Medical Marijuana?" by Nate Greenslit.

The Baltimore Sun publishes an op-ed about what the growing cultural acceptance of psychedelic treatments has in common with the rise of medical marijuana in the United States. The article discusses how the recent resurgence in psychedelic research is developing new treatments for serious medical conditions, details how the recreational use of psychedelics within the counter-culture movement hindered early psychedelic research, and provides commentary about the future of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy.



August 4, 2014


  California Magazine "Goodbye to the Godfather of Psychedelics: Shulgin Now “Tripping in the Cosmos”" by Laura B. Childs.

California Magazine captures the experience of attending the memorial for renowned psychedelic researcher Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin, an event celebrating Shulgin’s life, knowledge, and research. Over 1,200 people gathered for the memorial in Berkeley, CA on August 2, 2014, including Shulgin’s family, friends, colleagues, and many others who have been inspired by his work to expand public knowledge about psychedelics.



August 3, 2014


  Vox "The Case for Medical LSD, Mushrooms, and Ecstasy" by German Lopez.

Vox reports on the resurgence of research into the medical potential of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, highlighting clinical studies investigating the therapeutic use of MDMA, LSD, and psilocybin for the treatment of anxiety, alcoholism, obsessive compulsive disorder, and addiction. The article notes how early psychedelic research has served as the inspiration and foundation for current psychedelic research, details the progress of current research, features a comprehensive interview with psychedelic researcher Dr. Charles Grob about past, present, and future psychedelic research. “It’s great to see that momentum is moving forward,” explains Grob. “I think we are going to be able to accomplish the goals that the earlier generations were not able to, by and large because the world we live in today is far more ready to handle the implication of research with psychedelic drugs.”



August 2, 2014


  The Los Angeles Daily News "UCLA Medical Researcher Studies Using Hallucinogenics, Ecstasy To Treat Autism" by Sandy Mazza.

The Los Angeles Daily News highlights MAPS’ new clinical study of MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum, now enrolling subjects at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute. The article details the methodology involved with conducting the study, notes the importance of creating a comfortable setting for study participants, and reviews various studies of the therapeutic potential of MDMA. “We’re looking for something to facilitate positive, ongoing change,” explains Principal Investigator Dr. Charles Grob. “You can’t take an autistic person and make them un-autistic, but you can treat the overwhelming social anxiety.”



July 31, 2014


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Petition to Reinstate Medical Marijuana Researcher Receives Over 100,000 Signatures"

A petition launched on Change.org by an Arizona veteran has gathered over 100,000 signatures in support of Dr. Sue Sisley’s efforts to initiate medical marijuana research in Arizona. Launched on July 10, the petition reached 100,000 signatures in just 21 days.



July 30, 2014


  AZ Daily Sun "Supporters of Former UA Med Pot Researcher Plan to Appeal to ABOR" by Howard Fischer Capitol Media Services.

The AZ Daily Sun highlights how MAPS, veterans, and other supporters of Dr. Sue Sisley’s marijuana research are asking the Arizona Board of Regents to help find a new location for the FDA-approved study of medical marijuana for PTSD in veterans. The article discusses the events surrounding Sisley’s termination from the University of Arizona, noting that her official appeal to be reinstated was rejected on July 28, 2014. “[MAPS] has said its money follows Sisley and will not be awarded even if the UA finds some other principal researcher,” writes Howard Fischer of Capitol Media Services.


  Associated Press "Fired Medical Marijuana Researcher Loses Appeal To Keep University Job"

The Associated Press reports that marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley’s appeal to be reinstated at the University of Arizona has been denied by the university. The article details Sisley’s work toward studying the effects of medical marijuana for PTSD in veterans and highlights her next steps toward initiating the FDA-approved research. “Sisley and her supporters will ask the Arizona Board of Regents to help her find a new home for the study. She is hoping to work with Arizona State University or Northern Arizona University,” explains the Associated Press.



July 29, 2014


  Military Times "Pot-for-PTSD Researcher Denied Reinstatement" by Patricia Kime.

Military Times reports that marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley’s appeal to be reinstated at the University of Arizona has been rejected, causing Sisley and MAPS to search for a new location to conduct our FDA-approved study of medical marijuana for PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans. The article discusses how political pressure may have influenced Sisley’s termination, highlights the online petition that has collected nearly 100,000 signatures in support of Sisley’s research, and looks at the future of MAPS’ planned medical marijuana study. “Dr. Sisley‘s primary focus is finding a safe and secure home in Arizona for this research,” explains MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. “Were it not for Dr. Sisley’s efforts, this research would not exist.”


  AZ Central "Fired U of A Marijuana Researcher Trying to Keep Study in AZ" by Brahm Resnik.

AZ Central features a report on medical marijuana for PTSD in veterans, highlighting MAPS and Dr. Sue Sisley’s planned study of marijuana for PTSD. The report explains that the study was planned to be conducted at the University of Arizona, though the University of Arizona’s decision to fire Dr. Sisley and reject her reinstatement appeal has resulted in MAPS and Sisley’s search for a new study location. “I’m focused on finding a home for this research,” explains Sisley. “I made a commitment to these veterans.”


  Arizona Public Media "Medical Marijuana for PTSD Study May Move From UA" by Zachary Ziegler.

Arizona Public Media highlights MAPS’ press release announcing that marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley and MAPS are in search of a new location to conduct their study into medical marijuana for PTSD. The article details how Sisley’s appeal to reverse her termination at the University of Arizona resulted was rejected on Monday, July 28, forcing the study to be moved away from the University of Arizona to a new location.


  CBS 5 Arizona "Marijuana Researcher Seeking Out Other Places to Do PTSD Study" by Jason Barry.

CBS 5 Arizona reports on the controversy surrounding the University of Arizona’s decision to fire marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, noting that the university has denied her appeal to be reinstated. The article features perspective about how political pressure may have affected Sisley’s termination, underscoring the need for fewer obstacles that prevent rigorous scientific research. “We have over a half million veterans living in Arizona, who have fought side by side with me to get this study to its precipice, where its finally ready to be implemented,” said Sisley. “I refuse to turn my back on these Vets.”


  NBC News "Pot Researcher Firing Unleashes Rising Veteran Backlash" by Bill Briggs.

NBC News reports that marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley’s appeal for reinstatement at the University of Arizona has been rejected by the university. The article details Sisley’s work to initiate an FDA-approved study of medical marijuana for PTSD in veterans, highlights how a petition to support Sisley’s research has reached nearly 100,000 signatures, and confirms that MAPS and Sisley are pursuing other locations where the study can be conducted. “It’s so sad that it requires political courage to do an FDA randomized control trial,” explains Sisley. “This isn’t like some stoner saying, ‘I want to do research.’ This involves blinded, independent investigators just trying to collect objective data.”


  CBS 5 Arizona "UA Denies Appeal of Medical Pot Researcher’s Firing" by Steve Stout and Colton Shone.

CBS 5 Arizona reports on the University of Arizona’s rejection of marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley’s appeal to be reinstated at the university. The article gives an overview of Sisley’s work to initiate an FDA-approved study of marijuana for PTSD and details the various political obstacles obstructing marijuana research. “If medical schools are forbidden from doing this, we’re really missing out in advances in medical science,” explains Dr. Richard Strand of the Arizona Wellness Chamber of Commerce.


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Dr. Sue Sisley Seeks New Study Location; UA Denies Appeal for Reinstatement"

On July 28, 2014, the University of Arizona denied Dr. Sue Sisley’s administrative appeal for reinstatement (view the letter).

Update (July 31, 2014): The Arizona Board of Regents has announced that the August 7 Executive Committee Meeting will not be open to the public. Contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) for more information.



July 25, 2014


  reddit "MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy Study Participant CJ Hardin Hosts Q&A on reddit" by CJ Hardin.

On July 25, 2014, former U.S. Army Sergeant and MDMA-assisted psychotherapy study participant CJ Hardin participated in an AMA (Ask Me Anything) session hosted on reddit. Hardin answered over 100 questions from the public about the benefits of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, the intensity of his combat experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan, and how his life has improved since overcoming PTSD.



July 23, 2014


  AZ Daily Sun "Study Head Threatens To Pull Funding Over Firings" by Howard Fischer Capitol Media Services.

AZ Daily Sun writes about the University of Arizona’s firing of marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley and the possibility that MAPS and Sisley will find an alternative location for their FDA-approved clinical study for PTSD in veterans. The article provides an overview of obstacles standing in the way of clinical research into the benefits of marijuana, and interviews MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin about the future of the study. “So long as the university obtains all the necessary approvals to comply with state and federal law and regulatory requirements, there is no policy in place that would preclude a different state university from conducting this research,” explains Katie Paquet of the Arizona Board of Regents.


  Arizona Public Media "Medical Marijuana for PTSD Study May Move from UA" by Maria Inés Taracena.

Arizona Public Media explores the next steps for MAPS and Dr. Sue Sisley’s planned study of marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in U.S. veterans while Dr. Sisley awaits the university’s response to her appeal. “We are not interested in working with other principal investigators that the university might propose to us, because they haven’t done the hard work for four years, like Sue has, to make the study happen,” said Rick Doblin, executive director and founder of MAPS.



July 22, 2014


  CBS 5 Arizona "Valley Veterans Rally To Support Marijuana Researcher" by Jason Barry.

CBS 5 Arizona highlights a press conference hosted by veterans and community leaders who gathered at the University of Arizona on July 22 to demand the reinstatement of Dr. Sue Sisley, the medical marijuana researcher recently fired by the university. The report describes the various efforts to appeal Sisley’s termination, addresses the political environment surrounding Sisley’s termination, and interviews prominent community members. “I am crestfallen and heartbroken that the university would impede this study as if we’re returning to the dark ages,” said former U.S. Attorney Mel McDonald.


  FOX 10 Phoenix "Vets Rally Behind Pot Researcher Set To Be Fired By the UofA" by Steve Krafft.

FOX 10 Phoenix reports on the July 22 gathering of veterans, activists, and community leaders at the University of Arizona to demonstrate their support for the reinstatement of marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, the principal investigator for MAPS’ planned study of marijuana for PTSD in veterans who was recently fired by the university. The report summarizes the circumstances surrounding Sisley’s termination, highlights the perspective of veterans in favor of medical marijuana research, and mentions that letters to appeal the decision were delivered to the Arizona State Board of Regents and the University of Arizona. “You are at a university; it should be about advancing science and understanding that to me is the key element of this,” explains U.S. Army veteran Sean Kiernan. “I think it is a black eye to the University of Arizona to be honest with you, and for her to get terminated and fired based on this study to me is un-American.”


   "Dr. Andrew Weil Asks University of Arizona to Reconsider Firing of Dr. Sue Sisley" by Andrew Weil, M.D..

On July 22, 2014, Andrew Weil, M.D., sent a letter to University of Arizona president Dr. Ann Weaver Hart to express his support for Dr. Sue Sisley, the medical marijuana researcher recently fired by the university after receiving approval to conduct MAPS-sponsored medical marijuana research for veterans with PTSD. Read Dr. Weil’s letter to President Hart



July 21, 2014


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Veterans Demand Reinstatement of Dr. Sue Sisley at University of Arizona on Tuesday"

On Tuesday, July 22, at 12:00 pm, a group of veterans will assemble at the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix to demand the reinstatement of Dr. Sue Sisley, which will enable FDA-approved research into medical marijuana for veterans with PTSD to continue at the University of Arizona. Media are invited to attend.


  Medscape "Psychiatrist Fired as ‘Payback’ for Marijuana Research?" by Deborah Brauser.

Medscape summarizes how the University of Arizona’s firing of marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley impacts FDA-approved research into marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in U.S. veterans. The article acknowledges growing support for Sisley’s reinstatement, citing mainstream media coverage on CNN and a public petition that has so far received over 33,000 signatures in support of Sisley. Sisley speaks about the political nature of her termination, the importance of developing alternative treatments for PTSD, and the next steps she will take to initiate clinical research into the benefits of medical marijuana. “My sponsor and I are prepared to fight, because this is a fight for scientific freedom. It’s not just about reinstating Sue Sisley. It’s a much larger issue,” explains Sisley.



July 18, 2014


  ABC 15 Arizona "Medical Marijuana Research For Vets Halted"

ABC 15 Arizona interviews marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley about her work toward initiating FDA-approved research into the potential benefits of medical marijuana for PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans.


  Associated Press "Professor Aims to Resume Research on Pot and PTSD" by Astrid Galvan.

The Associated Press reports new details about the University of Arizona’s decision to fire marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, the lead investigator for an FDA-approved study focusing on medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD in veterans. The article highlights various obstacles that have impeded the initiation of research into the potential benefits of marijuana, investigates anecdotal evidence suggesting marijuana is helping veterans manage symptoms of PTSD, and features an interview with Sisley about her perspective regarding her termination and the state of MAPS’ planned marijuana study. “Sisley says the battle is not over,” explains Astrid Galvan of the Associated Press. “She is asking the university to reinstate her. If she fails, she intends to try to get another university to take on the project.”



July 17, 2014


  AZ Central "Marijuana Researcher Appeals UA’s Firing" by Ken Alltucker.

AZ Central reports on the implications of the University of Arizona’s decision to fire marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, the lead investigator for MAPS’ planned study of marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in veterans. The article reveals how political pressure may have influenced Sisley’s termination, features an interview with Sisley about her official appeal to the university, and highlights how a public petition to reinstate Sisley has achieved over 31,000 signatures. “The main goal is to get me reinstated to conduct research that is so important to the veterans of this state,” explains Sisley. “I refuse to turn my back on these veterans, many who have stood shoulder to shoulder with me.”


  Tucson Weekly "Reefer Research Madness" by Mari Herreras.

Tucson Weekly gives an overview of the current controversy surrounding medical marijuana research in Arizona, featuring critical commentary about the University of Arizona’s decision to fire MAPS-sponsored marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley. Mari Herreras of Tucson Weekly highlights Sisley’s plans to continue working toward initiating MAPS’ FDA-approved clinical research into marijuana for PTSD, and provides needed perspective about how politics can influence the actions of universities by controlling schools’ budgets. “While her research has been delayed, veterans are dying,” explains Arizona veteran Ricardo Pereyda. “She’s advocating saving lives. Why would you rebuke her for that advocacy?”



July 16, 2014


  Charleston City Paper "Iraq Nearly Broke James Hardin. Ecstasy Is Helping Him Rebuild." by Paul Bowers.

In a cover story for the Charleston City Paper, North Carolina veteran James Hardin shares his experience receiving MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in a MAPS-sponsored trial. The article features a comprehensive overview of Hardin’s experience in the military, how posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affected his daily life, and how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy helped him overcome treatment-resistant PTSD. “It gave me that safety that I had not felt,” explains Hardin.



July 15, 2014


  Huffington Post "Petition To Reinstate Marijuana Scientist Gets Thousands of Signatures" by Matt Ferner.

The Huffington Post reports on the Change.org petition to support MAPS and Dr. Sue Sisley’s medical marijuana research in Arizona. The article provides background about Sisley’s termination and highlights the need for a more effective treatment for PTSD. “The university must reinstate Dr. Sisley, providing her with the necessary space and resources she needs to conduct her research,” wrote veteran Ricardo Pereyda, who created the petition. “Her study could mean life or death for many veterans. ‘Bigger Questions, Better Answers, Bear Down,’ is the Wildcat motto. Demand that President Hart and the University of Arizona live up to it.”



July 14, 2014


  VICE News "Meet the Researcher Who Was Fired After Trying to Give Weed to Veterans" by Samuel Oakford.

Medical marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley talks to VICE News about her work with veterans, why she was fired by the University of Arizona, and about her plans going forward. In the interview, Sisley speaks about MAPS’ planned study of marijuana for PTSD in veterans, stating, “It’s a triple-blind randomized controlled trial — it’s the most rigorous science you can conduct in the US. It would have answered tons of questions for the veterans and the general public.”


  Military Times "Researcher Leading PTSD-Pot Study Loses Job" by Patricia Kime.

Military Times highlights the work of marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, who was fired from the University of Arizona after working for more than four years to initiate MAPS’ planned study of marijuana for PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans. The article details Sisley’s dedicated work toward developing an alternative treatment for veterans suffering from PTSD, summarizes the study protocol, and reveals Sisley’s intentions to move the marijuana study to a new university if her reinstatement appeal is unsuccessful. “Dr. Sisley has a genuine passion for researching marijuana as a possible treatment for PTSD and a long track record providing clinical care to vets with PTSD,” explains MAPS Founder Rick Doblin in a letter to administrators at the University of Arizona.



July 12, 2014


  CNN "University Drops Marijuana Researcher" by Sanjay Gupta, M.D..

CNN chief medical correspondent Sanjay Gupta, M.D., speaks with Dr. Sue Sisley, the marijuana researcher recently fired by the University of Arizona, about why she was fired and what it could mean for MAPS’ planned, FDA-approved study of marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans.



July 11, 2014


  USA TODAY "Studies Ask Whether MDMA Can Cure PTSD" by Rachel Chason.

USA TODAY highlights how veteran Virgil Huston overcame PTSD after receiving MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in a clinical trial. “It wasn’t the MDMA that made him better, but the conversation that the drug facilitated,” explains Rachel Chason of USA TODAY.


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Letter from Rick Doblin to University of Arizona in Support of Dr. Sue Sisley"

On July 11, 2014, MAPS Founder Rick Doblin, Ph.D., wrote to Caroline Garcia, Associate Vice President for Research at the University of Arizona, to express MAPS’ support for Dr. Sue Sisley’s reinstatement at the university after she was fired on June 30. Dr. Sisley is the lead investigator of MAPS’ planned study of marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans.



July 10, 2014


  Tucson Weekly "Research Ruckus" by Brad Poole.

The Tucson Weekly reports that even with the University of Arizona’s firing of Dr. Sue Sisley, MAPS’ planned study of marijuana for veterans with PTSD will still go forward.



July 9, 2014


  CNN "5 Things You May Not Know About Post-Traumatic Stress" by Sara Cheshire.

CNN includes MDMA-assisted psychotherapy on its list of five things that might surprise you about posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While noting the various ways that traumatic events can affect people and their communities, the article highlights promising research into the use of MDMA as an adjunct to therapy as a treatment for PTSD. “We’re not just talking about finding moments of joy or spiritual awareness. The illegal drug MDMA, also know as Ecstasy or Molly, has been shown to help some individuals suffering from PTSD. Combined with therapy, it can assist in processing traumatic memories and change thought patterns surrounding traumatic events.”


  Al Jazeera America "University of Arizona Marijuana Researcher Fired Before Landmark Study" by Jacob Ward.

Al Jazeera America takes a look inside the firing of University of Arizona medical marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley.



July 7, 2014


  USA Today "Marijuana Study Backed By Feds Delayed After Researcher’s Firing" by Jolie Lee.

USA Today reports on the University of Arizona’s decision to fire marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, noting that Sisley believes her termination is the result of her political activism. The article highlights Sisley’s long path toward initiating MAPS’ planned research into the medical benefits of marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD in veterans, shares perspective from a University of Arizona representative regarding the political nature of Sisley’s termination, and explains the next steps necessary in order for Sisley’s FDA-approved marijuana research to be initiated. “We were on the cusp of finally implementing this study and helping veterans answer the question of what role marijuana can play in treating PTSD,” explains Sisley.



July 5, 2014


  AlterNet "5 Mind-Blowing Lessons from Psychedelics Experts" by April Short.

April Short of AlterNet reviews MAPS’ first online educational course, “Psychedelic Science: How to Apply What We’re Learning to Your Life,” a 5-session interactive collection of workshops hosted by Evolver Learning Lab that gathered prominent psychedelic researchers to reveal how insights from their research can be applied to people’s everyday lives in beneficial ways. The article features five notable lessons learned from the course, including overviews of harm reduction principles, research into the therapeutic use of MDMA, and how psychedelic research may help provide new treatments for a variety of serious medical conditions. “Since its founding in the ‘80s, MAPS has gathered a wealth of insight into the interactions between psychedelics and the human mind,” explains Short.



July 4, 2014


  Science "High Hopes | Can Ecstasy Treat The Agony of PTSD?" by Kai Kupferschmidt.

Science catalogues the reemergence of international research into the therapeutic use of psychedelics. The article details work conducted by MAPS to develop psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy into prescription treatment options for a variety of medical conditions, highlighting clinical research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy for anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness, ibogaine-assisted therapy for opiate addiction, and MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. “I believe in people’s basic human right to use molecules to explore their consciousness,” MAPS Founder Rick Doblin, Ph.D., tells Science.



July 1, 2014


  AZ Capitol Times "The Personnel Is The Political: Ua Marijuana Researcher Fired, Claims Political Motivation" by Evan Wyloge.

AZ Capitol Times reports that MAPS-sponsored marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley has been fired from her position at the University of Arizona. Sisley worked for years to receive approval from both the Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Health and Human Services to study the benefits of marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD in veterans, though now Sisley could face another delay due to her termination. Sisley speaks about the political connotations regarding her termination and reveals her personal thoughts about the university’s decision. “If there is some kind of behind-the-scenes string pulling going on that curtails educational freedom, that’s just unacceptable,” states Congressional Representative Ethan Orr. “I hope that’s not the case.”


  KJZZ "U of A Professor Claims She Was Fired Over Medical Marijuana Research" by Steve Shadley.

KJZZ broadcasts news of the firing of marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley from the University of Arizona. The radio segment shares details about Sisley’s dedicated work to initiate government-approved research into the benefits of marijuana for PTSD, provides context about the controversial political nature of Sisley’s termination, and features an interview with Sisley about her next steps toward conducting clinical research into the effects of medical marijuana.


  Your West Valley "Doctor Who Backs Wider Study Of Medical Marijuana Let Go by UofA" by Howard Fischer Capitol Media Services.

Your West Valley writes about the political climate surrounding medical marijuana research in Arizona, noting that MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley has been fired from the University of Arizona without a given reason. The article features an interview with Sisley about her perspective regarding her termination and provides context about how recent political activism in Arizona may have led to Sisley’s termination.


  The Los Angeles Times "Pot Researcher Abruptly Fired By University of Arizona" by Evan Halper.

The Los Angeles Times reports that the University of Arizona has fired MAPS-sponsored marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, the study coordinator for MAPS’ planned study of marijuana for PTSD. In an interview with Sisley, she explains how her contract was terminated by the University of Arizona without any reference to her job performance, speculating on how politics may have influenced the university’s decision. “This is a clear political retaliation for the advocacy and education I have been providing the public and lawmakers,” Sisley said. “I pulled all my evaluations and this is not about my job performance.”


  HuffPost Live "Professor Says University Fired Her Over Medical Marijuana Study" by Alyona Minkovski.

HuffPost Live interviews marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley about the political implications regarding the University of Arizona’s decision to terminate her employment and how it will affect MAPS’ planned research into the benefits of treating symptoms of PTSD with medical marijuana. Sisley speaks candidly about her termination, provides a comprehensive overview of her involvement with an FDA-approved study of marijuana for PTSD, and explains how difficult it is to tell veterans with treatment-resistant PTSD that they have to wait longer for an alternative treatment. “It just seemed to be a deliberate repression of all of my academic pursuits at the UofA,” explains Sisley. “It’s hard to ignore the fact that all of my work surrounds marijuana— whether it’s marijuana education or marijuana research— that was the bulk of my work at the UofA.”


  Reuters "Arizona Psychiatry Professor Says Fired Over Marijuana Research" by David Schwartz.

Reuters investigates the unfolding story regarding the University of Arizona’s decision to fire marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, a psychiatry professor who has been working for over 5 years to initiate a study of medical marijuana for treating symptoms of PTSD. Sisley is interviewed about the conversations and events that preceded her termination, speculating that the university’s decision was motivated by political influence as opposed to job performance. “It appears this is happening because I am at forefront of the most controversial research happening at the university,” explains Sisley. “That’s why they are throwing me under the bus.”


  Psychedelic Frontier "Interview with Rick Doblin, Psychedelic Pioneer & Founder of MAPS"

Psychedelic Frontier interviews MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin, Ph.D., about his career of advocating for research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics and marijuana. Doblin speaks about the process of creating a non-profit psychedelic research organization, reveals how various psychedelic experiences helped shape his perspective of the world, and lists recent successes surrounding the process of turning MDMA-assisted psychotherapy into a prescription treatment option for PTSD. “The FDA has been pretty much an ally, not in favor of medical marijuana or in favor of psychedelic research, but in favor of science over politics,” explains Doblin. “That, combined with the openness at the Department of Defense and the VA, combined with a growing series of pilot studies that have shown MDMA to be really helpful, suggests that maybe if we can scale up and do the work necessary to raise $15-18 million and treat 400 more people, we’ll be able to get MDMA as a prescription medicine in 2021.”



June 27, 2014


  The New York Times "Obituary for Richard Rockefeller" by The David Rockefeller Family.

The New York Times publishes an obituary for prominent philanthropist Richard Rockefeller, M.D., who passed away on June 13, 2014 at the age of 65 while piloting a small plane that crashed in Westchester County, NY. The tribute honors Rockefeller’s life as a physician, activist, and philanthropist by highlighting his involvement with various nonprofit projects that helped fulfill his desire to make the world a better place. The David Rockefeller Family concludes the obituary by encouraging people to honor Richard Rockefeller’s memory by contributing to the nonprofit organizations that he supported most, including MAPS, Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative, Sargasso Sea Alliance, and the Maine Coast Heritage Trust.



June 23, 2014


  The New York Times "A Rockefeller Known Not for Wealth but for His Efforts to Help" by Joseph Berger.

The New York Times honors the legacy of prominent philanthropist Richard Rockefeller, M.D., who passed away while piloting a small plane that crashed in New York on June 13, 2014. The article shares memories about Rockefeller’s life from his friends and family, providing perspective about Rockefeller’s varied hobbies, lifestyle, and philanthropic efforts. Rockefeller’s generous contributions toward improving the world are highlighted, including his work to provide medical care to areas of the world in need of assistance, preserve the sanctity of nature, and develop MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD. “Mr. Rockefeller, 65, was what is commonly called a Renaissance man, a Harvard-trained family doctor who could, among other enthusiasms, play the bagpipe, take polished photographs, carve wood, and ski, hike and sail expertly. But he devoted himself to a half-dozen causes, among them healing the wounds of post-traumatic stress disorder, curing sleeping sickness in Africa and saving the seas,” explains Joseph Berger of the New York Times.



June 22, 2014


  AlterNet "Blocking Science: How Congress and the DEA Have Thwarted Official Research on Pot for 40 Years" by April Short.

April Short of AlterNet writes about the new report published by MAPS and the Drug Policy Alliance on how the Drug Enforcement Administration has consistently obstructed research into the medical benefits of marijuana for decades. Short writes about the recommendations proposed in the report that could allow a more scientific approach to the approval of research. “This young man, this veteran who was having seizures in the brain now hasn’t had one for a year,” notes Congressional Representative Dana Rohrabacher. “And the fact that this VA doctor felt he couldn’t even honestly give his advice to a veteran who was going through brain seizures says there’s something really fundamentally wrong with the way things are working, and we need to change that and prove exactly what properties marijuana has, both negative and positive.”



June 20, 2014


  Reality Sandwich "The Second Psychedelic Revolution, Part Five: A Short Psychedelic History of Humanity" by James Oroc.

James Oroc writes for Reality Sandwich about the vast history of humans using psychedelics, highlighting how recent research into psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy is creating a “Second Psychedelic Revolution.” Oroc discusses the ancient use of psychedelics, contextualizes the first wave of psychedelic research beginning in the 1950’s, and highlights various researchers’ accomplishments that have served as catalysts for the new psychedelic research renaissance. “There are of course other factors and other people who have contributed greatly to this ongoing process and who also deserve mention; most importantly Rick Doblin and MAPS, who have almost single-handedly led the fight to get psychedelic research back into the Universities,” explains Oroc.


  AlterNet "Major Federal Health Official Admits That Prohibition Has Harmed Research Into Marijuana’s Benefits" by Paul Armentano.

AlterNet reports details from a Congressional hearing about marijuana research, highlighting National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Director Nora Volkow’s testimonial confirming that initiating marijuana research is more difficult than initiating research into other scheduled substances. The article features quotes from Congressional Representative Gerry Connolly’s exchange with Volkow during the House Committee on Oversight & Government Reform meeting, illustrating how Connolly’s questions to Volkow helped create a better understanding of the NIDA monopoly on research-grade marijuana and other notable impediments to clinical research into the benefits of marijuana.


   "Social Anxiety in Autistic Adults: First Two Subjects Enrolled"

On May 17 and June 20, 2014, the first and second subjects were enrolled in our new study of MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum. The first treatments are scheduled to take place in July. Based on the known effects of MDMA, as well as individual reports, this exploratory study in 12 subjects will focus on enhancing functional skills and quality of life in autistic adults with social anxiety. The study is led by Principal Investigator Charles Grob, M.D., and Co-Investigator Alicia Danforth, Ph.D., in affiliation with the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute.


  Mint Press News "Congress Pushes Feds To Expand Researchers’ Access To Marijuana" by Katie Rucke.

Mint Press News provides an extensive overview of the recent surge in support for medical marijuana, highlighting a letter signed by 30 members of Congress and sent to the Department of Health and Human Services Secretary in favor of removing restrictions to research into the medical benefits of marijuana. The article documents the various barriers preventing a full spectrum of marijuana research, reveals the inefficiency of the U.S. government-controlled monopoly on research-grade marijuana, and notes that cultural acceptance of medical marijuana is improving quickly. “It’s exciting to see such significant bipartisan support for eliminating barriers to privately funded medical marijuana drug development research,” explains Brad Burge of MAPS. “State legislatures, scientists and public opinion already recognize the need for more research into marijuana’s medical benefits, and Congress is now catching on. Even now, federal guidelines are preventing FDA-approved research from moving forward.”



June 19, 2014


  Business Week "Pot Scientists Brace for Marijuana Abuse as Laws Ease" by Anna Edney.

Bloomberg Business Week reports on the ongoing political obstacles preventing researchers from studying the benefits of medical marijuana. The article illustrates how the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)’s monopoly on the supply of marijuana does not include the necessary CBD-rich research-grade marijuana needed for MAPS’ planned study of marijuana for PTSD, compiles unsubstantiated claims about the potential risks of marijuana, and explores the possibility of importing research-grade marijuana from other countries. “I think we need all sorts of research into the risks of marijuana,” explains MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. “But what’s unbalanced is the obstruction of research into the benefits of marijuana.”



June 17, 2014


  Medical Jane "Report Suggests The DEA Has Ignored Four Decades Of Cannabis Research" by Ryan Longley.

Medical Jane offers perspective on a new comprehensive report on the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)’s scheduling of marijuana and other substances. The report written by MAPS and the Drug Policy Alliance highlights how the DEA has consistently obstructed marijuana rescheduling efforts, chronicles the DEA’s interference during the rescheduling of MDMA, and explains how the DEA has overruled and ignored scheduling rulings from the DEA Administrative Law Judge on multiple occasions. “Through the use of such tactics, the DEA has consistently demonstrated that it is more interested in maintaining existing drug laws than in making important drug control decisions based on scientific evidence,” notes the report.


  Congressman Earl Blumenauer "Blumenauer Urges More Marijuana Research"

Today, Representatives Earl Blumenauer (OR-03), H. Morgan Griffith (VA-09), Dana Rohrabacher (CA-48) and Jan Schakowsky (IL-9) along with 26 other members of Congress, sent a letter to the Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Matthews Burwell requesting that the process through which certified scientists obtain marijuana for medical research be made less burdensome.

View the letter.


  The Huffington Post "30 Members Of Congress Demand Increased Access To Marijuana For Research Purposes" by Matt Ferner.

The Huffington Post reports that on June 17, 2014, 30 members of Congress sent a letter to Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell to end the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)’s monopoly on research-grade marijuana and the redundant reviews that are preventing scientists from developing marijuana into a prescription drug. The letter offers solutions that would allow research to move forward more efficiently, suggesting that researchers should be able to purchase marijuana for research at-cost from NIDA if they are not being funded by the National Institute of Health and have received approval from the Food and Drug Administration, the Drug Enforcement Administration, and an Institutional Review Board. “We need the Administration to stop targeting marijuana above and beyond other drugs when it comes to research,” explains Congressional Representative Earl Blumenauer. “By increasing access for scientists who are conducting studies, we end the Catch-22 of opponents claiming they can’t support medical marijuana because there’s not enough research, but blocking research because they don’t support medical marijuana.”


  UPI "Thirty Members of Congress Ask HHS to Facilitate The Research of Medical Marijuana" by JC Sevcik.

UPI reports that 30 members of Congress are voicing their support in favor of removing barriers preventing researchers from efficiently studying the benefits of medical marijuana by sending a Congressional sign-on letter to Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell. The article demonstrates the importance of understanding the scientific and medical potential of marijuana by highlighting rational views from Congressional Representatives and drug policy experts regarding the current system of approving marijuana research. “Considering the number of states with medical marijuana laws and the number of patients who use marijuana medicinally in the United States, it is clear that we need more scientific information about the therapeutic risks and benefits of marijuana,” explains the Congressional sign-on letter.



June 14, 2014


  Vice "DEA Accused of Obstructing Research on Marijuana Benefits" by Mary Emily O’Hara.

Vice gives an extensive overview of the politics of medical marijuana research, highlighting a new report from MAPS and the Drug Policy Alliance revealing the Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA) decades-long obstruction of marijuana research. The article presents case studies from the report, notes that the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is in violation of the Controlled Substances Act of 1970 by not providing an uninterrupted supply of research-grade marijuana for FDA-approved research, and offers logical counterpoints to the government’s rationale regarding the scheduling of marijuana. “It’s like giving the Highway Patrol the ability to set speed limits,” explains former DEA senior intelligence research specialist Sean Dunagan.



June 13, 2014


  Stop the Drug War "DEA Ignores Science, Obstructs Research, New Report Finds" by Phillip Smith.

Stop the Drug War summarizes a new report written by MAPS and Drug Policy Alliance focusing on the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)’s refusal to utilize scientific evidence in their scheduling of marijuana and other substances. The article features an overview of the DEA’s interference with medical marijuana research, publishes viewpoints from politicians and activists, and highlights suggestions that could help reduce the DEA’s obstruction of research into the medical benefits of marijuana. “The DEA has opposed efforts to reform federal scheduling policy to acknowledge that marijuana has medical purposes,” explains Dr. Carl Hart of Columbia University. “As someone who has studied marijuana, this concerns me. That the DEA has not rescheduled marijuana seems to go against all the scientific evidence and against a society that uses empirical evidence.”


  The New York Times "Ayahuasca: A Strong Cup of Tea" by Bob Morris.

The New York Times publishes a comprehensive article about the role of ayahuasca in medicine, religion, and popular culture. The article highlights the experiences of multiple people who have participated in ayahuasca ceremonies, analyzes increased media attention surrounding ayahuasca, and provides perspectives from researchers about the potential benefits and risks of ayahuasca. “It must be used carefully, but it has a good mind and body connection,” explains MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin, Ph.D. “You have a sense of inner light in your brain.”


  The New York Times "Dr. Richard Rockefeller Dies in Small-Plane Crash" by Marc Santora.

On Friday, June 13, prominent MAPS supporter Dr. Richard Rockefeller died when the plane he was piloting crashed in Westchester County, NY. He was 65. “Richard’s political wisdom and generosity in making personal connections have helped us eliminate barriers to research that we had been unable to overcome for over 20 years,” reflected MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. “Now everything is different because of Richard.”



June 11, 2014


  Vox "6 Ways The Federal Government Continues Its War on Marijuana" by German Lopez.

Vox highlights six ways that the federal government is waging a “war” on marijuana, noting how various agencies are interfering with marijuana research and medical marijuana dispensaries. The article explains why it is difficult for researchers to initiate clinical research into the benefits of marijuana and describes the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)’s monopoly on the only government-approved supply of research-grade marijuana allowed for clinical research.


  Drug Truth Network "Interview with Rick Doblin About Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin"

Drug Truth Network interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin about the legacy of Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin, the pioneering psychedelic researcher who passed away on June 2, 2014 at the age of 88. Doblin speaks about Shulgin’s vast psychedelic research career, Shulgin’s involvement with creating the underground psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy movement, and ongoing research into treating PTSD from various causes with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy.


  Huffington Post "New Report Blasts DEA For Spending 4 Decades Obstructing Marijuana Science" by Matt Ferner.

The Huffington Post highlights the new joint report from MAPS and the Drug Policy Alliance on how the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) prevents research into the benefits of medical marijuana. The article includes perspectives from policy advocates who propose more rational approaches to federally regulated drug research. “The DEA has obstructed research into the medical use of marijuana for over 40 years and in the process has caused immeasurable suffering that would otherwise have been treated by low-cost, low-risk generic marijuana,” explains MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. “The DEA’s obstruction of the FDA approval process for marijuana has—to the DEA’s dismay—unintentionally catalyzed state-level medical marijuana reforms.”


  Boston Globe "Lawmakers Slam DEA For Targeting Mass. Doctors" by Kay Lazar, Shelley Murphy.

The Boston Globe reports that the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is threatening the careers of physicians and doctors in Massachusetts by forcing them to sever connections to medical marijuana dispensaries to maintain their licenses to prescribe other medications. Members of Congress have begun to speak out against the DEA’s actions in Massachusetts and are advocating for a new measure with the intention of protecting state marijuana laws from DEA interference. “It’s intimidation,” US Representative Steve Cohen explains. “We should encourage doctors to be involved with medical [marijuana] dispensaries . . . yet they are trying to run people off.”


  Al Jazeera America "DEA Obstructs Research into Medical Marijuana: Report" by Renee Lewis.

Al Jazeera America calls attention to a new report from MAPS and the Drug Policy Alliance about the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)’s continuous resistance to scientific research into the benefits of medical marijuana. The report, “The DEA: Four Decades of Impeding and Rejecting Science,” features a compilation of case studies illustrating how the DEA obstructs research and maintains unscientific drug scheduling standards. The article highlights a group teleconference hosted by MAPS and DPA that gathered members of Congress, scientists, policy experts, and medical marijuana advocates to provide perspective about the DEA’s interference with medical research. “To say the least I’m living proof that cannabis saves lives … it may not be the answer for everyone, but not only vets, but others should have the safe, legal option to treat their ailments with marijuana instead of all the prescription pills,” explains veteran Sean Azzariti.


  Substance "New Report Condemns the DEA’s Willful Obstruction of Science" by Mei Schultz.

Substance highlights a new report about the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)’s obstruction of scientific research into the medical benefits of marijuana. The report, by MAPS and the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA), was accompanied by a teleconference on June 11, 2014, featuring policy makers and drug policy advocates discussing solutions for expediting medical marijuana research. “The DEA is a police and propaganda agency,” explains DPA Executive Director Ethan Nadelmann. “It makes no sense for it to be in charge of federal decisions involving scientific research and medical practice, especially when its successive directors have systematically abused their discretionary powers in this area.”



June 10, 2014


  Drug Policy Alliance, MAPS "The DEA: Four Decades of Impeding and Rejecting Science"

This report, co-published by DPA and MAPS, illustrates a decades-long pattern of behavior that demonstrates the Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA’s) inability to exercise its responsibilities in a fair and impartial manner or to act in accord with the scientific evidence.


  MAPS, DPA "PRESS RELEASE: Wednesday Teleconference: New Report Highlights DEA’s Obstruction of Science"

On Wednesday, June 11, the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) and the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) will hold a press teleconference to accompany the release of their new report, “The DEA: Four Decades of Impeding and Rejecting Science.” The report – which is being made available today – documents a decades-long pattern of systematically obstructing medical research and ignoring scientific evidence.

Listen to the recorded teleconference.



June 9, 2014


  Arizona Public Media "AZ Health Officials Have Last Word on Medical Pot for PTSD" by Maria Inés Taracena.

Arizona Public Media announces that a new court ruling from Arizona Administrative Judge Thomas Shedden will allow people in Arizona to purchase medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD if it is approved by State Department of Health Services Director Will Humble. MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley shares her positive perspective regarding this ruling, notes anecdotal evidence suggesting safe and successful use of marijuana for PTSD, and discusses working with the University of Arizona to conduct new research into marijuana for PTSD. “Judge Shedden took a compassionate approach and was willing to listen to both patient experience and physician experience, and that is why this judgement is so sensible…because he is doing the right thing by our veterans,” explains Sisley.



June 7, 2014


  Associated Press "Arizona Judge Rules Pot Can Be Used for PTSD" by Terry Tang.

The Associated Press reports that an Arizona administrative law judge has issued a court ruling intended to allow PTSD to be accepted as a qualifying condition for patients seeking medical marijuana treatment in Arizona. The ruling must be accepted within one month by State Department of Health Services Director Will Humble, who previously rejected a similar initiative due to lack of research. The article highlights MAPS’ planned research into marijuana for veterans with PTSD and notes how veterans and others in favor of medical marijuana research are speaking out during rallies, court hearings, and media interviews to generate widespread awareness about alternative treatment methods for PTSD.



June 6, 2014


  Medical News Today "Moderate Doses of MDMA ‘Fatal in Warm Environments’" by David McNamee.

Medical News Today provides perspective about research into the risks, safety, and benefits of MDMA. The article places focus on the risk of overheating after ingesting MDMA and shares optimistic hope for future research that may help reduce various risks. David McNamee of Medical Daily News highlights MAPS-sponsored research into MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum for its potential therapeutic advantage over traditional medication for social anxiety. “The reason why researchers have turned to MDMA as a treatment for this group is because the conventional prescription medication used to treat anxiety or depression in other adults is often ineffective in people who have autism,” explains McNamee.


  Midwest Real "Do Psychedelics Have a Place in the Future of Medicine?" by Michael Phillip.

Midwest Real interviews Brad Burge of MAPS and retired Army Ranger Tim Amoroso about clinical research and anecdotal testimonials suggesting that the therapeutic use of psychedelics can provide profound healing for people suffering from a variety of conditions. The group discusses current research into the medical potential of various psychedelics, the best approaches to pursuing a career in the field of psychedelics, the value of the internet and social media for providing psychedelic education, and future research that can lead to FDA-approval for prescription use of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy.


  The Street "Government Pot Contract Open for Bids, but Nobody Wants It" by Debra Borchardt.

The Street analyzes the U.S. government’s planned renewal of a contract to grow research-grade marijuana, bringing attention to the current monopoly held by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). The article exposes how NIDA’s monopoly on research-grade marijuana is hindering the advancement of science while also in violation of the Controlled Substances Act of 1970 due to an inadequate supply of marijuana. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin shares his ideas and optimism regarding overcoming the obstacles preventing effective research into the medical benefits of marijuana, stating, “The NIDA monopoly is doomed. It will be broken by foreign imports.”



June 5, 2014


  The Conversation "Molecules Have No Morals: Ecstasy Godfather Alexander Shulgin’s Legacy" by Simon Cotton.

The Conversation honors the life of Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin, the recently deceased psychedelic researcher who passed away on June 2, 2014, at the age of 88. The article focuses on Shulgin’s legacy surrounding his creation of hundreds of psychedelics, his advocacy for the therapeutic use of MDMA, and his work co-authoring psychedelic education books PiHKAL and TiHKAL. “Shulgin maintained that his work was motivated by a belief that MDMA and other molecules could be useful aids to psychotherapists and in recent years evidence has emerged that MDMA may be useful in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder, whether victims of war or sexual assault,” explains Simon Cotton of The Conversation. “MDMA may yet prove to be Alexander Shulgin’s most valuable legacy.”



June 4, 2014


  Los Angeles Times "Alexander Shulgin, Chemist Behind MDMA, Dies at 88" by David Colker.

The Los Angeles Times publishes an obituary for Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin, the pioneering psychedelic researcher who passed away on June 2, 2014 at the age of 88. The article details Shulgin’s path to becoming a psychedelic researcher, explores how Shulgin helped popularize MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, and shares his insights about psychedelics and consciousness. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin is quoted about Shulgin’s advocacy regarding the use of MDMA as an adjunct to psychotherapy, stating, “It was the best candidate for legal therapy out of all the drugs he helped create.”


  Reset.me "Mother of Four Cures PTSD With MDMA" by Amber Lyon.

Amber Lyon of Reset.me interviews MDMA-assisted psychotherapy study participant Rachel Hope about how receiving MDMA as an adjunct to therapy in a clinical trial helped her overcome treatment-resistant PTSD. Hope recounts her experience, describes the importance of setting intentions for psychedelic experiences, and reveals life-changing insights that have helped her recover from PTSD and live a more fulfilling life. “It was something like getting acquainted with my very, very best self,” explains Hope. “You get to turn that best, best self onto your most damaged self. Wow— That’s profound.”


  Huffington Post "In Memoriam: Alexander Shulgin, The ‘Godfather of Ecstasy’" by Rick Cusick.

The Huffington Post pays tribute to the life of Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin, the pioneering psychedelic researcher who passed away on June 2, 2014 at the age of 88. The article shares Shulgin’s perspective on the future of psychedelics, highlights FDA-approved research into substances that Shulgin helped popularize, and examines the legacy that Shulgin’s books and chemistry will leave behind. “He was the bridge between ancient spiritual traditions and modern chemical science, and his many contributions that he made to mankind are likely to resonate through the ages,” explains Rick Cusick.


  Reason TV "In Praise of Psychedelics: Rick Doblin and the MAPS Project" by Alex Manning, Paul Feine.

Reason TV interviews leaders in the field of psychedelic science about the history and future of research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics to treat a variety of serious medical conditions. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin speaks about the benefits of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, shares information about the history of MAPS and the resurgence of psychedelic research, and speaks about his vision for the future of psychedelics. “By the end of 2021, we are hoping that MDMA would be a prescription medicine,” explains Doblin.


  NPR "How A Scientist Of Psychedelics Became The ‘Godfather Of Ecstasy’" by Audie Cornish.

NPR interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin about the legacy of pioneering psychedelic researcher Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin. Doblin speaks about Shulgin’s history of creating and experimenting with hundreds of psychedelic substances, commends him for being an advocate of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, and explains how his work will be remembered by future generations. “The legacy of Sasha will be, on the one hand, this incredible nuanced understanding of consciousness, spirituality, psychotherapy, love and the depth of human emotions. That’s what Sasha was really committed to - was trying to piece apart how it is that these molecules can open us up to parts of ourselves,” notes Doblin. “And on the other hand, he was a staunch defender of the right of individuals to explore their own consciousness at sometimes great risk to himself.”


  Reason Magazine "Reason’s Special Issue on Drugs"

Reason Magazine publishes a special issue on the role of psychedelics and marijuana in science, politics, and culture. The issue includes articles and videos on the politics of medical marijuana, the need for improved drug policy laws, making psychedelic research appeal to mainstream audiences, and more.



June 3, 2014


  International Business Times "Sasha Shulgin, the ‘Godfather of Ecstasy’ Takes His Final Trip - Death" by Ewan Palmer.

International Business Times memorializes the life of Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin, who passed away on June 2, 2014 at the age of 88. The article highlights Shulgin’s long career, ranging from the synthesis of new psychedelics to becoming an advocate of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy. Ewan Palmer of International Business Times notes that Shulgin’s research is laying the groundwork for a new generation of scientists to use psychedelics for their healing potential, stating, “Thanks to Shulgin’s original paper, medical studies on the positive effects of MDMA are still being carried out to this day, with clinical trials showing it has the potential to be used as treatment for anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).”


  Motherboard "‘Dr. Ecstasy’ Alexander Shulgin Is Dead, Leaving a More Euphoric and Weird World" by Michael Byrne.

Motherboard reviews the life of Dr. Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin, the recently deceased pioneering psychedelic researcher responsible for creating hundreds of psychedelic substances and for recognizing the therapeutic potential of MDMA. The article details Shulgin’s early career, reveals details about the birth of underground psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, and lists how recent studies into the therapeutic potential of MDMA were inspired by Shulgin’s research.


  The Washington Post "Chemist Alexander Shulgin, Popularizer of the Drug Ecstasy, Dies at 88" by Brian Vastag.

The Washington Post commemorates the life of Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin, the pioneering psychedelic researcher who passed away on June 2, 2014, at the age of 88. The obituary highlights Shulgin’s expansive career, his advocacy for the psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, and his perspective on the legacy of his work. “Sasha always felt these drugs didn’t open people up to drug experiences, but opened us up to human experiences of ourselves,” explains MAPS Founder Rick Doblin.



June 2, 2014


  The Hill "Sanctioning New Drug Research is Best Way to Honor Fallen Soldiers" by Andrew Gargano.

The Hill reports on the growing number of people suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), making a call for better treatment options for veterans and others diagnosed with PTSD. The article highlights research into the therapeutic use of MDMA, marijuana, and psilocybin as alternative treatment methods for people diagnosed with PTSD, noting that further research is required to better understand these treatments. “Perhaps the best benefit from these drugs is that they only need to be administered a few times in comparison to other costly medications which need to be taken daily for years,” explains Andrew Gargano of The Hill.



May 30, 2014


  Drug War Chronicle "The Ibogaine Frontier: A Report from Durban" by Douglas Greene.

Douglas Greene of the Drug War Chronicle reports on research presented in Durban, South Africa at the International Ibogaine Provider’s Conference, highlighting research results from studies into ibogaine-assisted therapy for drug addiction. The article features a review of presentations about the safety, sustainability, and science surrounding ibogaine. The review of the event includes updates from MAPS-sponsored ibogaine researchers Thomas Kingsley Brown, Ph.D., and Geoff Noller, Ph.D., about insights from observational studies taking place in Mexico and New Zealand.



May 27, 2014


  Northern Virginia Magazine "Venturing Strange Terrain" by Helen Mondloch.

Northern Virginia Magazine highlights the upcoming publication of award-winning journalist Tom Shroder’s new book Acid Test, a captivating true story about the resurgence of psychedelic research. The article features a brief review of Acid Test, highlighting Shroder’s investigative work into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics. “‘Acid Test’ explores the subject of psychedelic drugs on an epic scale, unearthing annals stranger than fiction,” explains Helen Mondloch of Northern Virginia Magazine. “Shroder recounts the medical renaissance of these and other psychoactive substances through a convergence of stories, including Doblin’s and that of an Iraq war vet whose treatments with MDMA reportedly helped him confront and surmount the anguishes born of combat.”



May 24, 2014


  Santa Cruz Sentinel "A New Way To Heal: Nonprofit Navigates Politics, Science To Put MDMA On Path To Clinical Use" by Jason Hoppin.

The front page of the Santa Cruz Sentinel features a comprehensive report on MAPS’ work, focusing on the history of the non-profit, current research into the therapeutic use of psychedelics, and how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can help people overcome treatment-resistant PTSD. “Studies are showing MDMA several times more effective than either Zoloft or Paxil at treating PTSD,” explains Jason Hoppin of the Santa Cruz Sentinel. “And unlike those medicines, patients do not need to keep taking the drug in order see the benefits — MDMA seems to permanently restructure a patient’s relationship to trauma.”


  Pioneer Press "Red Tape Slows Minnesota Medical Marijuana Study" by Christopher Snowbeck.

Pioneer Press reports on medical marijuana research in the United States, highlighting how political obstacles are preventing studies of marijuana to treat PTSD, pain, and other conditions. Researchers at the University of Minnesota have received a grant to fund a study of marijuana for pain in patients with sickle cell disease, though the research cannot commence due to lack of cooperation from government agencies. MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley expresses her frustration about political obstacles surrounding marijuana research, highlighting recent news that the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) does not have the necessary amount of CBD-rich research-grade marijuana for MAPS’ FDA-approved study of marijuana for PTSD.



May 23, 2014


  PolicyMic "Scientists Studied What Psychedelics Do to the Brain, and It’s Not What You’ve Been Told" by Tom McKay.

PolicyMic analyzes research into psilocybin for reducing alcoholism, treating anxiety associated with advanced-stage cancer, managing cluster headaches, and facilitating spiritual experiences. The article explores psychedelic research, highlighting promising studies of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. Psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy researcher Katherine MacLean of Johns Hopkins University speculates on the future of psilocybin research and speaks about positive changes in personality reported by study participants. “Many years later, people are saying it was one of the most profound experiences of their life,” explains MacLean. “If you think about it in that context, it’s not that surprising that it might be permanent.”



May 22, 2014


  AZ Central "Insider: Recall Effort Against Sen. Kimberly Yee Over Medical Pot Ends" by Yvonne Wingett Sanchez.

AZ Central reports that veterans in favor of medical marijuana research have withdrawn a recall initiative against Arizona state Senator Kimberly Yee, who blocked a bill intended to fund MAPS’ FDA-approved research into marijuana for PTSD. After launching the recall effort in April, the Arizona Veterans Assistance Committee worked alongside Yee and her attorney to come to an agreement about future legislature and research. Yvonne Wingett Sanchez of AZ Central shares information from her interview with Daron Babin of the Arizona Veteran’s Assistance Committee, noting that “Yee has committed to building a bi-partisan coalition to craft legislation next session that would allow funding for the study of cannabis as a treatment to various ailments.”



May 21, 2014


  Reset.Me "How Psychedelics Are Saving Lives" by Amber Lyon.

Amber Lyon of Reset.Me highlights clinical research indicating that the therapeutic use of psychedelics can help people overcome PTSD, anxiety, depression, and addiction.



May 20, 2014


  FOX CT "Ask the Pharmacist"

Pharmacy professor Dr. Michael White of the University of Connecticut speaks in a 6-minute feature on FOX CT about using MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in treating PTSD.


  Southern California Public Radio "Can Psychedelic Drugs Help Treat Addiction?" by Larry Mantle.

Larry Mantle of Southern California Public Radio hosts an episode of AirTalk focused on research into psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy for treating severe alcoholism and other drug addictions. Professor John Kelly of Harvard Medical School and Marc Mahoney of SOBA Recovery Center join in a discussion about traditional addiction treatments, current psychedelic research, and the benefits and risks of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy. “The stigma of using psychedelic drugs is fading, and renewed interest in this kind of therapy has prompted new studies across the country,” notes Mantle.



May 19, 2014


  Southern California Public Radio "Psychedelic Science: Psilocybin Shows Promise Treating Cancer Anxiety" by Stephanie O'Neill.

In the final installment of their four-part report on psychedelic science, Southern California Public Radio writes about ongoing research into psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage cancer. Stephanie O’Neill examines the culture surrounding death in our society, interviews researchers about how psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy can help cancer patients overcome the fear of death, and shares stories from study participants about how the treatment has helped them reevaluate how they spend their time while they are still alive. “To me it’s been some of the most remarkable clinical findings I’ve ever seen as a psychiatrist,” explains Johns Hopkins researcher Stephen Ross.

Read Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four


  Southern California Public Radio "Psychedelic Science: Using Ecstasy to Treat Post Traumatic Stress Disorder" by Stephanie O'Neill.

In Part Three of a four-part series on psychedelic science, Southern California Public Radio reports on the growing body of research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD, highlighting currently ongoing studies and the publication of research results. Stephanie O’Neill highlights how MDMA was originally used by psychologists as an adjunct to therapy in the 1970’s and 80’s, interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin about how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can help people approach their trauma in a more effective way than conventional therapy, and speaks with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy researcher Dr. Michael Mithoefer about the significance of the published results. “We had very strong results,” explains Mithoefer. “This may turn out to be a very effective therapy for many people who wouldn’t respond to other things…so the potential is there could be millions of people helped who aren’t being helped now.”

Read Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four


  Southern California Public Radio "Psychedelic Science: Researchers Enlist Psilocybin to Help Fight Alcoholism" by Stephanie O'Neill.

In Part Two of a four-part series, Southern California Public Radio reports on research into psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy for alcoholism and drug addiction. Stephanie O’Neill interviews a study participant who quit drinking alcohol after psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy, and notes that research into ayahuasca and ibogaine for the treatment addiction is also showing promising preliminary results. Johns Hopkins researcher Dr. Stephen Ross explains how integrating insights from psychedelic experiences can be just as important as the experience itself, stating, “Somebody can have an amazing transcendental experience and they can have insight that ‘I should never use drugs again,’” notes Ross. “But if there is nothing afterwards to contain and embed and nurture those experiences, it will just fade.”

Read Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four


  Southern California Public Radio "Psychedelic Science: The Surge In Psychiatric Research Using Hallucinogens" by Stephanie O'Neill.

Southern California Public Radio journalist Stephanie O’Neill debuts her new four-part report on new research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics for the treatment of PTSD, alcoholism, drug addiction, and anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. O’Neill interviews leaders of the psychedelic science field about past and current psychedelic research, explains how the birth of 1960’s counterculture contributed to the origin of the War on Drugs, and explores the mechanisms behind psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy. “It’s a new world and there is a greater need than ever for more effective treatment models for individuals for whom our conventional treatment models are often sorely lacking,” explains UCLA researcher Dr. Charles Grob.

Read Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four



May 18, 2014


  London Real "Rick Doblin - MDMA Therapy" by Brian Rose.

London Real host Brian Rose interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin about the “psychedelic renaissance” and inspiring international research into the therapeutic uses of psychedelics and marijuana. Doblin updates us on recent breakthroughs in medical marijuana and MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD research, announces MAPS’ upcoming crowdfunding campaign for psychedelic research, and discusses potential upcoming research for veterans. Doblin enthusiastically notes that psychedelic research is showing no signs of slowing down, stating, “There is more research now than any time since the late 1960’s.”



May 15, 2014


  Huffington Post "DEA Chief Michele Leonhart Should Resign" by Bill Piper.

Bill Piper of the Drug Policy Alliance encourages Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Administrator Michele Leonhart to resign due to her history of actively obstructing marijuana research, making inaccurate statements about the safety of marijuana and other substances, and disagreeing with drug policy reform suggestions from Attorney General Eric Holder and President Obama. “The U.S. and the rest of the world are moving toward an approach that prioritizes public health and legal regulation,” explains Piper, “but she remains hopelessly committed to the failed war-on-drugs approach. She is plagued with scandals, out of touch with reality, and increasingly an embarrassment to both Attorney General Holder and President Obama.”



May 12, 2014


  Midnight Sunrise Radio "The War on Cognitive Liberty" by Charles Shaw.

Charles Shaw of Midnight Sunrise Radio interviews former drug war prisoner Casey William Hardison and his partner, activist Charlotte Walsh, about how the War on Drugs often causes non-violent offenders to be imprisoned longer than those convicted of violent crimes. Hardison narrates the tumultuous history surrounding his 10-year prison sentence, shares insights about psychedelic chemistry, and emphasizes the importance of cognitive freedom.


  MAPS "Letter to MAPS Supporters" by Rick Doblin, Ph.D..

MAPS and Veterans for Medical Cannabis Access (VMCA) are requesting the help of our friends and supporters in contacting your Congressional Representative before May 19 [Update: Extended to June 9] asking them to add their signature to a Congressional Sign-On Letter urging that federal obstruction of non-NIH funded medical marijuana research be reduced by ending the redundant protocol review process by the Public Health Service (PHS).



May 11, 2014


  The World Today Weekend "Interview with Andrew Feldmar About Psychedelic-Assisted Psychotherapy" by Sean Leslie.

The World Today Weekend host Sean Leslie interviews MDMA-assisted psychotherapy researcher Andrew Feldmár about past, current, and future psychedelic research. Feldmar illustrates the pathway to approval for prescription use of MDMA and LSD as adjuncts to psychotherapy, shares his optimism about the training of future psychedelic therapists, and explains how treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can be more effective than currently-approved prescription medicines. “Within half an hour after taking MDMA, you’re present, your heart is open, and you feel no shame. So you can immediately deal with traumatic memories,” explains Feldmar. “It can save 5-10 years in psychotherapy.”



May 8, 2014


  Leaf Science "Marijuana Use May Improve PTSD, Study Finds"

Leaf Science reports on research into treating symptoms of PTSD with marijuana, highlighting FDA-approved research planned by MAPS and the recent publication of results from an observational study of marijuana for PTSD. Results from a New Mexico observational study conducted by George Greer, MD, indicate that marijuana helped reduce symptoms of PTSD by 75% on average.



May 7, 2014


  Medical Daily "Using Ecstasy To Cure PTSD: Psychedelic Gives War Veterans A New Lease On Life" by Anthony Rivas.

Medical Daily highlights research indicating that MDMA-assisted psychotherapy could be a promising future treatment for people suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The article highlights the rate of PTSD among U.S. war veterans, describes how the reputation surrounding MDMA is increasing favorably, and explains how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy helps patients approach their PTSD in an entirely new way. Anthony Rivas of Medical Daily notes that research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics is making a resurgence, stating, “MDMA is among other psychotherapeutic drugs experiencing a comeback, as psychiatrists look to promising alternative treatments.”



May 6, 2014


  Military Times "In Study, Ecstasy Shows Promise for Treating PTSD" by Kyrie O'Connor.

Military Times explores promising results of research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD, highlighting the impact the treatment could have on reducing the PTSD epidemic. The article suggests that this treatment method should be provided for people with PTSD who live in Texas during the next phase of studies, noting that Texas is one of the largest concentrations of veterans from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. The article investigates how MDMA interacts with the brain, reveals the history of MDMA’s transition from being a therapeutic tool to a recreational party drug, and notes that 83% of study participants overcame PTSD after receiving MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in a pilot study. “It’s tricky talking about a cure, but it is a sustained remission,” explains MAPS Clinical Investigator Michael Mithoefer, M.D.

This article first appeared in the Houston Chronicle and has been reposted by the Military Times.


  Houston Chronicle "In Study, Ecstasy Shows Promise for Treating PTSD" by Kyrie O'Connor.

Houston Chronicle explores promising results of research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD, highlighting the impact the treatment could have on reducing the PTSD epidemic. The article suggests that this treatment method should be provided for people with PTSD who live in Texas during the next phase of studies, noting that Texas is one of the largest concentrations of veterans from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. The article investigates how MDMA interacts with the brain, reveals the history of MDMA’s transition from being a therapeutic tool to a recreational party drug, and notes that 83% of study participants overcame PTSD after receiving MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in a pilot study. “It’s tricky talking about a cure, but it is a sustained remission,” explains MAPS Clinical Investigator Michael Mithoefer, M.D.



May 5, 2014


  International Voter Network "Studies Reveal Major Breakthroughs in Treating PTSD with Ecstasy" by Wendy Innes.

International Voter Network reports on research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy indicating that the treatment may help people overcome PTSD. The article highlights the history of MDMA, analyzes results from current MDMA research, and shares MAPS’ timeline for developing MDMA-assisted psychotherapy into a prescription treatment for PTSD. Wendy Innes of International Voter Network offers further details about the MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research, stating, “Study participants say that they are finding relief from the gut wrenching anxiety and other symptoms associated with PTSD that have plagued them for years.”


  The Huffington Post "The Federal Government Just Ordered A Thousand Pounds of Marijuana" by Matt Ferner.

The Huffington Post reports on the U.S. government’s increase in their production limits for research-grade marijuana from 46 to 1,433 pounds per year in anticipation of upcoming marijuana research. Despite the planned increase in production of research-grade marijuana, NIDA has recently announced that it does not currently have a supply of marijuana containing the balanced THC/CBD ratio that is necessary for our study of marijuana for PTSD, causing the commencement of this study to be further delayed by the government until at least the fall of 2014. Meanwhile, NIDA is in violation of the Controlled Substances Act of 1970, which requires it to provide a “continuous and uninterrupted supply” of marijuana for federally approved research.



May 2, 2014


  Vox "The Feds Are Looking to Score 650 Kilos of Weed" by German Lopez.

Vox reports that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) has increased the production quotas for research-grade marijuana grown by the federal government, allowing the supply of marijuana for research to increase from 21 kilograms per year to 650 kilograms— a nearly 3,000% increase. The increase in research-grade marijuana is for the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s supply grown at the University of Mississippi, a government-controlled monopoly that continues to create significant obstacles and delays for ongoing and planned research. “This is a big deal: it means the federal government is moving closer and closer to accepting marijuana for research and, potentially, medical purposes,” writes German Lopez of Vox.



April 30, 2014


  Fusion Live "Why Does Colorado Take Such a Hard Stand Against Marijuana to Treat Soldiers With PTSD?" by Ryan Nerz.

Fusion Live interviews Iraq war veteran Sean Azzariti about the politics of marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD. Azzariti describes recent government approvals of MAPS’ planned research into marijuana for PTSD as “huge step forward,” suggesting that this research could provide the evidence needed for PTSD to be added as a qualifying condition for medical marijuana programs across the country. “We want veterans to be able to speak directly to their doctors about this,” explains Azzariti. “I went from taking 13 pills a day to zero.”



April 29, 2014


  The Verge "Ecstatic States" by Lessley Anderson.

The Verge debuts their all-new longform report on the benefits of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The report highlights personal testimonials and researchers’ perspectives about healing trauma with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, notes the positive shift in public perception about the therapeutic potential of psychedelics, and illustrates the need for significant funding into the future of research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD. Vietnam veteran Bob Walker shares how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy helped him recover from PTSD, stating, “I did in 3 sessions what I couldn’t do in thirty, forty years.” MDMA-assisted psychotherapy study participant Rachel Hope also revisits the moment when she found out that she overcame treatment-resistant PTSD. “He comes back and sits down and says, ‘Rachel, you don’t have posttraumatic stress disorder any more,’” recalls Hope, on the verge of tears. “‘You don’t have it.’”


  The Bristol Post "Bristol Research: Danger Drugs ‘could Have Potential To Save Lives’" by Louis Emanuel.

The Bristol Post highlights emerging research into psilocybin, MDMA, and ketamine as treatments for addiction, depression, PTSD, obsessive compulsive disorder, and other conditions. The article profiles Dr. Tim Williams, a psychiatrist with experience researching addictions and psychedelics. “What we want to be able to do is use these drugs to help unstick people whose minds are stuck,” explains Williams. “Then we can allow them to engage with regular therapy, which they wouldn’t have been able to do before.


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Precious Moments Artist Timothy Butcher Leaves $1.9 Million Bequest to MAPS"

Funding for research into the therapeutic uses of psychedelics and medical marijuana increased significantly this April, when the non-profit Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) announced that it will receive a generous $1.9 million bequest from the estate of longtime MAPS supporter Timothy Butcher.



April 28, 2014


  The Verge "The Verge’s Inside Look at MDMA Therapy Debuts Tomorrow"

The Verge announces tomorrow’s premiere of their investigative report about the past, present, and future of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, including the story of one Vietnam veteran who found that MDMA-assisted psychotherapy helped him recover from PTSD.


  The Raw Story "Mystical Visions Induced By Magic Mushrooms Help Cancer Patients Conquer Fear, Study Shows" by Travis Gettys.

The Raw Story explores ongoing research into the benefits of psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage cancer. New York University researchers conducting the study note that study participants have reported reductions in anxiety, depression, anger, social isolation, and hopelessness after receiving the psilocybin treatment. The article also touches upon the growing field of research into psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, highlighting MAPS’ research into the therapeutic potential of MDMA and LSD. “Patients will come to me and say, ‘I understand intuitively now that love is truly the most important force on the planet. I experienced a profound sense of peace that I never felt before and it has stayed with me. I know now that my consciousness is bigger than me.’” explains researcher Jeffrey Guss.



April 24, 2014


  April Short "Psychedelic Mushrooms Could Cure Anxiety for Cancer Patients" by AlterNet.

April Short of AlterNet reports that researchers at New York University are using psilocybin, the active ingredient in some psychedelic mushrooms, as an adjunct to psychotherapy for the treatment of anxiety associated with advanced-stage cancer. Testimonials and preliminary results from some of the 32 participants in the ongoing double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study suggest that the treatment method may hold promise. The article highlights the reemergence of research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics, also calling attention to MAPS’ recently completed study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety advanced-stage illness. “While the federal government still deems them dangerous and void of medical purpose,” writes Short, “Research continues to reveal a promising medical potential of most psychoactive Schedule I substances to treat issues ranging from pain and anxiety to addiction and cancer.”


  Elite Daily "Forget Raving, MDMA Is Helping War Veterans Cope With Their PTSD" by Sean Levinson.

Elite Daily shares Tony Macie’s perspective about his experience participating in a clinical trial of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD. The article pieces together Macie’s story with quotes from his interview with Vice, crafting a narrative that details preparing for the treatment, arriving to important realizations during the MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, and receiving a new outlook on life. “I realized that I was pushing people away, so I rekindled a lot of relationships with my family and friends, and I was more open to love,” explains Macie. “When I got home [from Iraq] I couldn’t really communicate with my family, but I think I’m a lot closer to them now.”


  Independent Voter Network "Federal Decision on Marijuana Research Gives Hope to PTSD Patients"

The Independent Voter Network reports on the progression of MAPS’ planned marijuana research, highlighting recent government approvals that have brought research into the benefits of marijuana for PTSD in veterans closer to commencing than ever before. The article commends MAPS for receiving approval from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to purchase research-grade marijuana after attempting to do so for over 22 years, and details additional political obstacles that are still delaying the initiation of this research.



April 23, 2014


  Vox "The Federal Government’s Insane Restrictions on Medical Marijuana" by German Lopez.

Vox details how the current path for clinical research into the medical benefits of marijuana is shrouded by obstacles including redundant government reviews and the current scheduling of marijuana. The article highlights how the change in perspective from politicians and the general public is persuading governmental organizations to reevaluate their stance on research. MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley provides updates about trying to initiate FDA-approved research into medical marijuana for PTSD and shares her perspective about the current roadblocks surrounding this research. “The whole scheduling system needs to be reevaluated by true medical professionals, not law enforcement officials,” explains Sisley.


  The Global Post "The Next Hotbed for Medical Marijuana Research" by Will Carless.

The Global Post investigates how Uruguay’s new laws permitting the cultivation, sale, and use of marijuana may help scientists study the effects of the drug with less political interference than any other country. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin expresses his support for marijuana research to be conducted in Uruguay, noting that it would “greatly influence” discussions in many places. “Research done in Uruguay that’s scientific and that ideally gets published in a scientific journal would have a big impact on the state level for states that were thinking of expanding the medical use of marijuana to conditions where they claim there’s no research,” Doblin said.



April 22, 2014


  Washington Times "Veterans Push to Test Marijuana as a Life-Saving Treatment for Crippling PTSD" by Jacqueline Klimas.

Washington Times highlights veterans’ organizations growing support for research into medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD. The article provides anecdotal testimonials from veterans about their successful use of marijuana for PTSD, and notes that FDA-approved research into the the effectiveness of this treatment method still requires major funding and additional government approval before commencing. Veteran Sean Azzariti speaks about how influential marijuana has been for treating his PTSD symptoms. “It changed my life,” Azzariti says. “I wouldn’t be talking to you right now if I kept taking those pills.”


  Vice "Ex-Soldiers Are Being Given MDMA To Help Them Manage Their PTSD" by Jack Gilbert.

Vice interviews U.S. Army veteran Tony Macie about how his experience participating in a clinical study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy helped him overcome treatment-resistant PTSD. Macie speaks about being deployed in Iraq for combat, struggling to treat PTSD with the currently accepted treatments, and how his relationship with PTSD “changed completely” after receiving MDMA as an adjunct to psychotherapy. Macie describes how this treatment method helped him realize that he should stop taking painkillers, make efforts to rekindle his connection with his family, and become more open and positive. “I want anyone who is lost as a result of trauma to be able to have this tool at his or her disposal,” explains Macie. “For me, MDMA-assisted psychotherapy opened the doors to compassion, love, and moving on.”


  MAPS "Exploring Psychedelic Medicines"

Leading researchers in the fast-growing Canadian psychedelic science field speak about the future of research at Exploring Psychedelic Medicines, an event hosted in Vancouver by MAPS Canada in collaboration with the Canadian Drug Policy Coalition on April 22, 2014.


  CPR "Can Pot help Veterans with PTSD?" by Andrea Dukakis and Ryan Warner.

CPR interviews MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley about the timeline surrounding FDA-approved research into the benefits of marijuana for treating symptoms of PTSD. Sisley speaks at length about anecdotal evidence for the effectiveness of marijuana for PTSD in veterans, overcoming political obstacles preventing the purchase of research-grade marijuana, and creating momentum alongside veterans, the public, and media outlets to help advance scientific research. “We’re looking forward to seeing a renaissance of marijuana research in this country,” explains Sisley.


  The Daily Beast "Are the Feds Hoarding Pot?" by Steven Wishnia.

The Daily Beast reports on marijuana research in the United States, noting that governmental agencies including the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the Public Health Service have the power to arbitrarily delay scientific advancement by refusing to approve studies and denying researchers access to research-grade marijuana. The article gives a comprehensive overview of NIDA’s funding and approval of other marijuana-related research, noting that the agency favors research into isolated cannabinoids found within marijuana as opposed to studying the medical applications of the whole marijuana plant. The evolving situation surrounding MAPS’ planned research into marijuana for PTSD is illustrated, noting recent news indicating that NIDA does not have an adequate supply of marijuana to provide for the study.



April 19, 2014


  Guardian Liberty Voice "Ecstasy the Newest Therapeutic Drug?" by Faye Barton.

Guardian Liberty Voice shares the results from a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of how MDMA interacts with the human brain. The study found that participants were able to be more open and less negative when thinking about their memories, noting that MDMA affects areas of the brain responsible for emotional control. The article uses the MRI study to corroborate published results from MAPS’ clinical research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD, making a case that the therapeutic use of MDMA may hold promise for treating mental health conditions such as PTSD.



April 18, 2014


  Mysterious Universe "Mysterious Universe Podcast Highlights Psychedelic Medicines" by Benjamin Grundy.

Mysterious Universe explores the therapeutic potential of psychedelics through testimonials from the new documentary Neurons to Nirvana: Understanding Psychedelic Medicines and the reddit Ask Me Anything session hosted by MDMA-assisted psychotherapy study participant and veteran Tony Macie.


  High Times "Psychedelic Science: Online Courses Start May 7" by Mike Adams.

High Times encourages their readers to register for MAPS’ first online course, “Psychedelic Science: How to Apply What We’re Learning to Your Life,” a 5-session educational webinar sharing insights about the role of psychedelics in science, art, medicine, and spirituality. “There has been an explosion of research into psychedelics as therapeutic tools, scientific tools, and spiritual tools,” explains course organizer Brad Burge of MAPS.  “And this course is intended to give an overview that is both broad and deep.”



April 16, 2014


  Huffingon Post "Veteran Explains How MDMA Helped Heal His Postwar Trauma" by Anna Almendrala.

The Huffingon Post highlights comments from MDMA-assisted psychotherapy study participant and veteran Tony Macie’s reddit “Ask Me Anything” (AMA) session. The reddit AMA generated over 2,000 questions and comments, providing Macie with an outlet to discuss his history with the military, suffering from PTSD, and how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy changed his life and relationship with PTSD. The article shares Tony’s account of receiving MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, providing in-depth details about how this treatment method can help people transform their relationship with trauma. “Ultimately I’d like to see the VA look into this as a tool for veterans,” explains Macie. “So people with PTSD who are treatment resistant to other things can have this as an option.”


  Business Insider "Veteran: Ecstasy Drug Saved Me From My Battle With PTSD" by Jeremy Bender.

Business Insider shares questions and answers from MDMA-assisted psychotherapy study participant and U.S. Army veteran Tony Macie’s reddit “Ask Me Anything” session. Macie’s AMA thread became the top story on the front page of reddit, generating over 1,800 questions and comments about healing trauma. The article shares Macie’s answers about his experience serving in the military, being diagnosed with PTSD, and how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy was the first treatment to help him effectively adjust his relationship with PTSD. “I remember when the MDMA kicked in saying out loud that this feeling of relaxation and peace had been what I had been seeking since I returned from the war,” explains Macie.


  Motherboard "These Short Online Psychedelic Courses Will Bend Your Mind" by DJ Pangburn.

Motherboard announces the upcoming online course “Psychedelic Science: How to Apply What We’re Learning to Your Life,” MAPS’ new 5-session webinar hosted by Evolver Learning Lab. Brad Burge of MAPS is interviewed about the formation and trajectory of the course, his previous history with psychedelic education, and details a variety of ways that psychedelics can be used in a therapeutic context. “Our goal for this course is to show how applying insights from psychedelic research can help us lead more conscious, responsible, sustainable, healthy, and fun lives,” explains Burge.


  reddit "MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy Study Participant Tony Macie Hosts Q&A on reddit" by Tony Macie.

On April 16, 2014, MDMA-assisted psychotherapy study participant and veteran Tony Macie participated in an AMA (Ask Me Anything) session hosted on reddit. The public interview became the top-rated post on the home page of reddit, generating over 2,000 questions and more than 250 responses about Tony’s experience in the military, developing PTSD, and how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in a clinical setting helped him overcome PTSD.



April 15, 2014


  Crushplate "The Bright Future Of Clinical LSD Research: A Conversation With MAPS"

Crushplate interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about promising results stemming from the completion of MAPS’ study into the benefits of LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. Burge provides details about the results and design of the study, obstacles surrounding psychedelic research, and shares his optimism for future research into LSD as a catalyst for personal development, creativity, and spiritual growth. “This scientific evidence indicating that LSD can be administered safely in a controlled clinical environment with proper support will pave the way for future studies conducted by MAPS and other scientists around the world,” explains Burge.



April 14, 2014


  Health Central "First LSD Hallucination: April 16, 1943"

Health Central shares a comprehensive history of LSD, ranging from its discovery and initial research, to countercultural use and recently completed research. The article explores how Dr. Albert Hofmann’s synthesis of LSD led to an abundance of research into the effects of the substance as an adjunct to psychotherapy in the 1950s and 1960s, noting that over 40,000 patients were administered LSD during that time. The article concludes by highlighting MAPS’ research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness, noting that the study was the first study of the therapeutic use of LSD in over 40 years.



April 11, 2014


  Flying Forms "Interview with Brad Burge: The Therapeutic Use of Psychedelics" by Rabia Yeaman.

Flying Forms interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about results from the growing field of psychedelic research. The interview focuses on the difference between treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy versus other treatments, the process of conducting research with criminalized substances, and the benefits of psychedelic-assisted therapy. Burge highlights how psychedelic research can be applied outside of medical contexts, noting that previous LSD studies helped pave the way for neuroscientists to better understand how serotonin works within the brain.


  AlterNet "5 Amazing Things Scientists Have Discovered About Psychedelics" by April M. Short.

April Short of AlterNet takes a look at a few of the most fascinating findings from contemporary psychedelic research, from DMT occurring naturally in the bodies of mammals to psilocybin reducing activity in certain parts of the brain rather instead of increasing it. The article also looks at ayahuasca and psilocybin’s potential as treatments for cocaine and nicotine addiction.



April 10, 2014


  Arizona Horizons "Arizona Horizons Interviews Dr. Sue Sisley" by Ted Simons.

Arizona Horizons hosts MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley for an interview about MAPS’ proposed three-year study of the safety and effectiveness of medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans. Sisley details the study protocol, expresses the need for funding to initiate and complete the research, and provides an overview of political obstacles that have delayed the study. “The progress on marijuana research has been stymied by a lot of the different federal regulations,” explains Sisley.


  The Electronic Music Alliance, DanceSafe, the Drug Policy Alliance, Mutual Aid Response Services (MARS), and the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) via Zendo Project "EDM Coalition Calls for Updated Safety and Harm Reduction Practices"

A broad alliance of harm reduction organizations have announced the formation of a new coalition focused on setting improved safety standards for music events and festivals around the world. The EDM Coalition advocates for event organizers to provide increased drug education, free water, space for attendees to relax, on-site drug testing, and other elements that promote public safety. “Our coalition of organizations stand ready to help them and other event organizers make those changes for better, safer events.” says Janine Jordan of the Electronic Music Alliance.



April 8, 2014


  MAPS Canada "Exploring Psychedelic Medicines: April 22 Event Presents Leading Psychedelic Research in Canada"

On Tuesday, April 22, 2014, at 7:00 PM, leading scientists and educators will host “Exploring Psychedelic Medicines,” an open conversation about new and ongoing research into the benefits and risks of psychedelics in an evening lecture and reception at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, BC. The event is presented by the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) Canada and co-sponsored the Canadian Drug Policy Coalition.



April 7, 2014


  Arizona Central "Medical-Pot Advocates Launch Recall Effort vs. Sen. Yee" by Yvonne Wingett Sanchez.

Arizona Central reviews the political backlash facing Senator Kimberly Yee after her decision to block HB 2333, a bill that could disperse funds raised from Arizona’s medical marijuana program into FDA-approved research into the benefits of marijuana for veterans with PTSD. The Arizona Veterans Assistance Committee has announced a recall petition in an effort to remove Senator Yee from office. “We formed this committee to make a statement,” remarks Kathy Inman of NORML [Arizona]. “We don’t feel that one lawmaker should have the power to stymie this sort of research.”


  Arizona Central "Medical-Pot Advocates Launch Recall Effort vs. Sen. Yee" by Yvonne Wingett Sanchez.

Arizona Central reviews the political backlash facing Senator Kimberly Yee after her decision to block HB 2333, a bill that could disperse funds raised from Arizona’s medical marijuana program into FDA-approved research into the benefits of marijuana for veterans with PTSD. The Arizona Veterans Assistance Committee has announced a recall petition in an effort to remove Senator Yee from office. “We formed this committee to make a statement,” remarks Kathy Inman of NORML [Arizona]. “We don’t feel that one lawmaker should have the power to stymie this sort of research.”


  Dose Nation "DoseNation Ep. 47: Dr. Rick Doblin" by Jake Kettle and Brian Normand.

Dose Nation interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin and Ryan LeCompte of Veterans for Entheogenic Therapy (VET) about their advocacy for increased research into the benefits of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy. Doblin speaks about MAPS’ psychedelic research program, the promising results from research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD, and creating a global understanding that psychedelics can safely be used as medicines. LeCompte speaks about his experience in the Marines, founding VET after the loss of a fellow Marine, and his hopes for a future where psychedelics can be used legally for their therapeutic potential by veterans, active duty soldiers, and anyone else who may receive benefits.


  Arizona Central "Arizona Marijuana Dispensaries Applaud Extract Ruling" by Ken Alltucker.

Arizona Central provides an overview of Arizona’s medical marijuana program. The article explains that conditions including depression, migraines, and PTSD do not currently qualify for access to medical marijuana in Arizona, and highlights the efforts of Dr. Sue Sisley and MAPS to initiate a study of medical marijuana for veterans with PTSD. Sisley voices her opinion about the Sen. Kimberly Yee’s blockade of HB 2333, a bill that could provide significant funding to MAPS’ proposed study, noting, “That would be really sad if the veterans suffer because of the schoolyard games that are being played down there [at the state legislature].”



April 6, 2014


  Oped News "Investing in Psychoactives" by Craig Comstock.

Craig Comstock of Oped News reviews Neurons to Nirvana: Understanding Psychedelic Medicines, a new documentary about the resurgence of research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics. In his review, Comstock provides context about the history of psychedelic research, explores the prohibition of psychedelics, and shares inspiring quotes and moments from the film. “If we’re moved by the experts whom the director has gathered, and his genius at finding images that resonate with their messages,” muses Comstock, “Then many viewers may reconsider attitudes toward mindful molecules.”


  San Francisco Chronicle "It’s About Time - Pot to Ease PTSD" by Michael J. Haworth.

San Francisco Chronicle shares a reader’s letter responding to recent coverage of MAPS’ research into marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD. Author Michael J. Haworth shares an optimistic perspective about the study’s overall progress. “Put a rush on this one, and when official approval is secured, cut through the red tape and help our vets rejoin society,” writes Haworth.


  Arizona Daily Wildcat "Pro: Marijuana Studies Smoke Out Confusion" by Eric Klump.

The Arizona Daily Wildcat writes about the level of acceptance for medical marijuana in America, highlighting research approvals and growing medical marijuana programs as evidence of a shift in public perception. The article notes that MAPS’ FDA-approved study into the medical benefits of marijuana for PTSD is facing political opposition due to Arizona State Senator Kimberly Yee’s opposition of HB 2333, a bill that could provide funding for the study. “If scientists had the abilities to research as they should, with fewer loopholes, we would know so much more, and no longer be trapped in a smoke cloud of marijuana misinformation,” writes Eric Klump of the Arizona Wildcat.



April 5, 2014


  International Business Times "Magic Mushrooms and LSD Help Cancer Patients Overcome Fear of Death, Say Scientists" by Tom Porter.

International Business Times writes favorably about the resurgence of psychedelic research, highlighting that studies of MDMA, LSD, and psilocybin are helping scientists develop new treatments for serious medical conditions. The article highlights the landmark completion of MAPS’ study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced stage illness and provides details about the initiation of new research into MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in autistic adults.


  Tricycle Magazine "Dharma on the Playa" by Allan Badiner.

Allan Badiner writes for Tricycle Magazine about how the Zendo Project’s psychedelic harm reduction services at Burning Man convinced him to attend the festival for his first time after having “planned never to go.” Badiner shares elaborate details about his experience as a Zendo Project volunteer, recounting how applying harm reduction principles taught during the Zendo volunteer training helped him provide compassionate care for individuals undergoing difficult psychedelic experiences. Badiner describes one of his experiences with a guest in need of help. “I reassured him that his discomfort would be short-lived, bringing him water and extra pillows,” writes Badiner. “I wanted him to know that I was available to witness what he was going through. I listened to him talk about his life, relationships, dreams, and fears.”



April 4, 2014


  NORML Phoenix "NORML Phoenix Rallies Arizona Legislators to Approve Medical Marijuana Funding Research For Veterans"

NORML Phoenix reports on the strong showing of veterans, research advocates, elected representatives, and others who gathered in Phoenix, Arizona, on April 2 to rally in support of research into medical marijuana for veterans with PTSD. The group joined together to raise awareness of Senator Kimberly Yee’s blocking of HB 2333, an Arizona bill that could partially fund research MAPS’ medical marijuana research. “Instead of listening to the voice of reason, or any voice at all… she stops the democratic process so that these veterans cannot get the treatment they know works for them,” explains Daron Babin of NORML.



April 3, 2014


  International Business Times "Ketamine, LSD, Magic Mushrooms and Ecstasy: The Illegal Drugs Which Can be Good for You" by Ewan Palmer.

International Business Times investigates how research into the medical benefits of substances such as LSD, MDMA, ketamine, psilocybin, and marijuana is helping scientists develop new methods for treating depression, addiction, anxiety, PTSD, and other serious conditions. The article highlights MAPS’ research into the potential benefits of using LSD and MDMA as an adjunct to psychotherapy, highlighting promising results indicating that these substances can be safely used in a therapeutic context.


  High Times "One Arizona Senator Is Blocking PTSD MedCan Research" by David Bienenstock.

High Times author David Bienenstock writes about the controversy surrounding Arizona state Senator Kimberly Yee’s refusal to allow the progression of HB 2333, a bill that could provide some funding for MAPS’ planned study of the therapeutic benefits of marijuana for veterans suffering from PTSD. Yee is blocking the bill in favor of providing drug use prevention education, stifling the advancement of scientific knowledge that could bring relief to veterans. “By refusing to consider HB 2333, Senator Yee is making it clear that she would prefer the research never to happen at all,” explains MAPS Founder Rick Doblin.


  Associated Press "Advocates Call for Funding of Marijuana Research in Ariz." by Astrid Galvan.

The Associated Press reports that on Wednesday, April 2, veterans, activists, and elected representatives rallied in support of HB 2333, an Arizona bill that could have provided funding MAPS’ research into medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD. “We think it’s very undemocratic that Sen. Yee would choose to ignore a bill that was supported by a wide margin in the Arizona House,” explains Jessica Gelay of the Drug Policy Alliance.



April 2, 2014


  Mint Press News "Ariz. Senator Blocks Fed-Approved PTSD Medical Marijuana Research" by Katie Rucke.

Mint Press News announces today’s rally in support of medical marijuana research, taking place in Phoenix, Arizona, from 5:00pm-7:00pm on April 2, 2014. This rally will protest Sen. Kimberly Yee’s blocking of HB 2333, a bill that could fully fund MAPS’ research into medical marijuana for PTSD. The article details the progression of HB 2333, noting that Yee intends for the money raised from Arizona’s medical marijuana program to be used toward drug prevention outreach instead of toward funding research into the medical potential of marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in veterans.  “Senator Yee is placing politics before science, and doing so at the expense of our combat veterans,” explains veteran Ricardo Pereyda. “It’s a shameful way to treat our veterans, and worse, will force many not to pursue treatment at all.”



April 1, 2014


  The Daily Chronic "Arizona Medical Marijuana Supporters to Rally for Veterans with PTSD on April 2"

The Daily Chronic announces an organized rally in support of MAPS’ research into medical marijuana for PTSD will take place on Wednesday, April 2 in Phoenix Arizona. The gathering is happening as a result of Senator Kimberly Yee’s opposition of HB 2333, a proposed bill that could fully provide funding for our proposed study of medical marijuana for PTSD. “Being able to treat multiple symptoms from post-traumatic stress with cannabis has been instrumental in my ability to lead a full and productive life,” said veteran Ricardo Pereyda, “Senator Yee is placing politics before science, and doing so at the expense of our combat veterans.”


  NBC News "‘Out of Options’: Veterans with PTSD Hit Pot Underground" by Bill Briggs.

NBC News reports that an increasing number of veterans are using marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD. The article shares passionate testimonials from veterans and highlights planned research to make marijuana into a federally legal prescription medicine. “With all of these people coming home from war, [the PTSD and veteran suicide crises] are only going to get worse.” explains veteran Sean Azzariti. “How are we going to treat that? We can’t just keep throwing pills at people.”


  Vice Australia "Why Won’t Australia Run Medical Trials of MDMA?" by Joseph Gelfer.

Vice Australia interviews Martin Williams of Psychedelic Research in Science and Medicine (PRISM) about proposals to conduct research in Australia on the potential benefits of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Williams speaks about the rising rate of PTSD in Australians, how research has provided evidence that MDMA can work as an adjunct to psychotherapy, and the difficulty of conducting psychedelic research in Australia. “MDMA-assisted psychotherapy appears to be one promising alternative to current treatment options that should be available to practitioners,” explains Williams.



March 31, 2014


  Drug Policy Alliance (DPA), Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), Students for Sensible Drug Policy (SSDP), National Organization for Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), Americans for Safe Access (ASA), Veterans for Medical Cannabis Access, and Arizona Medical Cannabis Nurses Association "PRESS RELEASE: Arizona State Senator Blocks Funding for Long-Sought Medical Marijuana Research"

After 22 years of hard-fought efforts, the non-profit pharmaceutical company Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) has finally obtained approval from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) for a FDA clinical trial to examine the medical safety and efficacy of marijuana. The trial would study military veterans suffering from treatment-resistant post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Yet the study’s ability to receive Arizona state funding is in jeopardy due to State Senator Kimberly Yee.



March 28, 2014


  Playboy "Can LSD Be Used for Medical Purposes?" by Tyler Trykowski.

Playboy publishes an update on the growing field of research into the medical potential of LSD, psilocybin, and MDMA, highlighting recently published research results into psychedelic-assisted treatments for alcoholism, nicotine addiction, and PTSD. Virginia Wright of MAPS shares her perspective about the challenges of finding government funding for psychedelic research and how stigma sometimes prevents the advancement of science.


  Intellihub "New Study Researches MDMA Therapy for Autistic Adults with Social Anxiety" by John Vibes.

Intellihub covers the initiation at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute’s of MAPS’ new study of MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in autistic adults. Charles Grob, M.D., and Alicia Danforth, Ph.D., will conduct the MAPS-sponsored study and measure how MDMA-assisted therapy affects 12 participants’ reported levels of social anxiety.


  Mixmag "MDMA Could Treat Cancer and Other Illnesses But It’s Still Demonised"

Mixmag provides an overview of past and present research into the medical and therapeutic uses of MDMA, noting that scientists believe MDMA may provide relief to people suffering from PTSD, tinnitus, depression, Parkinsons, anxiety, and cancer. “Given the positive research that has been completed so far,” writes Mixmag, “It should be taken seriously as a potential therapeutic drug whether the establishment likes it or not.”


  The Raw Story "MDMA Helps Reduce Social Anxiety for Autistic Adults, and Researchers Want to Find Out How" by Travis Gettys.

The Raw Story reports on the initiation of MAPS’ new study of MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum. The article highlights anecdotal evidence from co-investigator Alicia Danforth’s study of recreational MDMA and Ecstasy use by autistic adults, noting that for some, positive effects “lasted for a year or more.” “If the results of this research warrant further investigation, data from this study will be used to design additional clinical trials,” Danforth explains.


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Historic Shift In Federal Policy As HHS Approves Medical Marijuana Study for PTSD"

On March 14, 2014, in an historic shift in federal policy, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services granted permission for researchers to purchase research-grade marijuana from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) for a planned study of marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans.



March 27, 2014


  Reality Sandwich "MAPS Offers First Ever Online Course" by Evolver Learning Lab.

Reality Sandwich announces MAPS’ first live online video course, “Psychedelic Science: How to Apply What We’re Learning to Your Life,” a 5-week educational webinar with experts discussing how insights from conducting psychedelic research can be applied to daily life. The begins May 7 and will include Rick Doblin, Gabor Maté, Brad Burge, Rak Razam, Alicia Danforth, Linnae Ponté, Julie Megler, Clancy Cavnar, and others who presented their work at the historic Psychedelic Science 2013 conference in Oakland, California. The course will cover topics including drug addiction, psychedelic harm reduction, psychedelic-inspired art, the therapeutic use of ayahuasca, and openly communicating with your peers about psychedelics.


  Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute and MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Study Initiated Exploring MDMA-Assisted Therapy for Social Anxiety in Autistic Adults"

Seeking new therapies for the treatment of social anxiety in autistic adults, researchers at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed) announced today that they are initiating a novel study into the safety and effectiveness of MDMA-assisted therapy. The study is the latest in an expanding program of research into the therapeutic use of MDMA by the nonprofit Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS). The research seeks to examine effective treatments for adults on the autism spectrum, who often face social adaptability challenges and greater anxiety, depression, and victimization than typically developing adults.



March 26, 2014


  NBC 7 San Diego "Can Ecstasy Treat PTSD?" by Bridget Naso.

A family tells NBC 7 San Diego why they believe that MDMA-assisted psychotherapy could have prevented the suicide of their son Daniel, a U.S. Army veteran diagnosed with PTSD. Howard and Jean Somers explain how a overflowing drawer of prescription medications did not help their son, nor did psychotherapy. “If this is something that will stave a suicide—that will hold that off for a day—it’s worth it,” declares mother Jean Somers.



March 25, 2014


  Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News "Psychedelics Shown to Relieve Anxiety" by Alex Philippidis.

Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News highlights recent breakthroughs in psychedelic research, noting that studies into the therapeutic potential of LSD, MDMA, ayahuasca, and psilocybin have reached a level of prominence unseen in decades. Brad Burge of MAPS speaks about the fading taboo surrounding psychedelic, how MAPS’ psychedelic research is funded entirely by donations, and how further research into psychedelic-assisted therapy may reveal beneficial uses for treating PTSD and other medical conditions.


  Nature "Federal Red Tape Ties Up Marijuana Research" by Helen Shen.

Nature explores the breaking down of political interference that has been preventing researchers from effectively studying the medical potential of marijuana. The article details MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley’s successful efforts to receive permission from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to purchase research-grade marijuana for MAPS’ FDA-approved study of medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD.


  Santa Cruz Good Times Weekly "Historic Shift in Drug Research" by April M. Short.

The Santa Cruz Good Times Weekly looks at the recent government approval of a study to investigate medical marijuana to treat PTSD symptoms in 70 U.S. veterans. After receiving final approval from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency, the study will be conducted at the University of Arizona by MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley. “If it can be shown that marijuana helps reduce depression and suicidality,” explains Brad Burge of MAPS, “then we can save a lot of lives.”


  Military Times "Research OK’d Into Effects of Pot on PTSD Symptoms" by Patricia Kime .

Military Times covers MAPS’ plans to study medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans. The study has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which will allow researchers to purchase research-grade marijuana from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) once final approval is obtained from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency. “We have thousands of years of history of human use of this drug,” notes Brad Burge of MAPS. “Far more years than SSRIs.”


  Arizona Daily Wildcat "UA Doctor’s Medical Marijuana Study Lacks Funding" by Brittny Mejia.

The Arizona Daily Wildcat highlights how an FDA-approved study into the medical potential of marijuana is facing funding obstacles due to Arizona State Senator Kimberly Yee’s blocking of HB 2333, an Arizona bill that could provide $250,000 in funding for the study. The article features quotes about the importance of improving our scientific understanding of marijuana from policymaker Ethan Orr, researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, and veteran Ricardo Pereyda. “I’ve got veterans across the country that are depending on us at the U of A now,” explains MAPS-sponsored researcher Sisley. “I don’t want to disappoint them.”



March 24, 2014


  My Chronic Relief "NIDA Approves Medical Cannabis Study for PTSD"

My Chronic Relief commends University of Arizona researcher Dr. Sue Sisley and MAPS for their persistence in pushing for government approval for marijuana research, highlighting that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has approved their request to purchase research-grade marijuana for an FDA-approved study into the potential benefits of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in U.S. veterans. The article explains the final steps to be completed before the study can begin, explaining that the researchers still require DEA approval and a source of funding.



March 23, 2014


  The San Francisco Chronicle "Pot To Be Tested as Remedy For Post-traumatic Stress Disorder" by Stacy Finz.

The front page of The San Francisco Chronicle underscores the unprecedented momentum for research into marijuana and psychedelics as treatments for PTSD. The article notes that MAPS’ FDA-approved study of the potential benefits of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans has received approval from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. “It’s 100 percent fantastic,” explains MAPS executive director Rick Doblin. “For 22 years I’ve been trying to study marijuana and make it a medicine. So this is a massive step.”



March 22, 2014


  Arizona Family "Ariz. Senator Stalls Medical Marijuana Research Bill" by Dennis Welch.

Arizona Family explains how Arizona State Senator Kimberly Yee has refused to consider a bill that could provide up to $250,000 in funding for MAPS’ government-approved study of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD. MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley speaks about the abundance of anecdotal reports that serve as the inspiration for her research. “Nobody’s suggesting this is a cure for PTSD, but it does seem to be extremely useful in managing day-to-day symptoms,” explains Sisley.



March 21, 2014


  Washington Post "Marijuana Research Hampered By Access From Government And Politics, Scientists Say" by Ariana E. Cha.

The Washington Post explores how scientists are overcoming political obstacles surrounding medical marijuana research. The article explores the past and future of medical marijuana, looking at the variety of medical conditions that may benefit from it. “If research shows that marijuana is an effective medical treatment, it could force the federal government’s hand on reclassifying it,” explains Washington Post writer Ariana Cha.


  KJZZ "Medical Marijuana For PTSD Bill Faces GOP Challenge" by Dennis Lambert.

KJZZ offers a glimpse at the political climate surrounding HB 2333, an Arizona bill that could provide $250,000 in funding for MAPS’ FDA-approved research into the potential benefits of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD. The article notes that Arizona State senator Kimberly Yee is using her political power to block the bill from advancing, providing a delay in researching ways to help our veteran population suffering from PTSD. “This should not be an ego battle. This should be a way to get good policy to the governor’s desk,” Arizona State Rep. Ethan Orr said.


  East Valley Tribune "State Senator Putting End to Marijuana Study Bill" by Howard Fischer.

East Valley Tribune reports on Arizona state Senator Kimberly Yee’s blockade of HB 2333, a proposed bill in the Arizona legislature that could provide funding for MAPS’ proposed research into the benefits of medical marijuana to treat PTSD. “What I’m contending is the private donors have already paid into a fund to support research,” says MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley. “We just need to have the opportunity to access it.”



March 20, 2014


  Fox 7 Austin "Killeen Veteran Hopeful as Study on Marijuana for PTSD Gets Green Light"

Fox 7 Austin highlights a veteran’s testimonial in support of MAPS’ planned study of the benefits of medical marijuana for symptoms of PTSD. “Every veteran who has used cannabis as an alternative to medication, to opiates and to psychotropic drugs testifies that cannabis was very effective, much less dangerous,” says veteran Dave Bass, Director of Veterans Outreach for Texas NORML. “You can’t overdose on it.”


  The Los Angeles Times "Letters: PTSD and MDMA" by James M. Bivins.

The Los Angeles Times publishes a reader’s positive response to previous coverage of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD. The letter of support comes from James M. Bivins, a Navy nurse who has worked with many veterans who suffer from PTSD. Bivins speaks about the “exciting” potential of using MDMA as an adjunct to therapy, noting, “It makes sense that psychotherapy would work better as a result. More studies on this, please.”


  Tucson Weekly "Stress Study Success" by J.M. Smith.

J.M. Smith of Tucson Weekly writes an editorial about Arizona state Senator Kimberly Yee’s refusal to allow the progression of a bill that could fund MAPS’ FDA-approved study into the benefits of medical marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans. Smith highlights MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley’s continued efforts to bring this study to fruition over the course of three years. “It looks like she is well on her way to helping Arizona veterans find relief.” writes Smith. “Wouldn’t that be awesome? Why yes, it would be awesome. Very awesome.”



March 19, 2014


  FOX 10 Phoenix "State Senator Blocks Medical Marijuana Study" by Steve Krafft.

FOX 10 Phoenix reports that a new bill to fund medical marijuana research in Arizona is facing political resistance from Arizona state senator Kimberly Yee. The bill to fund the study has been approved by the Arizona House with a vote of 52 to 5, though Yee is attempting to use her power to stop the Senate Education Committee from considering the bill at all. MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley explains how veterans reacted upon hearing about Yee’s actions, noting, “When they heard this week Kimberly Yee was refusing to allow this bill on her education committee agenda they were astounded, they were angered.”


  McClatchy Washington Bureau "Feds Accused of Steering Funding to Anti-Pot Researchers" by Rob Hotakainen.

McClatchy Washington Bureau provides an overview of the current state of marijuana research, highlighting recent government approval of MAPS’ planned study of the potential benefits of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD. The article interviews representatives from MAPS and NIDA, allowing a fair look at the merits of marijuana research. MAPS-sponsored Sue Sisley speaks about her plans to conduct the study upon receiving final approval from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency. “Sisley said she’s excited to get started and hopes to launch the project late this spring or early this summer,” writes Rob Hotakainen of McClatchy Washington Bureau.


  University Herald "Federal Government Approves Marijuana Study For Veterans With PTSD" by Jaleesa Baulkman.

University Herald notes the significance of the Department of Health and Human Services’ approval of MAPS’ planned study of marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in U.S. veterans. The article provides details about how the FDA-approved study will be conducted at the University of Arizona. Jaleesa Baulkman of University Herald writes that the study will help provide a better scientific understand of medical marijuana, noting that “Physicians have long speculated that medical marijuana use would help to calm the parts of the brain affected by PTSD.”



March 18, 2014


  Motherboard "With Long-Sought Federal Approvals, Psychedelic Research Is Finally Rolling" by Brian Anderson.

Motherboard showcases the recent wave of success for government-approved research into the medical benefits of Schedule I substances such as LSD and marijuana. To illustrate the momentum, the article highlights the Department of Health and Human Services’ March 14, 2014, approval of research into the potential benefits of medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD in veterans and the March 4, 2014, publication of promising results from research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. “Psychedelic drugs, it seems, are having a bit of a moment,” muses Brian Anderson of Motherboard.


  HuffPost Live "New Studies Show LSD Reduces Anxiety" by Ricky Camilleri.

HuffPost Live interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin, PhD, David Nichols, PhD, and John Halpern, MD, about the recently published results from MAPS’ study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. The experts speak about the variety of conditions that can potentially benefit from psychedelic-assisted therapy and share their perspectives on the past, present, and future of research in this area.


  The Joe Rogan Experience "Joe Rogan Experience #470 - Amber Lyon" by Joe Rogan.

Joe Rogan speaks with three-time Emmy Award-winning journalist and filmmaker Amber Lyon of Reset.Me about her investigative reporting on the therapeutic potential of psychedelics, highlighting both clinical research results and their personal experiences. Lyon speaks at length about her transition from providing mainstream coverage for CNN to becoming an independent journalist focusing on the use of psychedelics in cultures worldwide. She highlights how her own ayahuasca experiences facilitated her spiritual growth, as well as some of the dangers of taking ayahuasca in unsafe settings.


  New Zealand Doctor "Range of Cures Likely For Tinnitus"

New Zealand Doctor writes about research into treatments for tinnitus, noting that some researchers believe that MDMA can help reduce tinnitus symptoms. The article highlights MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin and MAPS Director of Clinical Research Amy Emerson’s presentation at the Tinnitus Research Initiative conference in New Zealand on March 12, 2014, about their observations from current MDMA research suggesting that additional studies into MDMA as a tinnitus treatment may be warranted.


  Phoenix New Times "UA Study on Pot and PTSD Could Impact Arizona’s Medical Marijuana Program" by Matthew Hendley.

Phoenix New Times gives details about the progress of MAPS’ FDA-approved medical marijuana research, set to be conducted at the University of Arizona by Dr. Sue Sisley. The article notes that MAPS has been attempting to purchase research-grade marijuana from the government for over 22 years, highlighting that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services granted researchers permission to purchase research-grade marijuana from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) on On March 14, 2014. The article details the medical marijuana program in Arizona, noting petitions to add PTSD, depression, and anxiety disorders as qualifying conditions have been rejected due to lack of research. “Without the evidence, neither the panel nor the AZDHS director were in favor of adding the conditions to the list.” writes Matthew Hendley of Phoenix New Times. “Perhaps that would change, pending the outcome of that UA research.”


  Huffington Post "What Psychedelic Research Can Teach Us About Mental Health" by Natalie Ginsberg.

Natalie Ginsberg of the Drug Policy Alliance writes for the Huffington Post about how the resurgence of research into the therapeutic potential of LSD, MDMA, and psilocybin is contributing to the development of new treatments for a variety of medical conditions. “Further research is desperately needed to quell the unbearable pain of hundreds of thousands of individuals,” declares Ginsberg. “As well as to continue illuminating the mysteries of mental illness and brain function.”


  Psychedelic Salon "MDMA and Autistic Adults: A New Research Study"

Psychedelic Salon shares the audio recording of MAPS-sponsored researcher Alicia Danforth’s presentation during Burning Man 2013 at the Palenque Norte Lecture Series about her work investigating the effects of MDMA on autistic adults. The podcast concludes with a discussion between Danforth and Dr. Charles Grob about the upcoming MAPS-sponsored study of MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum.


  Motherboard "How the World’s Foremost Psychedelic Researchers Finally Got Some Weed to Study" by Thor Benson.

Motherboard covers recent developments in medical marijuana research for PTSD, noting that MAPS’ FDA-approved study has received approval from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin is interviewed about the previous obstacles surrounding MAPS’ 22-year effort to start medical marijuana drug development research, and the differences between MDMA-assisted psychotherapy and medical marijuana as PTSD treatments.


  High Times "Feds Relent On Long-Delayed Pot For PTSD Study" by Paul Armentano.

High Times writes about the U.S. Health and Human Services’ March 14, 2014, approval of MAPS’ protocol for a study of effects of medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD in U.S. veterans. The article details previous political obstacles surrounding the commencement of this research and explores other studies looking into the medical potential of marijuana. “Regulators at the US National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the federal agency that must approve the use of cannabis in any FDA-approved clinical study, have consistently stood in the way. That is, until this month,” explains Paul Armentano of High Times.


  USA Today "Medical Marijuana Research for PTSD Clears Major Hurdle" by Jolie Lee.

USA Today reports on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ approval for MAPS to purchase the marijuana for a controlled study of medical marijuana as a treatment for PTSD in U.S. veterans. The article interviews University of Arizona researcher Dr. Sue Sisley and Brad Burge of MAPS about the current state of medical marijuana research, the need for more effective PTSD treatments, and the pathway to turning the whole marijuana plant into a prescription drug.



March 17, 2014


  Hemp.org "U.S.: Federal Government Approves Medical Marijuana Research For PTSD" by Steve Elliott.

Hemp.org highlights researchers’ efforts to conduct an FDA-approved study into the effects and potential benefits of smoked or vaporized medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD, noting that recent approval from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has pushed the research closer to commencing than ever before. “The political dynamics are shifting,” explains MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin.


  Camp Verde Bugle "UA Could Move To Forefront Of Medical Marijuana Research" by Howard Fischer.

The Camp Verde Bugle writes about the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’s March 14, 2014 approval of research into the potential benefits of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in U.S. veterans. The article details the study protocol and highlights the shift in public perception of medical marijuana. MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley explains why it is important that this study recruits participants diagnosed with treatment-resistant PTSD, noting more effective treatments must be explored. “All these folks have gone through all the standard conventional meds,” Sisley said.


  Military.com "Marijuana Study In Veterans Wins US Backing"

Military.com reports that MAPS’ FDA-approved study of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in veterans has received approval from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. After a four and a half month review process, MAPS now has permission to purchase research-grade medical marijuana from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the only provider of marijuana for government-approved research. The study will be conducted by Dr. Sue Sisley and will begin after receiving final approval from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency.


  Business Insider "How The Main Ingredient In A Party Drug Could Help Veterans With PTSD" by Jeremy Bender.

Business Insider reports that research into the benefits of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is showing promise and increasing worldwide. The article highlights a government-approved study led by MAPS Clinical Investigator Michael Mithoefer, M.D., which is currently investigating the effects of the treatment on veterans, firefighters, and police officers suffering from service-related PTSD.


  FOX 10 Phoenix "Marijuana Study in Veterans Wins Federal Backing"

FOX 10 Phoenix reports on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ approval of MAPS’ study of medical marijuana for PTSD. “There’s a hundred different scenarios that will run through my head at any given time, and using cannabis quiets that,” notes veteran Ricardo Pereyda. “It allows me to be able to go throughout my day being productive.”


  Reason "HHS Approves Marijuana Study for Veterans With PTSD" by Elizabeth Nolan Brown.

Reason notes the significance of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ approval of research into the potential benefits of medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD in veterans. After their second protocol submission, researchers waited over four and a half months for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to grant permission for researchers to purchase marijuana from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. “Researchers, advocates, and general folks for sensible drug policy hope it’s a signal that federal attitudes toward drug research are starting to shift,” writes Reason staff editor Elizabeth Nolan Brown.


  Associated Press "Marijuana Study in Veterans Wins Federal Backing" by Matthew Perone.

The Associated Press announces that MAPS’ FDA-approved study of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in veterans has received approval from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. After a four and a half month review process, MAPS now has permission to purchase research-grade medical marijuana from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the only provider of marijuana for government-approved research. The study will be conducted by Dr. Sue Sisley and will begin after receiving final approval from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency.



March 16, 2014


  AlterNet "Historic Shift in U.S. Drug Policy: Public Health Service Approves Medical Marijuana Study" by April M. Short.

AlterNet reports on the major shift in U.S. policy allowing researchers to purchase marijuana for a study measuring the benefits of treating symptoms of PTSD with medical marijuana. The proposed study has now received approval from the FDA, an IRB, and the Department of Health and Human Services, and is awaiting final approval from the DEA. “While many vets are calling for increased access to marijuana medicine,” writes AlterNet editor April Short, “the study in question would be the first-ever controlled, clinical study to look at using marijuana to treat PTSD in human patients.”


  Stars and Stripes "Exploring Therapeutic Effects of MDMA on Post-Traumatic Stress" by Alan Zarembo.

Stars and Stripes puts the spotlight on how international researchers and independent therapists are finding benefits in MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD. Through interviews with therapists, veterans, and researchers, the article takes a skeptical stance while underscoring the importance of further research. “I feel like I found meaning again,” says U.S. Army veteran Tim Amoroso, who used MDMA on his own and found that it helped his PTSD symptoms. “My life wasn’t as bad as I thought it was.”



March 15, 2014


  Los Angeles Times "Exploring Therapeutic Effects of MDMA on Post-Traumatic Stress" by Alan Zarembo.

The Los Angeles Times puts the spotlight on how international researchers and independent therapists are finding benefits in MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD. Through interviews with therapists, veterans, and researchers, the article takes a skeptical stance while underscoring the importance of further research. “I feel like I found meaning again,” says U.S. Army veteran Tim Amoroso, who used MDMA on his own and found that it helped his PTSD symptoms. “My life wasn’t as bad as I thought it was.”



March 14, 2014


  Medscape "LSD for Anxiety: Hallucinogen as Treatment Revisited" by Fran Lowry.

Medscape gives a comprehensive overview of the first study of the therapeutic use of LSD in over 40 years. The results, published in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, indicate that a full 200 microgram dose of LSD in conjunction with psychotherapy can be safely administered and can help reduce anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. The article covers everything from study design to music selection and features an interview with Gasser. “I’m quite satisfied with the results,”  explains Gasser. “Because the most important thing after a stop of 35 years of research is that we could show that LSD is safe and effective.”


  Los Angeles Times "Government Approves Medical Marijuana Research" by Evan Halper and Cindy Carcamo.

The Los Angeles Times is the first to report on the approval of our planned study of marijuana for symptoms of PTSD by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. After waiting over four and a half months for a response to our October 24, 2013, protocol resubmission, HHS finally granted approval for MAPS to purchase marijuana from the National Institute on Drug Abuse on March 14, 2014. MAPS has been attempting to purchase marijuana for medical marijuana drug development research for over 22 years. “This is a great day,” said University Arizona researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, who will lead the study. “The merits of a rigorous scientific trial have finally trumped politics.”

Much more news coverage at MAPS in the Media.



March 13, 2014


  Guardian Liberty "Study Brings LSD Back Into the Spotlight" by Gabriela Motroc.

Guardian Liberty shares the published results of MAPS’ study of the benefits of LSD-assisted psychotherapy for anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. The study was conducted in Switzerland by Dr. Peter Gasser, who found a 20% reduction in anxiety scores in the eight participants who received the full 200-microgram dose. Gabriela Motroc of Guardian Liberty declares that the completion of the study and the promising results have brought LSD “back into the spotlight.”



March 11, 2014


  The Big Picture with Thom Hartmann "LSD for the Dying?" by Thom Hartmann.

The Big Picture with Thom Hartmann invites April Short of AlterNet to speak about the significance of newly published LSD-assisted psychotherapy research results. Short notes that participants who received the full 200 microgram dose of LSD in the context of a controlled psychotherapy session reported a 20% reduction in levels of anxiety after their sessions.



March 9, 2014


  Stuff "Party Drug Link to Tinnitus ‘Cure’" by Shabnam Dastgheib.

Stuff highlights new work by Auckland researchers to start a study of MDMA for reducing symptoms of tinnitus. “In our study of veterans, some of them have tinnitus and report that MDMA-assisted psychotherapy had the unexpected benefit of reducing tinnitus to some extent,” explains MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. “Perhaps people with tinnitus under the influence of MDMA can relate differently to their tinnitus so it recedes to some extent into the background.”


  NPR "The ‘60s Are Gone, But Psychedelic Research Trip Continues" by NPR Staff.

NPR explores psychedelic science, looking at how researchers are studying the therapeutic potential of psychedelic substances after a decades-long hiatus. The article highlights the development of a protocol to study the effects of MDMA-assisted therapy to treat social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum and interviews Clinical Investigator Charles Grob. “I believe we are on the threshold of some very exciting discoveries that the health field can only benefit from,” explains Grob.


  The Times of India "LSD Can Help Ease Fear of Death" by Steve Connor.

The Times of India highlights the completion of LSD-assisted psychotherapy research conducted in Switzerland by MAPS Principal Investigator Dr. Peter Gasser. The results from the study were published in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease and indicate that subjects given a full dose of LSD experienced significant reductions in anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. “All of them said after 12 months of taking the drug that it was worth taking part in the trial and they would come again if asked,” explains Gasser. “They also said they would recommend it for other people in the same position as themselves.”


  Gawker "Doctors Are Reconsidering LSD" by Gabrielle Bluestone.

Gawker writes about the first controlled study of the therapeutic use of LSD in over 40 years, highlighting results indicating that study participants diagnosed with advanced-stage illness had a statistically significant reduction in anxiety after receiving a 200 microgram dose of LSD in conjunction with psychotherapy. The article notes that the participants who received the full dose of LSD noted a 20% improvement in anxiety that was maintained at the one-year follow-up.


  AlterNet "LSD Can Ease Anxiety for Dying Patients" by April M. Short.

AlterNet provides an overview of newly completed research into the medical potential of LSD-assisted psychotherapy. The results, published in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, indicate that LSD-assisted psychotherapy can be safely administered and can help reduce anxiety associated with treat advanced-stage illness. The article covers the history of this LSD research, describes the study protocol, and shares quotes from researchers and a study participant.



March 8, 2014


  Digital Journal "LSD Relieved Dying Patients’ Anxiety in First Tests in Decades" by Brett Wilkins.

Digital Journal writes about the monumental reemergence of research into the therapeutic potential of LSD after a 40 year hiatus. The article interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about the broad implications of the results from new research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. “The stigma against psychedelic research is finally lifting, and we’re getting concrete results showing that psychedelics can be safely and effectively used in the context of therapy,” Burge explains. “Like any drug, LSD has risks as well as benefits, and we’re finding the safest and most beneficial ways to use it.”


  TEDx Santa Cruz "Science Not Fear - Drug Policy and Medical Research: Virginia Wright at TEDx Santa Cruz" by Virginia Wright.

TEDx Santa Cruz hosts Virginia Wright of MAPS to speak about the promise of psychedelic research, how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can help people overcome PTSD, and how drug policy could be dictated by science instead of fear. “We need to use science, compassion, and not fear to understand these drugs so that we can help heal people,” explains Wright.



March 6, 2014


  The Independent "First Scientific Study of LSD in 40 Years Shows Positive Therapeutic Results" by James Vincent.

The Independent reports that new research into the therapeutic potential of LSD has produced results indicating that LSD-assisted psychotherapy can reduce anxiety associated with advanced stage illness. “The study was a success in the sense that we did not have any noteworthy adverse effects,” explains Principal Investigator Peter Gasser, who conducted the research in Switzerland. “All participants reported a personal benefit from the treatment, and the effects were stable over time.”


  The Huffington Post "First LSD Study In 40 Years Shows Promising Medical Uses" by Emily Thomas.

The Huffington Post reports that recently published research into the effectiveness of LSD-assisted psychotherapy is the first study of the therapeutic use of LSD in over 40 years. MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin is interviewed about the results of the study and the role of LSD in science and politics. “The political suppression of this research is over,” pronounces Doblin. “I don’t think the genie is going to be put back in the bottle.”


  Intellectual Gentlemen's Club "Intellectual Gentlemen’s Club Interviews Brad Burge and Dennis McKenna" by Jason Abbott.

The Intellectual Gentlemen’s Club interviews ethnobotanist Dennis McKenna and Brad Burge of MAPS about the current state of scientific research into the potential medical benefits of LSD, MDMA, psilocybin, and ayahuasca.


  News AM "LSD for Therapy"

News AM highlights results from new research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. The article details the protocol for the LSD study and shares affirming experiences reported by study participants. “After about two months of weekly therapy, the eight participants who received full doses of LSD improved,” notes the article.


  The Fix "LSD Used In Drug Therapy For First Time In Four Decades" by McCarton Ackerman.

The Fix highlights the publication of LSD research results in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, noting that scientists have found that LSD-assisted psychotherapy can help reduce anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin explains how this research can change public perception of psychedelics, stating, “We want to break these substances out of the mold of the counterculture and bring them back to the lab as part of a psychedelic renaissance.”



March 5, 2014


  Discover Magazine "First LSD Study in 40 Years Finds Therapeutic Potential" by Carl Engelking.

Discover Magazine covers the historic publication of results from the first study of the therapeutic use of LSD in more than four decades. Researchers note that subjects receiving a full dose of LSD during psychotherapy experienced statistically significant reductions in anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. “My LSD experience brought back some lost emotions and ability to trust, lots of psychological insights, and a timeless moment when the universe didn’t seem like a trap, but like a revelation of utter beauty,” said one study participant.


  The Los Angeles Times "First Trial of LSD as Medicine in 40 Years Shows Promise" by Melissa Healy.

The Los Angeles Times highlights this week’s published results from the first therapeutic study of LSD in more than four decades, showing that can be safely administered in a controlled setting and can help reduce anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. The study was conducted over a span of 4 years in Switzerland by MAPS Principal Investigator Dr. Peter Gasser, and the results were published in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. The article shares specific details from the study, analyzes results, and covers the history of LSD’s original role in therapy and science.


  The Verge "Acid Test: LSD Used as Drug Therapy for the First Time in 40 Years" by Arielle Duhaime-Ross.

The Verge provides an overview of new research into the medical potential of LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. The article highlights the results of the study, noting, “A year after the sessions ceased, the patients who had received a full dose of LSD — 200 micrograms — experienced a 20 percent improvement in their anxiety levels.”


  International Business Times "Can LSD Reduce Anxiety? First Human Trial In Decades Shows Potential Benefits Of Psychedelic Drug" by Zoe Mintz.

International Business Times reports that scientists have published promising new results from research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy, noting that the treatment can be safely administered in a controlled, therapeutic context. The results from the study indicate that talk therapy combined with LSD can help reduce anxiety associated with advanced stage to a significant degree.


  New York Daily News "First LSD Study In More Than 40 Years Shows Reduced Anxiety In Terminally Ill" by Deborah Hastings.

New York Daily News reports that results published in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease indicate that LSD-assisted psychotherapy can help reduce anxiety in subjects diagnosed with advanced-stage illness. The study notes the positive outcome of the study, explaining, “Those who received full dosages of LSD reported their feelings of anxiety dropped by about 20%.”


  PolicyMic "Swiss LSD Study Yields Incredible Results for Terminally Ill Patients" by Victoria Kim.

PolicyMic details how researchers have completed the first study of the therapeutic use of LSD in over 40 years, noting that LSD can be safely administered in a controlled clinical context. The article notes that the new research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy produced results indicating that anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness can be reduced after receiving two sessions of talk therapy combined with LSD.


  Live Science "Good Trip? LSD May Ease Anxiety" by Marc Lallanilla.

Live Science showcases how scientists are researching the therapeutic potential psychedelic substances including LSD, MDMA, and psilocybin and finding promising results. The article highlights the recent publication of results from research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat advanced-stage illness and notes that research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy is also producing inspiring results.


  The Dish "Psychedelics As Medicine" by Andrew Sullivan.

The Dish writes about how scientists are exploring the concept of psychedelic medicine, noting that researchers have recently completed studies into LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness and studies into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).


  Now This News "Study: LSD Works as Anxiety Therapy"

Now This News creates a video overview of the history of LSD research, noting that results from new research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy indicate that the treatment method can help reduce anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness.


  CTV News "LSD-Assisted Therapy May Help Reduce Anxiety, Study Finds" by Marlene Leung.

CTV News looks into the revival of research into the therapeutic potential of LSD, highlighting how new study results indicate that LSD-assisted psychotherapy can help reduce anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. “This study is historic and marks a rebirth of investigation into LSD-assisted psychotherapy,” notes MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin. “The positive results and evidence of safety clearly show why additional, larger studies are needed.”


  Motherboard "Scientists Are (Finally) Studying LSD Again" by DJ Pangburn.

Motherboard remarks on the significance of reemerging scientific research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics, showcasing results from the MAPS-sponsored study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced stage illness. In a paper published in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, the study author’s explain the promising results and make a call for expanded research, stating, “Further study is warranted into the potential of LSD-assisted psychotherapy.”



March 4, 2014


  Medical Daily "LSD May Help Treat Anxiety For Terminal Patients: Are The Psychedelic’s Benefits Worth Revisiting?" by Anthony Rivas.

Medical Daily details the history of research into the medical potential of LSD and highlights the completion and results of the MAPS-sponsored study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for advanced-stage illness. The article notes the progression of interest in psychedelic therapy, stating, “Psychiatrists in the U.S. and abroad are starting to see that the drug may be worth revisiting — the patients certainly think so.”


  Reason.tv "MDMA for PTSD: How Ecstasy Is Helping People with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder" by Paul Feine and Alex Manning.

Reason.tv gives an investigative report on research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, through original interviews with MAPS Clinical Investigator Michael Mithoefer, M.D., MAPS Founder Rick Doblin, Ph.D., and a veteran who shares his view on how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can help people suffering from PTSD.


  TIME "LSD Therapy Lowers Anxiety, Study Finds" by Alexandra Sifferlin.

TIME covers the publication of study results in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease indicating that LSD-assisted psychotherapy can help reduce anxiety associated with life-threatening disease. The MAPS-sponsored study was conducted in Switzerland by Dr. Peter Gasser and found that anxiety levels improved by 20% in volunteers who received a full dose of LSD.


  Waking Times "First Study in 40 Years Legitimizes LSD for Psychotherapeutic Use" by Buck Rogers.

Waking Times analyzes the recent renaissance of research into the potential medical benefits of psychedelics, highlighting how the publication of results from new research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness is helping reduce the stigma surrounding psychedelics. Buck Rogers of Waking Times notes, “Legitimate and positive scientific research is the key that can unlock long-held cultural taboos and misunderstandings about the nature of psychoactive substances.”


  The Raw Story "First LSD Tests in Decades Show Terminal Patients Gained Valuable and Lasting Insights" by Travis Gettys.

The Raw Story shares results from a double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. Dr. Peter Gasser conducted the study in Switzerland and worked with 12 participants. Gasser explains the results that he observed and measured in study participants receiving the full dose of LSD as an adjunct to psychotherapy, noting, “Their anxiety went down and stayed down.”


  Forbes "First Study Of LSD’s Psychotherapeutic Benefits In Four Decades Breaks Research Taboo" by Jacob Sullum.

Forbes reports on today’s publication of the results from the first therapeutic study of LSD in over 40 years in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. The Swiss study was led by Principal Investigator Peter Gasser, M.D. and monitored the anxiety levels of volunteers diagnosed with life-threatening diseases before and after receiving LSD-assisted psychotherapy. The article summarizes the study protocol and results, noting that the treatment was safely administered and resulted in statistically significant reductions in anxiety among participants. “These results indicate that when administered safely in a methodologically rigorous medically supervised psychotherapeutic setting, LSD can reduce anxiety,” explains Gasser.


  The New York Times "LSD, Reconsidered for Therapy" by Benedict Carey.

The New York Times announces today’s publication of the results from MAPS’ completed Swiss study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy for anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. The study, published online in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, is the first study of the therapeutic use of LSD in humans in over 40 years. The double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study in 12 subjects found statistically significant reductions in anxiety following two LSD-assisted psychotherapy sessions. The results also indicate that LSD-assisted psychotherapy can be safely administered in these subjects, and justify further research. “It’s a proof of concept,” MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin explains. “It shows that this kind of trial can be done safely, and that it’s very much worth doing.”


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: LSD Study Breaks 40 Years of Research Taboo"

On March 4, 2014, the results of the first study of the therapeutic use of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in humans in over 40 years were published online in the peer-reviewed Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. Sponsored by the non-profit Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), the double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study in 12 subjects with advanced-stage illness found statistically significant reductions in anxiety following two LSD-assisted psychotherapy sessions.



March 1, 2014


  O’Shaughnessy’s "NIH Director Francis Collins —Ignorant, Dishonest, or Both?" by Fred Gardner.

Fred Gardner of O’Shaughnessy’s refutes comments about medical marijuana made by National Institute of Health Director Francis Collins in a recent USA Today article. The article notes that Collins lacks a fundamental understanding of what research has been completed. “Sad to see such willful ignorance,” laments MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. “As for the lack of research, it’s now been 4 months and 1 week that the Public Health Service reviewers have been sitting on MAPS’ marijuana/PTSD protocol.”



February 28, 2014


  AlterNet "Psychedelic Science Org’s 14-Year Headache of Trying to Buy Pot From the Feds" by April M. Short.

April Short of AlterNet gives a full overview of how MAPS’ FDA-approved protocol for medical marijuana research is facing obstructions from governmental agencies. “We’re hoping with this pressure, with enough public attention, HHS will make a statement or Obama—especially given his recent statements on medical marijuana—will decide to eliminate the hold, and to eliminate the process,” says Brad Burge of MAPS. “Something tells me this news about actual research being obstructed may come as a surprise to many.”



February 27, 2014


  Waking Times "Support the Troops – Let Them Treat PTSD with Cannabis" by Alex Pietrowski.

Waking Times examines how MAPS’ FDA and IRB-approved protocol for research into marijuana for treating PTSD in veterans is being blocked by the U.S. Public Health Service. “The fact that the government would prevent research of a natural medicine for the cure of PTSD speaks volumes about our government’s overall lack of interest in a genuine commitment to the mental health and wellness of our soldiers after returning from combat zones,” explains article author Alex Pietrowski.


  Mint Press News "Feds Block FDA-Approved PTSD-Marijuana Research" by Katie Rucke.

Mint Press News sheds light on how political obstacles are blocking medical marijuana research. The article notes that the FDA and Institutional Review Board-approved protocol for this research has been put on hold for over four months by the U.S. Public Health Service review process, delaying the advancement of scientific knowledge about marijuana and PTSD. “This groundbreaking research could assist doctors in how to recommend treatment for PTSD patients who have been unresponsive to traditional therapies,” explains MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin.


  Foreword Reviews "Book Review: Manifesting Minds" by Patty Sutherland.

Foreword Reviews takes a look at Manifesting Minds, the anthology of articles from the MAPS Bulletin released last month. The review highlights thought-provoking content from Manifesting Minds and describes the book as “an ode to all things psychedelic.”



February 24, 2014


  High Times "Feds Won’t Supply Pot for PTSD/Marijuana Research" by Mike Adams.

High Times reviews how MAPS’ FDA-approved study of medical marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in veterans is being blocked by the U.S. Public Health Service. The article notes that over 14 weeks have passed since the protocol was resubmitted to the PHS for approval, showing that this unnecessary review process hinders the advancement of science and medicine. “If the PHS review requirement was removed,” says MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, “we would gather information that could help veterans today. The stifling of medical research on marijuana stands in the way of our vets returning to a normal life.“



February 21, 2014


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Public Health Service Blocking FDA-Approved Medical Marijuana Research for PTSD"

A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and University of Arizona Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved protocol for a study of marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in U.S. veterans, sponsored by the non-profit Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), has been on hold for over 3½ months, as researchers wait for the PHS to respond to their request to purchase marijuana for the study.



February 20, 2014


  The Nexian "Rick Doblin Asks the Government About Their Obstruction of Cannabis Research" by David Nickles.

The Nexian explains how MAPS’ FDA-approved study of marijuana for treating symptoms of PTSD cannot begin due to obstacles put in place by the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). The article highlights MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin’s recent letter to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services explaining how research can only move forward if the PHS protocol review process ends and/or the NIDA monopoly on marijuana ends.



February 18, 2014


  Marie Claire "The New Power Trip: Inside the World of Ayahuasca" by Abby Aguirre.

Abby Aguirre writes for Marie Claire about the increase of public interest in ayahuasca, detailing the history, culture, and science surrounding the psychedelic brew. Aguirre shares insights gleaned from her ayahuasca experience, interviews researchers about the therapeutic potential of ayahuasca, and calls attention to how ayahuasca retreats are rapidly becoming the newest health fad.



February 14, 2014


  Reality Sandwich "The Second Psychedelic Revolution Part One: The End of Acid" by James Oroc.

Author James Oroc writes for Reality Sandwich about how psychedelic research education positively influences the cultural perception of psychedelics. Oroc defines some of the elements contributing to these changes. “We can witness psychedelic research slowly but surely re-entering the universities and research labs,” he writes, “thanks to: the vision and persistence of Rick Doblin and MAPS.”


  AlterNet "Cannabis University Trains Vets to Grow, Sell and Advocate for Pot Medicine" by April M. Short.

AlterNet reports that Oaksterdam University has launched a new scholarship fund to provide veterans with an extensive education about the science, politics, history, and careers surrounding medical marijuana. The article makes it clear that MAPS’ proposed research into the effects of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in veterans is continuing to face governmental obstacles, noting that over three months have passed since the study protocol has been resubmitted for review without receiving a response from the government.



February 13, 2014


  Intellectual Gentlemen's Club "Intellectual Gentleman’s Club Interviews Veteran Tim Amoroso" by Jason Abbott and Matt Abbott.

The Intellectual Gentlemen’s Club interviews U.S. Army veteran Tim Amoroso about his experience serving in the military, returning home with PTSD, and how his non-clinical experiences with psychedelics changed his relationship with PTSD. Amoroso and the show’s hosts discuss the risks and benefits of psychedelic experiences, share their perspectives on the history of psychedelic research, and offer their hopes for future legal uses of psychedelics.



February 12, 2014


  The Stream "Psychedelic Drugs: Harmful or Therapeutic?"

The Stream explores the current status of research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin shares promising results from completed psychedelic research and Rachel Hope speaks about how being a study participant in MAPS’ study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy helped her overcome treatment-resistant PTSD.



February 9, 2014


  WND "70 Million Americans Taking Mind-altering Drugs" by David Kupelian.

WND comments on current drug use in America, examining how prescription drugs, alcohol, and other substances influence public health. While examining the future of medicine, the article highlights MAPS’ research into the medical potential of psychedelics and marijuana as treatments for a variety of conditions.



February 7, 2014


  Medical Daily "Open Science Or Protective Laws? Ending Restrictions On Psychoactive Drug Research" by Susan Scutti.

Medical Daily responds to Scientific American’s recent article about obstacles surrounding psychedelic research. The article explores the history of research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics, noting that LSD and MDMA were originally used in medicine before being placed in Schedule I.  Susan Scutti of Medical Daily writes about why the research should continue, wondering whether “[p]erhaps the world would be a better place.”


  Forbes "More Than Zero: Reclassifying Marijuana Could Have A Significant Impact On Drug Policy" by Jacob Sullum.

Forbes investigates the laws and politics surrounding marijuana, noting how medical marijuana research is being blocked by federal agencies. The article highlights President Obama’s recent comments about the safety of marijuana, and MAPS Founder Rick Doblin explains that receiving further research approval is necessary for marijuana to become reclassified. “Assuming that marijuana has been approved as a prescription medicine by the FDA,” Doblin says, “Schedule II seems too high, since Marinol is in Schedule III. Due to its actual abuse potential, marijuana for medical use should be in Schedule V.”


  Psychedelic Press UK "Interview with Manifesting Minds editor Brad Burge of MAPS"

Psychedelic Press UK interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about Manifesting Minds, the newly released anthology of articles from the MAPS Bulletin. Burge speaks about the wide variety of topics about psychedelics found in special editions of the MAPS Bulletin and offers insight into the future of research into the medical potential of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. “Though our primary focus is scientific research,” he explains, “Educating the public is also an essential part of our mission and the MAPS Bulletin has been a way to do that.”



February 5, 2014


  Reality Sandwich "Consideration of Ayahuasca for the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder" by Jessica Nielson and Julie Megler.

Reality Sandwich features an excerpt about ayahuasca research from Manifesting Minds, the newly released MAPS Bulletin anthology. The article gives an extensive overview of research into ayahuasca-assisted therapy as a potential treatment for PTSD and points to studies investigating the use of ayahuasca as a treatment for drug addiction.


  The Daily Beast "Longtime Sufferers of Cluster Headaches Find Relief in Psychedelics" by Valerie Vande Panne.

The Daily Beast reports on new research into psilocybin and LSD as treatments for cluster headaches, featuring interviews with researchers Dr. John Halpern and Bob Wold of ClusterBusters. Halpern speaks about 2-Bromo-LSD, a non-psychoactive version of LSD, which could also help relieve cluster headaches. To illustrate the need for more effective treatment options, the article cites statistics published by Bob Wold in the MAPS Bulletin, noting that the suicide rate is 20 times higher than average for people suffering from cluster headaches.


  Good Times Weekly "Tales of the Vine" by Damon Orion.

Good Times Weekly shares how journalist Rak Razam first experienced ayahuasca in Peru while creating a report about shamanism, which led him to write a book and direct a documentary, both of which are titled Aya: Awakenings. The article highlights the upcoming MAPS-sponsored film screening and Q&A featuring Rak Razam and members of the MAPS Staff on February 8 in Santa Cruz, CA.



February 4, 2014


  Psychology Today "Psychedelics 2.0 and the Shadow of the Sixties" by Anca Ulea.

Psychology Today explores how research into the effects of psychedelics has changed between the 1960s and today, highlighting how scientists have become more rigorous with their studies. “The field itself has kind of moved from an excited adolescence to a calmer young adulthood,” explains Brad Burge of MAPS. “We have new methodologies that are really helping out, we control our clinical studies carefully with double blinds and really make sure to be as scientific as possible without that kind of explosive enthusiasm that earlier researchers had.”


  Psychedelic Press UK "Review: Manifesting Minds by Rick Doblin and Brad Burge (Eds.)"

Psychedelic Press UK reviews Manifesting Minds, the MAPS Bulletin anthology that features over thirty contributions from experts about the role of psychedelics in science, medicine, culture, and spirituality. The article highlights the history and purpose of the MAPS Bulletin, shares excerpts from various portions of the book, and explains why psychedelic research is important for the advancement of scientific knowledge.


  Pacific Standard "Philip Seymour Hoffman and a Simple Solution for America’s Heroin Addiction" by Ted Scheinman.

Pacific Standard looks at the overdose-related death of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, and points to research into the therapeutic use of ibogaine as a possible way to help people suffering from severe drug addiction. The article shares information about MAPS-sponsored ibogaine research taking place in New Zealand and Mexico and interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. “It has unique potential for helping people go through opiate withdrawal,” Doblin says.



January 30, 2014


  Medill Reports "First Medical Pot, Next Ecstasy Therapy?" by Elizabeth Wang.

Medill Reports of Northwestern University joins the conversation about MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD, highlighting the need for a more effective treatment for the 5.2 million Americans affected by PTSD each year. MAPS Clinical Investigator Dr. Michael Mithoefer is interviewed about the public response to research, the ineffectiveness of current PTSD treatments, and the fading stigma surrounding psychedelics. Mithoefer explains the importance of continuing research into the potential medical benefits of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, stating, “We don’t want to deprive patients of potentially life-saving treatment.”



January 28, 2014


  Motherboard "This Is Your Brain on Bitcoin" by Steven Melendez.

Motherboard highlights how and why MAPS began accepting bitcoin (BTC) donations in response to growing demand, how MAPS raised over $21,000 in bitcoins in less than two months, and why the bitcoin community is embracing charitable donations for scientific research on psychedelics and marijuana. Brian Brown explains, “As the Internet gave psychedelics a voice, bitcoins gave the Internet a wallet.”


  Psychotherapy Networker "Ecstasy in the Consulting Room" by Kathleen Smith.

Psychotherapy Networker shares progress from research into treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. The article covers the history of recent studies, details the therapeutic process, and reports on how therapist teams are being trained to conduct research in international locations including Israel, Canada, and Colorado. “One traumatized woman described herself as feeling lost in the underbrush,” recounts Clinical investigator Dr. Michael Mithoefer. “‘I didn’t know where I needed to go,’ she admitted. After some MDMA sessions, she said, ‘Now I have a map.’”



January 27, 2014


  Good Men Project "What Your Doctor Never Taught You About PTSD" by Jed Diamond, Ph.D..

Jed Diamond, Ph.D., writes for the Good Men Project about promising new treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), including Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) and MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. Diamond also recommends Manifesting Minds, the new MAPS Bulletin anthology.


  Examiner.com "Brad Burge on ‘Manifesting Minds’" by Jeffery Pritchett.

Jeffery Pritchett interviews Brad Burge of MAPS for Examiner.com about the wide range of content on the role of psychedelics in science, medicine, and culture in Manifesting Minds, the new anthology of articles from the tri-annual MAPS Bulletin. The article highlights the variety of contributors to Manifesting Minds, how psychedelics have helped as medical treatments for many people, and how psychedelics can creatively inspire the creation of technological inventions and creative insights.



January 23, 2014


  The Chicago Tribune "Obama Retreats from the Drug War" by Steve Chapman.

Steve Chapman of The Chicago Tribune‘s editorial board publishes an op-ed calling on President Obama to end the obstructive Public Health Service review process for medical marijuana research, especially considering Obama’s recent critical statements about the war on drugs.


  The Libertarian "Ibogaine Still Illegal in US, Despite Medical Potential" by Brendan Ferreri-Hanberry .

The Libertarian writes about the medical potential of ibogaine. The article covers its history, religious use, legality, and risks, and highlights MAPS’ ongoing research in New Zealand and Mexico into ibogaine’s potential in addiction treatment. Dr. Anwar Jeewa talks about the importance of a controlled setting for ibogaine experiences, explaining that ibogaine “has to be taken in the right setting and treatment has to be followed up with psychosocial care.”


  Mint Press News "Psychedelics Help Keep People From Returning To Prison: Study" by Katie Rucke.

Mint Press News shares the results of a new academic study analyzing the connection between psychedelic drug use and reduced criminal behavior. According to the researchers, the results suggest that psychedelics “may promote alcohol and other drug abstinence and prosocial behavior in a population with high rates of recidivism.”  Brad Burge of MAPS also gives commentary on the political history of drugs. “The legal status of drugs has historically had no relationship to scientific evidence about their risks,” he points out. “MAPS and other organizations in the psychedelic science field are changing that.”



January 22, 2014


  Scientific American "End the Ban on Psychoactive Drug Research"

Scientific American makes the case for additional public support for research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics and marijuana to treat severe mental illnesses and other medical conditions. The article explores the history of research into the potential medical benefits of LSD, MDMA, psilocybin, and marijuana, highlighting how these substances hold promise for treating people suffering PTSD, cluster headaches, obsessive compulsive disorder, and other conditions.



January 19, 2014


  Oped News "Mindful Molecules" by Craig K. Comstock.

Oped News reviews Manifesting Minds, the new MAPS Bulletin anthology featuring experts discussing the role of psychedelics in science, medicine, spirituality, and other areas. The review notes how psychedelic science is exploring the use of MDMA and other psychedelics for serious medical conditions including PTSD, to facilitate mystical and spiritual experiences, and improve the lives of healthy individuals.



January 17, 2014


  Time 4 Hemp "Veteran Sean Azzariti Talks about Marijuana for Treating PTSD on Time 4 Hemp" by Casper Leitch.

Time 4 Hemp interviews combat veteran Sean Azzariti, the first person to legally purchase recreational marijuana in Colorado. Azzariti describes how marijuana is a “life changer” for managing PTSD symptoms, and why it’s important to create conversations about the widespread issue of PTSD in veterans and others. Azzariti mentions the importance of MAPS’ work, stating, “It’s amazing to see the progress that we’re making with posttraumatic stress disorder outside of the normal pharmaceutical realm that we’re used to getting shoved down our throats.”


  International Business Times "Ecstasy a Potential Treatment for Anxiety and PTSD, Scientists Claim" by Hannah Osborne.

International Business Times reports on the completion of a new study by researchers at Imperial College London on the effect of MDMA in the brains of 25 healthy human volunteers. The results from the study, which was featured on UK Channel 4’s “Drugs Live” show last year, show that MDMA reduces blood flow in areas of the brain associated with processing emotions and memories. “The findings suggest possible clinical uses of MDMA in treating anxiety and PTSD,” says researcher Professor David Nutt. “But we need to be careful about drawing too many conclusions from a study in healthy volunteers. We would have to do studies in patients to see if we find the same effects.”


  Medline Plus "Could Ecstasy Help People With Anxiety, PTSD?" by Robert Preidt.

Medline Plus highlights a new study from Imperial College London on the effects of MDMA on the human brain. The study used fMRI brain scans to monitor how MDMA affected the brains of 25 healthy human volunteers as they processed positive and negative memories. The results show how MDMA changes the way the brain processes emotions, and add to the evidence for MDMA’s promise as a treatment for anxiety and PTSD.


  Imperial College London "Study Reveals How Ecstasy Acts on the Brain and Hints at Therapeutic Uses" by Sam Wong.

Imperial College London announces the results of their completed study of how MDMA works in the human brain. The study was led by Professors David Nutt and Val Curran, and portions of the study were previously televised on UK Channel 4’s “Drugs Live” program. The results show that volunteers were able to more easily process negative memories and had reduced blood flow in areas of the brain associated with memory and emotion. “In healthy volunteers, MDMA seems to lessen the impact of painful memories,” reports researcher Robin Carhart-Harris, PhD. “This fits with the idea that it could help patients with PTSD revisit their traumatic experiences in psychotherapy without being overwhelmed by negative emotions.”



January 15, 2014


  Motherboard "In a World of Opiate Addicts, the Internet Plays Doctor and Therapist" by Steven Melendez.

Motherboard highlights how sites including Bluelight and Opiophile support online harm reduction. Bluelight co-owner Sebastian’s Ghost talks about the history of Bluelight.org and how scientists use online information to gather information about drugs and drug use. Brad Burge of MAPS also speaks about the MAPS Forums on Bluelight and how services like Bluelight help create open dialogues about drugs.



January 13, 2014


  Psychedelic Frontier "MAPS Completes First New Therapeutic LSD Study in 40 Years"

Psychedelic Frontier announces that MAPS has completed the first new therapeutic study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy in over 40 years. The study focused on treating people with end-of-life anxiety and the results have been accepted for publication the peer-reviewed Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. The article shares quotes about the success of the research from study coordinator Dr. Peter Gasser and MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. In a public letter about the study, Gasser states, “We can show that LSD treatment can be safe when it is done in a carefully controlled clinical setting.”



January 7, 2014


  Santa Cruz Weekly "Santa Cruz Group Scrutinizes Powerful Psychedelic" by Maria Grusauskas.

Santa Cruz Weekly reports on current research into ibogaine-assisted therapy to treat opiate addiction. Ibogaine researcher Thomas Brown, Ph.D., and Brad Burge of MAPS are interviewed, sharing observations from the studies, information about how ibogaine works, and other addictions that may benefit from this research. Brown speaks about the success of this research, stating, “The ibogaine treatment gave people the sense that they could overcome the addiction.”


  Entheo Radio "Manifesting Minds: Psychedelic Therapy and Medical Cannabis" by Hugh T Alkemi.

Entheo Radio interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about the release of Manifesting Minds: A Review of Psychedelics in Science, Medicine, Sex, and Spirituality, the success of MAPS’ Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign to complete MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research, the current status surrounding clinical research proposals into the medical benefits of marijuana, and utilizing the internet to reach new supporters of psychedelic research.



January 3, 2014


  Leaf Science "Why Colorado’s First Legal Marijuana Buyer Was A War Veteran With PTSD"

Leaf Science announces that the first person to legally purchase recreational marijuana in Colorado was Sean Azzariti, a war veteran suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Azzariti explains how marijuana helps him manage the symptoms of PTSD, stating, “Cannabis saved me when PTSD was just overwhelming me.”


contract 2013 Media Articles...


December 30, 2013


  Medscape "Tuning In to Psychedelics’ Therapeutic Potential" by Nancy A. Melville.

Medscape explores the resurgence of research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics including LSD, psilocybin, and MDMA. Through a series of interviews, prominent researchers explain how these substances may help people suffering from psychiatric disorders including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and depression.



December 23, 2013


  Arizona Capitol Times "Study of Marijuana Use for Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Remains Frozen" by Dr. Sue Sisley.

Dr. Sue Sisley sets the record straight about an AZ Central editorial repeating a misleading statement about the National Institute on Drug Abuse refusal to support medical marijuana research aiming to develop the whole marijuana plant into a prescription medicine. Dr. Sisley explains that NIDA has consistently prevented research, pointing to three separate FDA-approved studies to which NIDA has refused to sell marijuana.



December 17, 2013


  AlterNet "Why the Miraculous Healing Properties of Weed Are Driving a Decorated Veteran on a Mission" by April M. Short.

AlterNet shares the story of war veteran Perry Parks and his work to help veterans receive access to medical marijuana to help them cope with symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The article details Parks’ mission to provide an effective solution to treating symptoms of PTSD, and explains the science behind the effects of marijuana on people with PTSD. Brad Burge of MAPS also explains the obstacles facing clinical research into the potential medical benefits of marijuana.



December 16, 2013


  Midwest Real "Man Plans God Laughs"

Midwest Real interviews U.S. Army veteran Tim Amoroso about his experience returning home to the U.S. with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Amoroso details what it was like suffering from PTSD and explains his frustration with the current treatment methods offered by the Veterans Administration. He also recounts his experience of self-administering MDMA in a non-clinical setting and passionately expresses how his life has changed in great ways since.



December 13, 2013


  Medscape "Psychedelic Medicine: Worth the Trip?" by Professor David J. Nutt, MD, and Bret S. Stetka, MD.

Medscape hosts a slideshow presentation about the resurgence of research into the potential medical benefits of psychedelic substances. Written by Professor David J. Nutt, MD, and Bret S. Stetka, MD, this educational resource touches upon the history of psychedelics, details about the medical potential of MDMA, LSD, psilocybin, and ibogaine.



December 11, 2013


  Stoney Roads "Could MDMA Become a Legal Drug in the USA?"

Stoney Roads features a portion of the reddit Ask Me Anything session hosted by MAPS, looking at the timeline of research into treating posttraumatic stress disorder with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. In response to a question about making this treatment more widely available, Amy Emerson of MAPS explains, “At least two Phase 3 studies are typically required to prove safety and efficacy before permission for prescription use can be approved.”



December 10, 2013


  Less Than Three "MDMA Could Be Legally Prescribed by 2021" by Nathan Codd.

Less Than Three extracts information about MDMA research from the reddit Ask Me Anything session hosted by MAPS. The article highlights that MDMA-assisted psychotherapy may become a prescription treatment option for people suffering from PTSD in 2021 after more studies are completed.


  Crust Nation "MDMA in Phase 2 of Clinical Research as a Prescription Medication" by Ashley Cizek.

Crust Nation writes about the possibility of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy becoming a prescription treatment for PTSD by the year 2021. The article provides an in-depth overview of how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy affects people suffering from PTSD.



December 9, 2013


  The Commonwealth Club "Treating Trauma: Richard Rockefeller and Larry Brilliant at the Commonwealth Club" by MAPS.

Could MDMA effectively treat—maybe even cure—post-traumatic stress disorder (PSTD)? Dr. Richard Rockefeller says yes—or at least a very strong maybe. He says studies involving a small number of people with moderate to severe treatment-resistant PTSD found most subjects were improved after three treatments with medical-quality ecstasy. He’s cautiously optimistic about the prospect of psychedelic medicine, which he believes could heal the trauma in millions from Darfur to the former Yugoslavia. FDA-approved trials of therapy with ecstasy began in 2004, and Dr. Rockefeller believes the U.S. government will eventually approve using the drug for serious medical treatment if research on larger numbers bears out these early findings. What are the possible downsides to this research and what safeguards should be in place to govern it? Is this too good to be true? Join a conversation about the frontiers of brain science and potential for soothing the human condition.

Richard Rockefeller, M.D., Former Board Member, Rockefeller University; Former Chair, U.S. Advisory Board, Doctors Without Borders

In conversation with Larry Brilliant, M.D., MPH, President, Skoll Global Threats Fund; Co-founder, Seva Foundation

Special thanks to The Commonwealth Club of California.


  Religion Dispatches "Will Doctors Ever Prescribe Psychedelics?"

The University of Southern California’s Religion Dispatches covers the Ask Me Anything session hosted by MAPS Founder Rick Doblin and MAPS staff, focusing on the topic of spirituality. Responding to a question about the spiritual and therapeutic uses of LSD and ayahuasca, Doblin responded, “Spiritual experiences can occur in a hospital setting as well as in a shamanistic ritual.”


  The Dish "Ask Rick Doblin Anything: How To Experience Psychedelics?" by Andrew Sullivan.

The Dish asks MAPS Founder Rick Doblin the second in a series of reader-submitted questions about psychedelics. Doblin speaks about the unconscious mind as the guide for psychedelic experiences and emphasizes the importance of having someone nearby to provide a sense of safety.

Watch Part 1 of this video series here.


  Pulse Radio "MDMA Might Be A Prescription Drug By 2021" by Chandler Shortlidge.

Pulse Radio shares the reddit Ask Me Anything session hosted by MAPS, highlighting the status of research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD and how it could be a legal treatment by 2021.


  Fact Mag "MDMA Could Be Legally Prescribed Following Extensive Trials"

Fact Mag calls the recent reddit Ask Me Anything session hosted by MAPS “some of the most sober drug talk we’ve seen all year.” The brief article highlights researchers’ projections that MDMA-assisted psychotherapy could become a prescription treatment option for people diagnosed with PTSD by 2021.


  YourEDM "MDMA Could Be Legalized By 2021" by Ryan Railsback.

YourEDM explores MDMA-assisted psychotherapy becoming a prescription treatment for people suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder. The article details the timeline for current and future research into this treatment that must happen in order to make the therapy legally available.


  Mixmag "MDMA Could Become a Prescription Drug by 2021"

Mixmag highlights the Ask Me Anything session hosted on reddit by MAPS Founder Rick Doblin and the staff of MAPS. The topics of the article include the safety of marijuana, the myth of LSD “flashbacks,” and how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research is helping people with PTSD.



December 8, 2013


  AZ Central "Lack of Pot for Research No Myth" by Dr. Sue Sisley.

Dr. Sue Sisley responds to an earlier AZ Central editorial echoing a misleading statement about the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s stance on medical marijuana research. Dr. Sisley points out NIDA’s refusal to provide research-approved marijuana to three separate FDA-approved studies, clarifying that NIDA continues to block research intended to develop the whole marijuana plant into a medicine.



December 6, 2013


  The Dish "Ask Rick Doblin Anything: The Myths Of Psychedelics" by Andrew Sullivan.

The Dish asks MAPS Founder Rick Doblin a reader-submitted question about the biggest myth surrounding psychedelic drugs. Clarifying a misconception about the validity of psychedelic experiences, he explains: “They are human experiences that we access through psychedelics, rather than psychedelic experiences that are somehow a foreign implant that are not actually real.”

Watch Part 2 of this video series here.



December 4, 2013


  AlterNet "10 Best Answers to Questions About Using Psychedelics" by April M. Short.

AlterNet highlights 10 of the best questions and answers from the AMA (Ask Me Anything) hosted by MAPS Founder Rick Doblin and MAPS staff on reddit. MAPS staff answered more than 75 out of over 2,000 questions asked by the reddit community. “This is one of the most exciting and inspiring parts of what we do,” says Brad Burge of MAPS. “Interacting with people who are actively trying to broaden their perspective about the risks and therapeutic benefits of psychedelics and marijuana.“


  Psychedelic Frontier "“Ask Me Anything” Reddit interview with Rick Doblin & MAPS"

Psychedelic Frontier collates the questions and answers from the AMA (Ask Me Anything) session hosted by MAPS Founder Rick Doblin and the staff of MAPS. The collection of answers touch upon research into the scientific and medical potential for psychedelics and marijuana; how these substances can produce therapeutic, spiritual, and enlightening experiences; and the future of psychedelics and marijuana.


  Being Bipolar Podcast "Being Bipolar: Ep. 154 – Psychedelics and Mental Health" by Bret Bernhoft.

The Being Bipolar Podcast interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about psychedelics and their role as tools for treating mental health issues. The discussion also addresses how MAPS is using the internet to maximize educational outreach and how psychedelics and marijuana are being seen more and more as healing tools.



December 3, 2013


  reddit "MAPS Hosts “Ask Me Anything” Interview on reddit" by MAPS.

On December 3, 2013, MAPS Founder Rick Doblin and the staff of MAPS participated in an AMA (Ask Me Anything) session hosted on reddit. The public interview remained on the home page of reddit throughout the entire day, generating over 2,000 questions and more than 75 answers about the scientific and medical potential of psychedelics and marijuana.



November 30, 2013


  Healthline "4 Illegal Drugs That Might Be Medicines" by Rachel Barclay.

Healthline explores the medical potential of several currently illegal drugs, including psilocybin, ketamine, and MDMA. Psychiatrist Michael Mithoefer, M.D., talks about MDMA as an adjunct to psychotherapy. He explains, “MDMA seems to give people a period of time in which they connect with their emotions but are not overwhelmed by them, a sense that ‘this is difficult, but I can do it.’”



November 22, 2013


  Reality Sandwich "Another Green World: Psychedelics and Ecology" by Daniel Pinchbeck.

Reality Sandwich publishes an excerpt from Manifesting Minds, the upcoming anthology of articles from the MAPS Bulletin, in which Daniel Pinchbeck reflects on the relationship between psychedelics and ecology. “In the same way that we garden plants, teacher plants like ayahuasca seem to garden us when we ingest them. During shamanic sessions, people often get direct messages about how to transform their lives.”



November 21, 2013


  WNPR "The Agony and Utility of Ecstasy" by Chion Wolf.

WNPR interviews Brad Burge of MAPS along with University of Connecticut Professor C. Michael White, Dr. John Halpern of Harvard, Sam Tracy of Students for Sensible Drug Policy, and EDM producer Tommie Sunshine in a special segment focusing on the risks, benefits, popular uses, and public health implications of MDMA.



November 20, 2013


  City Pages "How Ayahuasca Can Revolutionize Psychotherapy" by Olivia LaVecchia.

City Pages explores the world of the psychedelic brew ayahuasca, addressing its use for healing people in ceremonial contexts and in scientific research. The article highlights the potential of ayahuasca as a treatment for addiction, depression, and end-of-life anxiety, and shares interviews with Dennis McKenna, Gabor Mate, Brian Rush, and MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. Speaking about the need for more research into the potential medical benefits of ayahuasca, Brian Rush states, “This is a potential approach that a lot of people have some confidence in, and at least enough confidence to say, ‘We need more studies. We need to know more.’”



November 14, 2013


  Entheo Radio "Manifesting Minds with Brad Burge"

Entheo Radio interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about the excitement surrounding the launch of MAPS’ Indiegogo fundraising campaign to fund MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for veterans with PTSD, the expansion of global interest in ayahuasca, how media portrayal of psychedelics can improve, and the upcoming January 7 release of Manifesting Minds, an all-new anthology of articles from the MAPS Bulletin.



November 11, 2013


  Huffington Post Live "Marijuana Is Helping Our Vets Cope With War" by Josh Zepps.

Huffington Post Live interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin, Amy Rising, Ricardo Andre Pereyda, and Dr. Raphael Mechoulam about marijuana for treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans. Doblin details the current status of research initiatives focused on turning marijuana into a medicine, speaks about the increase in public support for medical marijuana, and explains the differences in treating PTSD symptoms with medical marijuana compared to MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, which aims at more lasting changes.



November 8, 2013


  SBS "Treating Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder with Ecstasy"

SBS interviews Rachel Hope about how her life changed after participating in MAPS’ clinical trial of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD. Martin Williams, founder of Psychedelic Research in Science & Medicine (PRISM), talks about his hopes to bring similar research to Australia, stating, “We are only interested in working with pure MDMA, the effects of which in participants are well categorised and the safety profile is well established.” Rachel Hope describes the impact and effectiveness of this treatment, saying, “My life is incredible,” she says. “I was grateful to just get a little relief but I’m cured of PTSD.”



November 5, 2013


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE:  Smoke Signals and Acid Dreams: An Evening with Martin Lee and MAPS in Santa Cruz"

Santa Cruz, Calif.—The Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), a non-profit research and educational organization based in Santa Cruz, Calif., is hosting a free event at the Pacific Cultural Center on Friday, November 22nd at 7:00 PM. Smoke Signals and Acid Dreams: An Evening with Martin Lee, is an evening lecture and open discussion focusing on the latest research on the potential benefits, as well as the risks, of medical marijuana and psychedelic psychotherapy.

Download the press release.



November 1, 2013


  Reason "Psychedelic Science: Magic Mushrooms" by Alex Manning & Paul Feine.

Reason sheds light on the resurgence of scientific research into psilocybin mushrooms by interviewing psychedelic researchers Robin Carhart-Harris of Imperial College London and Roland Griffiths of Johns Hopkins University at Psychedelic Science 2013. They speak about the effects of psilocybin on the brain, their research results, and what the implications of this research may be.



October 26, 2013


  International Drug Policy Reform Conference "The Future of Psychedelic Research: What’s Next?" by MAPS.

We are now in the midst of a psychedelic research renaissance, with clinical studies under way at top medical schools and research institutes worldwide. How might psychedelics redefine medicine and science, and how can we effectively reintegrate them into contemporary society? What new directions will the future hold? And what are some post-prohibition models for regulation that are already being envisioned and implemented?

Featuring Gabby Agin-Liebes, Jag Davies, Rick Doblin, Albert Garcia, Ingmar Gorman, Joshua Wickerham



October 25, 2013


  International Drug Policy Reform Conference "Is the Drug War Blocking the Best PTSD Treatments?" by MAPS.

This interdisciplinary panel and discussion will focus on how psychedelic-assisted therapy, medical marijuana, and occupational therapy are helping some veterans for whom conventional treatments are not working. What does a federally approved clinical marijuana study look like for PTSD? What does an MDMA-assisted therapy study protocol look like? How does marijuana help de-escalate PTSD triggers? And what is going on in Congress to address this issue at the federal level?

Featuring Shawn Majors, Alexander Neumeister, Marcela Ot’alora, Bill Piper, Steph Sherer, and Sue Sisley


  International Drug Policy Reform Conference "What Can Psychedelics Teach Us About Drug Misuse and Addiction?" by MAPS.

Ayahuasca, ibogaine and psilocybin are helping people face death, cope with trauma, and overcome addiction to alcohol, tobacco, opiates and other drugs. What can we learn from the growing body of scientific research? Can these drugs revolutionize addiction treatment? And how can we enhance the benefits and reduce the harms of psychedelic drug use outside of treatment settings?

Featuring Albert Garcia, John Harrison, Stefanie Jones, Philippe Lucas, Linnae Ponté, and Andrew Tatarsky


  International Drug Policy Reform Conference "Communications Strategies:  Psychedelics as the “New Pot”?" by MAPS.

Public discourse around both marijuana and psychedelic drugs has shifted rapidly over the last decade, especially the past few years. Is that where the similarities end? In what ways have marijuana and psychedelics each been re-branded? To what extent can we draw lessons from recent marijuana reform victories when it comes to other drugs? And what are the opportunities and pitfalls for changing hearts and minds about marijuana and psychedelic policies moving forward?

Featuring Tom Angell, Brad Burge, Jag Davies, Aaron Houston, Jason Salzman, and Anna Szostek



October 24, 2013


  International Drug Policy Reform Conference "Research Impurities: What Do Politics Have to Do With Drug Research?" by MAPS.

Drug research is highly politicized. The National Institute on Drug Abuse, which funds 85% of addiction research worldwide, has been accused of using its influence to advance its political agenda. How do politics influence what and who gets studied, the measures used to evaluate drug effects, and the conclusions that are drawn? What are the fundamental biases inherent in the current research environment? How do political, financial and institutional constraints create gaps in our knowledge and shape core myths that have become taken-for-granted “truths” about drugs and people who use drugs? And what can researchers do to overcome some of these problems?

Featuring Shaquita Borden, Rick Doblin, Robert Grantfield, Carl Hart, Sheigla Murphy, Lynn Paltrow, and Sue Sisley



October 23, 2013


  OracleTalk "Voices of Tomorrow: Giancarlo Canavesio On His Transformational New Film ‘Neurons to Nirvana’" by Erik Bucci.

OracleTalk interviews Giancarlo Canavesio about Neurons to Nirvana, his newest documentary about how scientists are studying the medical benefits of various psychedelics and getting exciting results. While speaking about charitable and personal activities, Canavesio talks about why he supports MAPS and reflects on the vision of MAPS Founder Rick Doblin.



October 21, 2013


  UPI "New Study Will See if MDMA Can Help Autistic Adults with Social Anxiety" by Evan Bleier.

UPI shares a major update about research into MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in autistic adults, announcing that the Research Advisory Panel of California and the Institutional Review Board at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center/Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute has approved the new MAPS-sponsored study. The study will be led by Charles Grob, M.D., and Alicia Danforth, Ph.D.


  The Raw Story "California Science Review Panel Approves Study on MDMA Treatment for Autistic Adults" by Eric W. Dolan.

The Raw Story announces MAPS’ new study into MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in autistic adults that recently received approval from the Research Advisory Panel of California and the Institutional Review Board at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center/Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute. Researchers will study the therapeutic effects of MDMA-assisted therapy in 12 autistic adults, once the study has final approval from the Drug Enforcement Administration.


  Opposing Views "Major Committees Approve Study To Give Ecstasy To Autistic Adults With Social Anxiety" by Sarah Rae Fruchtnicht.

Opposing Views covers the Research Advisory Panel of California and the Institutional Review Board at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center/Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute’s approval of MAPS’ new research into MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum. The study received approval from the Food and Drug Administration in April and is awaiting approval from the Drug Enforcement Agency in addition to further funding.


  Shalom Life "Should MDMA be Legalized for Medicinal Purposes?" by Gideon Greenbaum-Shinder.

Shalom Life interviews MAPS Clinical Research Associate Mimi Peleg about her role in helping scientific research into the medical benefits of MDMA and marijuana take place in Israel. Peleg speaks about the high rate of PTSD among Israelis, the effectiveness of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD, and the future of medical marijuana.



October 20, 2013


  The Los Angeles Times "In New York, Late Nights Are Fueled by Party Drug Molly" by Alana Semuels.

The Los Angeles Times explores the rise in popularity of the drug known as Molly in New York and other areas, interviewing recreational users about their experiences with the drug. The article explains that Molly is often mixed with other substances and is usually not pure MDMA. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin reflects on the Molly trend in popular music culture. “In this digital age, people want human emotion, they want to celebrate communally,” Doblin said. “People are hungry for this type of experience.”


  Playboy "Molly is the New Club Drug, But What’s In It?" by Frank Owen & Lera Gavin.

Playboy includes commentary from MAPS Founder Rick Doblin in an article about the history of MDMA, from therapeutic tool to dance floor drug and back again.



October 18, 2013


  Huffington Post Live "Let’s Get Synthetic" by Ricky Camilleri.

Huffington Post Live host Ricky Camilleri interviews MAPS Founder and Executive Director Rick Doblin and VICE Science Editor Hamilton Morris about the current state of research chemicals, how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can help people suffering from PTSD, and how factual information about drugs is one of the best ways to promote harm reduction.



October 17, 2013


  Katie "What You Need to Know About Molly" by Katie Couric.

Katie Couric invites MDMA expert Dr. Julie Holland and former FBI agent Brad Garrett to clarify information about the emerging drug Molly, focusing on how it is not a pure version of MDMA while explaining the risks associated with taking an unknown substance from the streets. Holland explains the therapeutic value of MDMA, noting, “In its pure form, with a doctor supervising, you can give it to somebody. There’s a study with posttraumatic stress disorder where they’re giving MDMA to veterans.” Holland adds, “In that setting, it’s fairly safe, and there may even be some benefit.”



October 11, 2013


  The Subjective Perspective Show "The Subjective Perspective Show Interviews Brad Burge of MAPS"

The Subjective Perspective Show interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about the legitimization of psychedelic research, why he supports medical marijuana, and how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can help people overcome treatment-resistant posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).



October 10, 2013


  CMC Forum "James Fadiman: Psychedelic Research and Applications" by Manav Kohli.

CMC Forum interviews psychedelic researcher James Fadiman, Ph.D., about exciting results from his career studying psychedelics. They investigate the promising results from research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD, and the creative insights that psychedelic research could provide for scientists and doctors to advance their fields of study.



October 8, 2013


  Tablet Magazine "Can Ecstasy, Primarily Known as a Club Drug, Help People Suffering From Trauma?" by Jennifer Bleyer.

Tablet Magazine checks in on psychedelic research in Israel, sharing an inspiring testimonial from a 70-year-old Israeli named Josef, who suffered from PTSD for decades until participating in our ongoing Israeli study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. The article also profiles MAPS Founder Rick Doblin, detailing his career aspirations, his family life, creating MAPS, and why Israel was selected as a location for MDMA research.



October 7, 2013


  The Raw Story "‘Transforming Medicine’ Mini Documentary Profiles Psychedelic Research Conference" by Eric W. Dolan.

The Raw Story showcases Transforming Medicine, the new mini-documentary about psychedelic science. The article quotes Gabor Mate, MD, who shares his stance on how to efficiently engage others in discussions about the medical benefits of psychedelics, and reminds viewers to discover over 80 videos of educational content presented at Psychedelic Science 2013, now available at psychedelicscience.org.



October 2, 2013


  Jewish Journal "Light-Up Nation: What Israel Can Teach America About Medical Marijuana" by SImone Wilson.

Jewish Journal investigates the history of medical marijuana in Israel. The article highlights Israel’s large legal medical marijuana farm, how the drug has helped Israeli Defense Forces veterans treat their PTSD, and how medical marijuana fits into Israel’s health care system. Dr. Alan Shackelford summarizes the importance of this research, noting, “We have an obligation as a medical community to study cannabis so that we can understand how it works, and more effectively decide what cannabinoids are most effective for what, and at what dose.”


  The Psychiatric Times "From the Streets to the Rx Pad: Do Party Drugs Have a Place in the Medical Office?" by Heidi Anne Duerr, MPH.

The Psychiatric Times speaks with Andrew Penn, Associate Clinical Professor at the University of California, San Francisco about his presentation at the US Psychiatric and Mental Health Congress regarding the therapeutic potential of MDMA, marijuana, and ketamine. Penn highlights the promising results of MAPS’ first completed study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD, details the variety of conditions that can be treated by medical marijuana, and urges clinicians to provide harm reduction advice to patients to promote safe drug use.



October 1, 2013


  Wired "Timothy Leary’s Transformation From Scientist to Psychedelic Celebrity" by Greg Miller.

Wired gives an overview of psychedelic researcher Timothy Leary’s archive of written papers, research, and experiences. The article points to the prominent of researchers and doctors that presented completed study results at Psychedelic Science 2013, and interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin about his studies of Leary’s early work and legacy. “Doblin says it’s not fair to blame the decades-long lull in psychedelic research entirely on Leary,” writes Greg Miller of Wired. “‘He deserves some condemnation, but he also made a fundamental contribution to the scientific study of psychedelics,’ Doblin said.”



September 30, 2013


  Midwest Real "Brad Burge of MAPS on Midwest Real"

Midwest Real engages Brad Burge of MAPS in a discussion about the path to legitimizing psychedelics, how the media sensationalizes negative stories about drugs, and about how psychedelic harm reduction and clinical research are changing public perceptions around psychedelics.



September 26, 2013


  Tikkun "PTSD Relief in Israel Through MDMA and Cannabis Research" by Mimi Peleg.

Researcher and advocate Mimi Peleg reports for Tikkun on psychedelic and medical marijuana research in Israel, sharing successes she’s witnessed, personal anecdotes about her work studying new treatments for PTSD using marijuana and MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, and how this research can shape the future. Peleg notes the prevalence of PTSD in Israeli citizens, highlights the progress and process of MAPS’ study into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in Israel, and looks forward to a new study of treating PTSD with medical marijuana. Peleg emphasizes, “Cannabis and MDMA education and research in Israel suffers from a severe lack of funds and this is where any one of us anywhere can be of tremendous help.”



September 20, 2013


  The Atlantic "Electronic Dance Music’s Love Affair With Ecstasy: A History" by P. Nash Jenkins.

The Atlantic inspects the relationship between electronic dance music (EDM) concerts and the recreational use of MDMA, diving into the origins, culture, and rise in popularity of EDM culture. MAPS Founder and Executive Director Rick Doblin shares insights about the spiritual aspect of MDMA use, the impurity of street drugs claiming to be MDMA, and his thoughts about why the electronic music scene embraces MDMA.



September 19, 2013


  The Arizona Daily Wildcat "Medical Marijuana Research Sees Opposition" by Meggie Kessler.

The Arizona Daily Wildcat takes a glimpse at the harsh political landscape for medical marijuana research in Arizona. MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley speaks about the government obstacles surrounding our FDA-approved study of medical marijuana for 50 combat veterans suffering from PTSD.  Dr. Sisley explains, “[Federal regulators] decided that, in their heads, marijuana has no medical benefit. That’s why they put it as a Schedule I drug. People in law enforcement – the DEA – for some reason they’re allowed to make a decision about the medical properties of this plant. The DEA should have no business defining what class drugs are placed in.”



September 12, 2013


  AlterNet "Medical Marijuana Industry Sprouts Up in Israel" by April M. Short.

AlterNet dives deeply into Israel’s successful medical marijuana program, which effectively provides Israeli citizens with effective medicines while allowing scientists to conduct research into the medical benefits of the drug. MAPS Clinical Research Associate Mimi Peleg speaks with Alternet about the history of medical marijuana in Israel, how she prepares patients for treatment, and how Israel’s stance on medical marijuana is an example of how countries like the United States can move forward with medical marijuana.



September 9, 2013


  News21 "Veterans Try Alternative Treatments from Yoga to Marijuana" by Bonnie Campo and Jake Stein.

News21 takes an intimate look at the lives of veterans suffering from PTSD who are finding that alternative treatment methods including yoga and medical marijuana are more helpful for them than standard medications. In the report, MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley talks about about the growing need and continued resistance to medical marijuana research for veterans. Sisley notes, “Anytime you dare to ask the government to allow you to do a study on the efficacy of marijuana, it’s going to get blocked. Science should never be shackled by politics.”



September 6, 2013


  ABC News "A Music Festival Where Drugs Aren’t the Enemy" by Ted Hesson.

ABC News explores how the decriminalization of drugs in Portugal allows events like Boom Festival to provide services like KosmiCare, a dedicated space for harm reduction. By working closely with medical staff and police, KosmiCare helps festival attendees feel more comfortable in a potentially overwhelming environment. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin explains, “It creates a whole climate of comfort at an event.” He continues, “I think that there’s a general sense the U.S. has been on a punitive, counterproductive approach, and people around the world are exploring different options.”



September 5, 2013


  Washington Times "‘Molly’ is Not Your Friend. It is a Potentially Deadly Drug" by Paul Mountjoy.

The Washington Times explores the clinical potential of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD while reporting on the safety of a tainted version of MDMA known as “Molly.” The article details how the government’s classification of MDMA is preventing additional research into its potential positive and negative effects.



September 4, 2013


  Mint Press News "Are Psychedelic Drugs The New Marijuana?" by Katie Rucke.

Mint Press News sheds light on the resurgence of psychedelic research, educating their readers about the role of psychedelics in neuroscience, medicine, and psychology. The article details research into MDMA-assisted therapy as a treatment for social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum and lists a number of research papers signifying additional medical benefits stemming from psychedelic research.


  2ser "Treating Post Traumatic Stress with…Ecstacy?"

Australian radio program 2ser discusses the possibility that Australia could be the next country to welcome research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD. The show’s hosts explore the chances of bringing MDMA research to Australia, especially as a way to help heal many veterans suffering from treatment-resistant PTSD.



September 3, 2013


  TIME.com "Concert Deaths: Four Myths About the Drug Molly" by Maia Szalavitz.

TIME.com dispels some common myths about “Molly” in the wake of several recent deaths from the tainted drug. The article highlights that MDMA is being researched for its potential to be used as a therapeutic-adjunct for treating PTSD and distinguishes between the scientific and recreational uses of MDMA. Author Maia Szalavitz explains, “Short-term, highly monitored use in treatment can’t compare to taking an illegal drug of uncertain purity in a chaotic environment among strangers.”



September 1, 2013


  CNN "Electric Zoo Music Festival Canceled After 2 Deaths Blamed on Drugs" by Morgan Winsor.

CNN presents the concept of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD in an effort to distinguish the difference between the safety of clinical research that uses MDMA compared to recreational use of “Molly,” a tainted version of MDMA.



August 30, 2013


  Australian Broadcasting Corporation "Push to Trial Use of Ecstasy in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Treatment" by Conor Duffy.

The Australian Broadcasting Corporation looks into a potential opening for new research in Australia into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. The article features anecdotes from Steve McDonald of Psychedelic Research in Science & Medicine (PRISM), Rick Doblin of MAPS, and Tony Macie, a study participant from MAPS’ U.S. research. Macie is interviewed about his experience receiving MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD, remarking “If anything, immediately after I did it, I wished it would be allowed for a lot of veterans with PTSD. I think it could make beyond a huge impact.”



August 29, 2013


  The Conversation "Shroom to Grow: Australia’s Missing Psychedelic Science" by Stephen Bright & Martin Williams.

The Conversation makes a passionate call for Australia to embrace psychedelic research as a way to help heal citizens suffering from psychological illnesses, noting that current Australian research can only examine the potential harm of psychedelics. The article highlights results from MAPS’ international psychedelic research program as a motivational tool to inspire Australians to study the medical potential of psychedelics.



August 27, 2013


  Good Times Weekly "The Battle Against ‘Bad Trips’" by April M. Short.

Good Times Weekly focuses on the mission of the Zendo Project, MAPS’ psychedelic harm reduction service offering compassionate care for people undergoing difficult psychedelic experiences at festivals around the world. Zendo Project Harm Reduction Coordinator Linnae Ponté speaks about the importance of this work, explaining, “When someone is having a difficult experience [with psychedelics], what they need more than anything is to feel safe and secure so that they can surrender to the experience, and that involves someone who is ready to compassionately listen to them or just hold space for them.”



August 22, 2013


  Healthline "Psychedelic Drugs Linked to Lower Risk of Mental Illness" by Brian Krans.

Healthline explores a new study finding no connection between psychedelic substance use and mental health problems. The article highlights MAPS’ presence in Black Rock City 2013, detailing how the Zendo Project psychedelic harm reduction services help people who feel overwhelmed while undergoing a difficult psychedelic experience.


  New Scientist "Mind-Altering Drug Could Offer Life Free of Heroin"

New Scientist publishes a detailed report of a participant’s experience in MAPS’ study of ibogaine-assisted therapy as a treatment for addiction. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin elaborates on the purpose of ibogaine research, explaining, “There have been claims by the government that there’s a high potential for abuse and no medical use, and claims from ibogaine advocates that one dose is a miracle cure. We’re trying to gather some scientific evidence to better evaluate it.”



August 21, 2013


  The Libertarian "Psilocybin Still Strictly Prohibited, Despite Medical Potential" by Brendan Ferreri-Hanberry.

The Libertarian reports on how scientists are conducting research into the potential medical benefits of psilocybin-assisted therapy as a treatment for end-of-life anxiety, depression, smoking addiction, and OCD.



August 20, 2013


  Popular Science "Psychedelic Drugs Don’t Make People Crazy, Study Says" by Shaunacy Ferro.

Popular Science highlights a new study that measures the link between use of psychedelic substances and mental health issues. Researchers conducting the population study found that a total of 22,000 out of 130,000 randomly selected adults in the United States had experience with psychedelics. The study results indicate that people who use psychedelics are less likely to have serious psychological distress or mental health problems.



August 19, 2013


  ScienceDaily "LSD and Other Psychedelics Not Linked With Mental Health Problems, Analysis Suggests"

ScienceDaily reports on a newly published population study of adults in the United States that indicates use of psychedelics is not linked to the development of mental health issues. Researchers discovered that use of psychedelics correlated with having less psychological distress and fewer psychiatric medicine prescriptions. “Over the past 50 years tens of millions of people have used psychedelics and there just is not much evidence of long-term problems,” explains researcher Teri Krebs.


  Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) "LSD and Other Psychedelics Not Linked with Mental Health Problems"

Researchers in Norway publish results from a population study measuring the relationship between use of psychedelics and mental health problems. After examining data from 130,000 adults in the United States, researcher Teri Krebs and clinical psychologist Pål-Ørjan Johansen discover that lifetime use of psychedelics is not associated with the development of mental health issues. People who have used mescaline, LSD, psilocybin, or peyote are reported to have lower rates of psychological health problems.



August 16, 2013


  Warrior Poet Project Podcast "Warrior Poet Project Podcast Special: MAPS Podcast Featuring Founder Rick Doblin" by Aubrey Marcus.

The Warrior Poet Project Podcast invites MAPS Founder Rick Doblin and psychedelic researcher Charles Grob to engage in a discussion about the role of psychedelics in medicine, the increase of interest and scientific studies focusing on ayahuasca, and how cultural acceptance of psychedelics is rising.



August 14, 2013


  The Libertarian "LSD Still Excessively Restricted, Despite Medical Potential" by Brendan Ferreri-Hanberry.

The Libertarian dedicates an article to the science and politics of research into the therapeutic use of LSD. The article focuses on a variety of medical conditions that could benefit from LSD research, including anxiety, alcoholism, and cluster headaches.



August 12, 2013


  Popular Science "Sanjay Gupta: Only 6 Percent Of Marijuana Research Considers Medical Benefits" by Shaunacy Ferro.

Popular Science reports on Dr. Sanjay Gupta’s call for more research into marijuana’s medical benefits. Brad Burge of MAPS explains, “Dr. Gupta’s gutsy admission will show regulators that even after decades of denial, it’s never too late to change their tune.”



August 9, 2013


  Alternet "Making Psychedelic Trips Safe — Even at Burning Man" by April M. Short.

Alternet showcases the Zendo Project psychedelic harm reduction services, with detailed reports and insight from Linnae Ponté and Brad Burge of MAPS. The article goes into Linnae’s initial interest in harm reduction, how the Zendo Project is helping people around the world, and what the future holds.



August 8, 2013


  Las Vegas Guardian Express "The Power of Pot: Weed for Sick Justified by Gupta" by James Fenner.

The Las Vegas Guardian Express dissects how CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta went from being vocally against medical marijuana to becoming a passionate advocate of the medical benefits of marijuana.


  CNN "Why I Changed My Mind on Weed" by Dr. Sanjay Gupta.

CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta apologizes for his role in providing misleading and inaccurate information about marijuana to the public. He provides a sweeping overview of marijuana research in an effort to educate the public, focusing on the conditions that can potentially benefit from medical marijuana and how research into providing further evidence of its efficacy is being blocked by governmental agencies. He explains, “It doesn’t have a high potential for abuse, and there are very legitimate medical applications. In fact, sometimes marijuana is the only thing that works.” 



August 7, 2013


  The Libertarian "MDMA Still Irrationally Restricted, Despite Medical Benefits" by Brendan Ferreri-Hanberry.

The Libertarian highlights international research conducted by MAPS into the potential benefits of treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. The article details promising research results and invites MAPS Founder Rick Doblin to speak about the efficacy of the treatment. Doblin explains, “When they’re remembering [a traumatic experience] under MDMA it gets reconsolidated without the fear being as strong as it was before.”



August 4, 2013


  Quantum Life Studios "Psychedelic Research & Therapy Interview with Brad Burge of MAPS"

Quantum Life Studios interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about the extensiveness of Psychedelic Science 2013, the concept of using psychedelics as tools, and how psychedelic research is changing the landscape of medicine and science. Burge explains “By doing the science, in a sense, we are performing psychedelic therapy on the culture at large just by directing our attention to these things in a positive, safe way.”



August 3, 2013


  Refinery29 "The Molly Craze Is Back — & Buzzier" by Evan Ross Katz.

Refinery29 investigates the recent popularity of the street drug known as “Molly,” which is often sold as pure MDMA despite frequently containing harmful contaminants. Public intrigue in Molly has recently been building, and Brad Burge of MAPS proposes one reason for the spike in interest. “People are looking for ways to connect, Burge said. “In certain doses, in certain places, certain drugs can produce this feeling of intimacy.”


  Women's Visionary Congress "Review: Women’s Visionary Congress Workshop at the 2013 Psychedelic Science Conference" by Anna Szostek .

Anna Szostek reviews the Psychedelic Science 2013 Women’s Visionary Congress workshop and reflects on how sharing personal stories about psychedelic experiences with peers can be an invaluable tool for personal healing and cultural change.



July 29, 2013


  MAPS "Ayahuasca-Assisted Therapy May Have Benefits for People with Substance Use Disorders"

People suffering from substance use disorders may experience significant benefits from ayahuasca-assisted therapy, according to a recently completed observational study published in the June 2013 edition of Current Drug Abuse Reviews. The first-of-its-kind study reported significant improvements in measures of mental and behavioral health related to substance use disorders, as well as significant reductions in harmful cocaine use following treatment. MAPS was a co-sponsor of this study.

Download the press release…



July 24, 2013


  The Economist "Pointless Deaths" by D.K.

The Economist explores how the criminalization of MDMA and other drugs is spurring the creation of new substances. The article makes a case that recent drug-related fatalities could be have been prevented if public health-oriented policies were implemented.



July 22, 2013


  Being Bipolar "Being Bipolar: Ep. 102 – Psychedelic Harm Reduction"

The Being Bipolar podcast interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about the Zendo Project psychedelic harm reduction services, touching on the history of harm reduction, why it’s important, and his thoughts on the success of the fundraising campaign for the Zendo Project on Indiegogo .


  Independent Voter Network "Legal Drugs Lead to Majority of Overdose Deaths in the United States" by Joseph Avery.

IVN reports on a study indicating that prescription drug overdoses are the largest cause of sudden deaths in the United States. The article highlights MAPS’ promising research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD as an example of how the legal classification of a substance does not necessarily reflect its relative harm or medical utility.



July 21, 2013


  London Real "Rick Doblin - Fighting the Good Fight | London Real"

London Real interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin about the history of MAPS, the promising results of the latest research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, and the concept of using psychedelics as tools.



July 17, 2013


  AlterNet "When Will the Psychiatric Establishment Reject the Drug War and Embrace Psychedelic Research?" by Andrew Penn.

AlterNet republishes Andrew Penn’s article, “Stories Engage, But Data Convinces: Support for Psychedelics in Psychiatry,” originally appearing in the Spring 2013 Special Edition of the MAPS Bulletin. Penn makes the case for clinicians to stay abreast of the current wave of psychedelic research in order to help important medical research become more established.


  AlterNet "Why the Scientific and Medical Establishments Have Such Biased Approaches to Psychedelics" by Ido Hartogsohn.

AlterNet republishes Ido Hartogsohn’s article, “The American Trip: Set, Setting, and Psychedelics in 20th Century Psychology”, originally appearing in the Spring 2013 Special Edition of the MAPS Bulletin. The article compares the differing viewpoints of the scientists who studied psychedelic substances in the 1950s and 1960s, noting that some found inspiring results about the future of consciousness while others came to believe substances like LSD could cause symptoms of mental illnesses.



July 15, 2013


  Cannabis Now "The U.S. War on Knowledge" by Jeremy Daw.

Cannabis Now magazine dives deep into the varied politics of medical marijuana around the world, showing the disparity between individual state laws in the U.S. while explaining why research approval requirements are less strict in Israel than the U.S. The article prominently features MAPS staff, including Founder Rick Doblin and Clinical Research Associate Mimi Peleg.



July 3, 2013


  Motherboard "Can a Low Dose Go a Long Way?" by Brian Anderson.

Motherboard explores the concept and effects of “micro-dosing” with psychedelic substances such as LSD. Psychedelic researcher and author James Fadiman is profiled and quoted in the article, adding further insight into this under-explored area of research.



July 1, 2013


  The Hemp Connoisseur "20ish Questions with David Bronner" by Josh Davis.

The Hemp Connoisseur interviews David Bronner, President of Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soaps, about the use of hemp seeds in soaps, his support for psychedelic research, and how he includes MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin among his mentors and key inspirations for his work.



June 30, 2013


  The Joe Rogan Experience "Joe Rogan Experience #371 - Rick Doblin" by Joe Rogan.

Rick Doblin and Joe Rogan talk about the politics of psychedelic research, human rights, the future of psychedelic therapy, and the importance of awe-inspiring moments on The Joe Rogan Experience podcast.



June 27, 2013


  Vice "A Drug Question Finally Got Asked in Parliament" by Alex Hamer.

While speaking to the Australian parliament on behalf of the public, Senator Di Natale asks, “What is Australia doing to address the current unscientific classification of various drugs and the resulting unnecessary harm and expense this is causing?” The question was posed by Steve McDonald of PRISM: Psychedelic Research in Science & Medicine and was the most popular question during a public vote organized by OurSay. PRISM is helping MAPS work to start Australian research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy.



June 23, 2013


  The Daily Mail "Is MDMA the New Drug of Choice Among New York’s Elite?"

The Daily Mail analyzes the recent popularity of MDMA, providing quotes from scientists and recreational users.


  South China Morning Post "Psychoactive Drugs May be Effective Treatments for Some Disorders"

The South China Morning Post explores the growing field of research looking into psychedelics as part of innovative treatments for serious medical conditions. The article details psychedelic research efforts by Professor David Nutt of Imperial College in London and highlights additional studies from MAPS.



June 22, 2013


  The Fix "Hallucinogens in Addiction Treatment: The Trippy New Era" by Kelly Bourdet.

The Fix looks into the future of research into using psychedelic substances as potential treatment methods for addiction. The article highlights a large variety of psychedelic studies that are producing promising results for the future of treating addiction, as well as other conditions.



June 21, 2013


  Arizona Capitol Times "Let’s End Barriers to Federally Regulated Cannabis Research" by Sue Sisley.

The Arizona Capitol Times gives Dr. Sue Sisley an op-ed to speak about the barriers preventing MAPS-sponsored medical marijuana research in Arizona. Sisley explains that medical professionals from a variety of specialties are in favor of the FDA-approved study, but heavy resistance is coming from NIDA and the DEA, putting her study on “indefinite hold” until something changes.


  The New York Times "Molly: Pure, but Not So Simple" by Irina Aleksander.

The New York Times shares the history of research into MDMA as an adjunct to therapy while exploring how “Molly” has become more prominent in popular culture. “As we move more and more electronic, people are extremely hungry for the opposite: human interaction on a deeper level where you’re not rushing around,” explains MAPS Founder and Executive Director Rick Doblin. He adds, “The rise of Molly is in tune with how people are feeling emotionally.”



June 19, 2013


  Not Just Paleo "Psychedelics for Addiction and How to Change the World with Plants" by Evan Brand.

The Not Just Paleo podcast interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about the promising results from psychedelic research, the differences between for-profit medicine companies and MAPS, and more.



June 16, 2013


  Motherboard "‘Neurons to Nirvana’ Makes the Case for Deeper Scientific Research Into Psychedelics" by DJ Pangburn.

Motherboard speaks directly with the producers of the upcoming documentary, Neurons to Nirvana: Understanding Psychedelic Medicines, a new film about research into the potential medical benefits of psychedelic substances. The conversation ranges from conditions that may benefit from psychedelics to further details about the film.



June 14, 2013


  Time "Drug War Blocking Potential Treatments for Cancer, Alzheimer’s, Journal Claims" by Maia Szalavitz.

Time explains how potential treatments for Alzheimer’s, cancer, depression, and more are facing obstacles preventing scientific research. ““People have not even realized how much research and how many possible new treatments have been blocked by drug laws,” says Professor David Nutt, author of a newly published paper about drug laws and how they affect science and medicine.”


  The Intellectual Gentlemen's Club "The Intellectual Gentlemen’s Club Interviews Brad Burge of MAPS"

The Intellectual Gentlemen’s Club interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about innovative medical treatments developed from psychedelic research, the obstacles surrounding medical marijuana research, and MAPS’ mission.


  Felix Online "Imperial Professor Speaks About Possible Benefits of Illegal Psychoactive Drugs" by Philippa Skett.

Felix Online writes about a new paper published by David Nichols, Leslie King, and Professor David Nutt about how scientific research into the medical benefits of psychedelic substances could contribute to the advancement of medicine and science if government obstacles were not present. The article covers a variety of studies into the medical and therapeutic potential of psychedelics.



June 13, 2013


  New Republic "The Painful Politics of Painkillers" by Colleen Kimmett.

New Republic reports on scientists facing government obstacles preventing clinical research into the medical benefits of marijuana. The article goes into the history of how MAPS Founder Rick Doblin and Donald Abrams worked together to start medical marijuana research in California, and how they have been working closely together to attempt to obtain marijuana from the National Institute of Drug Abuse.


  The Daily Chronic "Maine Lawmakers Expand Medical Marijuana Program to Include PTSD" by Thomas H. Clarke.

The Daily Chronic reports on the decision of lawmakers in Maine to allow PTSD to be accepted as a qualifying condition for medical marijuana. The article provides testimonials from people who have used medical marijuana for PTSD with success, in addition to mentioning how our FDA-approved medical marijuana research for treating PTSD is facing obstacles.



June 12, 2013


  Monday Magazine "Amazonian Treatment Gives Answer"

Monday Magazine delves into the concept of using ayahuasca as a treatment for addiction. The article explains the techniques of ayahuasca therapy and speaks with researchers Dr. Gabor Maté and Philippe Lucas about promising recently published research results.


  The Independent "Scientists Call for Drugs to be Legalised to Allow Proper Study of Their Properties" by Charlie Cooper.

The Independent educates the public about a new paper that explains how innovative treatments for PTSD and depression have been delayed by 30 years as a result of government interference with psychedelic research. Professor David Nutt describes the obstacles as “the worst case of scientific censorship since the Catholic Church banned the works of Copernicus and Galileo.”


  The Conversation "Medical Breakthroughs Missed Because of Pointless Drug Bans" by David Nutt.

Professor David Nutt writes for The Conversation about his thoughts regarding government bans on Schedule I drugs and how medical research is limited as a result. His opinions are explained in a recent paper with David Nichols and Leslie King about how science and medicine would benefit from less interference with psychedelic research.



June 10, 2013


  Smithsonian Magazine "Could “Magic” Mushrooms Be Used to Treat Anxiety and Depression?" by Joseph Stromberg.

Smithsonian Magazine’s blog looks at the potential medical benefits of using psilocybin mushrooms, including how the substance may provide benefits to people suffering from depression and anxiety when administered to volunteers in a clinical setting. The abundance of research into psilocybin and other psychedelics presented at Psychedelic Science 2013 is highlighted, revealing an optimistic perspective on the future of psychedelic studies.



June 7, 2013


  Policymic "The Raver’s Cure – Soldiers’ PTSD Could Be Treated With MDMA" by Roy Klabin.

Policymic comments on the current state of MDMA research, going into detail about how soldiers and veterans with treatment-resistant PTSD may eventually benefit from research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. The article points out that public perception of MDMA is beginning to shift from thinking of it as a party drug to thinking of it as a way to efficiently help heal people with serious trauma.



June 6, 2013


  BBC News "Could Ecstasy Help Treat Soldiers with PTSD?" by Sharon Weinberger.

BBC News explores research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), highlighting quotes from researchers, professors, and a veteran who participated in an ongoing study.



June 5, 2013


  The Arizona Daily Wildcat "Approval Needed for Marijuana Research on Campus" by Stephanie Casanova.

The Arizona Daily Wildcat sheds lights on recent legislative changes surrounding the potential for conducting medical marijuana research at universities in Arizona. A research initiative looking into using medical marijuana to alleviate PTSD symptoms in 50 veterans is unable to begin due to obstacles put in force by various government agencies. Dr. Sue Sisley explains, “To put up barricades for research, like saying that it can’t be done at the university is really unhelpful to the progress of science.”



June 2, 2013


  Scientific American "Hallucinogens Could Ease Existential Terror" by Erica Rex.

Scientific American examines research into psychedelics including LSD and psilocybin as therapeutic adjuncts for helping people alleviate anxiety associated with advanced-stage illnesses, reviewing current and past research conducted by major psychedelic research organizations.


  The Chronicle of Higher Education "Psychedelic Academe" by Zoë Corbyn.

The Chronicle of Higher Education provides a comprehensive review of Psychedelic Science 2013, featuring a summary of the event, a profile on researcher Charles Grob, and informative thoughts about the current and past state of psychedelic research. Download the PDF.



May 31, 2013


  The Fix "America’s Baby-Boomer Potheads" by Victoria Kim.

The Fix speaks with MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin about how adults from the “baby-boomer” generation are becoming more accepting of marijuana due to changing legal and cultural landscapes. Doblin explains his opinion of the changes, musing “What’s so ironic to me is how many people grew up hiding marijuana from their parents, and now they’re hiding marijuana from their kids.”


  Scientific American "How Safe Is Recreational Marijuana?" by Roxanne Khamsi.

Scientific American explores the rise in use of marijuana in the United States, providing an overview of how medicine, laws, culture, and more is changing as a result of an increase in public acceptance.

Clint Werner, author of Marijuana: Gateway to Health, responds to claims about marijuana made in a recent Scientific American article authored by Roxanne Khamsi. Werner details inaccuracies and unfounded claims by providing factual information with referenced sources.


  io9 "Could a Notorious Party Drug Be the Next Psychiatric Breakthrough?" by George Dvorsky.

io9 dives deep into the history of MDMA in therapeutic contexts, focusing on the explosion of research into new treatment methods for PTSD, depression, anxiety, and social anxiety for autistic adults using MDMA as part of therapy.



May 30, 2013


  Motherboard "Is Ecstasy the Key to Alleviating Autism Anxiety?" by Kelly Bourdet.

Motherboard explores our new study into using MDMA-assisted therapy as a way to reduce social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum. The study protocol was approved by the FDA on April 30, 2013, and the study will enroll a total of 12 participants. Study co-investigator Alicia Danforth provides important information about her doctoral dissertation on the use of MDMA by autistic adults that helped lay the groundwork for the new MAPS-sponsored clinical study.


  Alternet "Renowned Doctor Gabor Mate on Psychedelics and Unlocking the Unconscious, From Cancer to Addiction" by Gabor Mate.

Alternet publishes a transcript of addiction expert Gabor Maté‘s presentation at Psychedelic Science 2013, in which Dr. Maté speaks eloquently about research into the healing potential of ayahuasca and whether it can provide benefits to people suffering from addiction or cancer.



May 26, 2013


  To The Best of Our Knowledge "Jim Fadiman on Psychedelics" by Steve Paulson.

Renowned author and researcher James Fadiman, Ph.D. joins the To The Best of Our Knowledge radio show for an interview about psychedelics and their potential for enhancing creativity. Fadiman explains, “These substances are no longer seen as terrifying; they’re being seen as very powerful, like your automobile.”



May 23, 2013


  Alternet "Inside Mind-Tripping, Soul-Changing, Ground-Shifting, 21st Century Psychedelic Therapy" by Don Lattin.

Author Don Lattin explores the recent resurgence in psychedelic research that is currently happening around the world. Lattin details how research into psychedelic substances is increasing public perception of psychedelics due to the development of innovative treatment methods for a variety of serious medical conditions.

Note: This article first appeared in Spirituality & Health magazine under the title “The Second Coming of Psychedelics.”


  Alternet "How Ecstasy Can Take You on the Healing Path ... Even for a Former Nun" by Ralph Metzner.

Alternet shares excerpts about the therapeutic potential of MDMA from researcher Ralph Metzner’s book, Through the Gateway of the Heart; Accounts of Experiences with MDMA and Other Emphathonic Substances. The article explores the potential benefits of using MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD, details the possible beneficial effects of the drug on people with anxiety, and highlights an ex-nun’s experience with MDMA treatment.



May 22, 2013


  The Raw Story "FDA Approves First Study on Ecstasy-Assisted Therapy for Social Anxiety in Autistic Adults" by Eric W. Dolan.

The Raw Story reports on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s decision to approve MAPS’ new study that will explore the safety and therapeutic potential of MDMA-assisted therapy as a treatment for social anxiety adults on the autism spectrum. The study will take place at the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center/Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute.


  East Bay Express "Can Pot Help Cure PTSD?" by David Downs.

East Bay Express discusses research presented at Psychedelic Science 2013 by Yale associate professor Andrew Sewell indicating that medical marijuana may provide benefits to people undergoing PTSD treatment. Sewell’s study focuses primarily on a PTSD treatment method known as exposure therapy, and his research shows that adding marijuana treatments can expedite the process by increasing extinction learning.



May 17, 2013


  Therapy Today "The Magical Mystery Cure" by Richard Shrubb.

The official journal of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy explores how current psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy research is providing innovative treatment methods for assisting people suffering from serious mental health conditions. The potential benefits of LSD-assisted therapy for end-of-life anxiety and MDMA-assisted treatments for PTSD and social anxiety are detailed, providing an inspiring overview of new ways to efficiently help people.



May 16, 2013


  Psych Central "Psychedelic Science Can Help With Anxiety And Depression" by Gerti Schoen.

Psych Central details how recent scientific research into psychedelic drugs including LSD, MDMA, and psilocybin is providing innovative treatment methods that may potentially benefit serious mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety, and PTSD.



May 15, 2013


  Think Progress "How Drug War Posturing Is Blocking Access To A Potential Treatment For Veterans" by Nicole Flatow.

Think Progress reports about the results from a new study conducted at New York University measuring the connection between the number of cannabinoid receptors in the brain and the effects of PTSD while highlighting other recent research. The article also details the government interference that is preventing scientists from accessing the legal supply of marijuana to be used for research purposes.



May 14, 2013


  The Burt Cohen Show "Report From Psychedelic Science 2013 Conference" by Burt Cohen.

Brad Burge of MAPS is interviewed on the Burt Cohen Show about the success of Psychedelic Science 2013, describing what happened when almost 2,000 attendees gathered together to learn about psychedelic research from over 100 speakers. Burge explains the process of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research in detail while also covering other successful psychedelic research currently taking place around the world.


  SeekersWay "SeekersWay Interview with Brad Burge of MAPS"

SeekersWay interviews MAPS Director of Communication Brad Burge in Oakland at Psychedelic Science 2013, focusing on the success of the event, the connection between psychedelics and spirituality, and how new psychedelic research is providing innovative treatment methods for a variety of serious medical conditions.



May 9, 2013


  Les In Rocks "Ecstasy: The Medicine of the Future?" by Maxime Robin.

French magazine Les In Rocks covers the success of MAPS’ research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. Researcher Michael Mithoefer speaks about his experience conducting studies using MDMA as well as his expectations for the future of psychedelic research.


  Metro News "Hard Drugs Offer Hope in Mental Health Crises" by Kieron Monks.

Metro News details how scientists are researching drugs including LSD, psilocybin, and MDMA as potential treatment methods for a variety of mental health conditions including addiction, PTSD, depression, anxiety, and more.



May 8, 2013


  KNAU Arizona Public Radio "Medical Marijuana Approved For Campus Research" by Howard Fischer.

KNAU Arizona Public Radio reports on a new law allowing medical marijuana research to be conducted on university campuses in Arizona. MAPS’ Principal Investigator for medical marijuana research, Dr. Sue Sisley explains, “I think that’s the real purpose of a public university, to be able to examine subjects that are hard or controversial or complex in an environment that isn’t plagued by politics.” Sisley is looking to study the effects of medical marijuana for veterans with treatment-resistant PTSD and she has already begun to receive approval from necessary entities.


  International Center for Ethnobotanical Research & Service (ICEERS) "Review: Psychedelic Science Conference 2013"

International Center for Ethnobotanical Research & Service (ICEERS) reviews their experience of attending Psychedelic Science 2013, providing recaps of presentations, workshops, key events, and much more.



May 4, 2013


  The Yorker "A Sensible Drugs Policy" by Simon Lillistone.

The Yorker reports on the political climate in the United Kingdom that surrounds Professor David Nutt’s proposal to research the medical potential of psilocybin mushrooms. Author Simon Lillistone presents an overview of current psychedelic research, detailing how conditions including PTSD, depression, and anxiety may benefit from further studies.



May 3, 2013


  Medical Marijuana 411 "Dr. Sue Sisley Talks About Medical Marijuana, PTSD and Scientific Freedom" by Sam Sabzehzar.

Dr. Sue Sisley tells Medical Marijuana 411 about why she believes medical marijuana can help people suffering from PTSD, and how NIDA and the DEA are preventing clinical research into the healing potential of marijuana.


  Wired "A Psychedelic-Science Advocate Takes His Case to the Pentagon" by Greg Miller.

Greg Miller of Wired interviews MAPS Founder and Executive Director Rick Doblin about his recent visits to the Pentagon to discuss treating PTSD in veterans with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy with senior military officials. Doblin also discusses the success of the Psychedelic Science 2013 conference and events, explains how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy works, and shares his vision for the future of psychedelic medicine.



May 2, 2013


  Sofia University "Psychedelic Experience: Healing, Growth and Discovery"

Sofia University hosts a live discussion between psychedelic researcher James Fadiman, Ph.D., and Brad Burge of MAPS about the potential for psychedelics to be used as tools for healing, growth, and discovery.



April 30, 2013


  The Dr. Future Show "Interview with Philippe Lucas, MA - Ayahuasca Use in Drug Addiction" by Digeratti Allan Lundell.

The Dr. Future Show interviews Philippe Lucas, MA at Psychedelic Science 2013 about scientific research into ayahuasca, cannabis, and other substances.


  Irish Examiner "Irish Scientists Leading Street Drug Research" by Ollie Moore.

Irish Examiner reports about current research into psychedelics and marijuana, sharing a list of medical conditions benefiting from these scientific studies. The article goes on to examines the scientific and political landscape surrounding current and future research.



April 29, 2013


  Vice "Would You Take MDMA for Therapy?" by William Alexander.

Vice conducts a series of spontaneous interviews with people on the streets of London with the aim of deducing whether or not the general public is open to the idea of using MDMA as an adjunct to therapy.


  Right Side News "Progressives Now Want “Psychedelic Medicine”" by Cliff Kincaid.

Right Side News writes about the current psychedelic research movement that is generating new treatment methods for a variety of medical treatments. The article highlights psychedelic research and educational initiatives being promoted by MAPS.



April 27, 2013


  Vice "Can MDMA Cure PTSD?" by Dave Dean.

Vice examines the merits of using MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD by summarizing past, current, and upcoming research. The article dedicates much of its length to the imminent research that will take place in Canada, noting that the necessary MDMA to be used in the study has been exported from Switzerland to Canada.



April 26, 2013


  Healthline "Psychedelic Drugs Still Popular in the U.S." by Alexia Severson .

Healthline reports on a new study of psychedelic usage among US citizens. The study authors estimate that 32 million people in the U.S. have taken a psychedelic such as LSD, psilocybin, or mescaline, noting that men aged 30-34 show the highest level of exposure to psychedelics.


  Reason "Psychedelic Science: Still Hassled by the Man" by Brian Doherty.

Reason shares the groundbreaking success of Psychedelic Science 2013, sharing information about current psychedelic research initiatives aiming to create new treatment methods for a variety of medical conditions.


  Wired Magazine "Open Your Mind to the New Psychedelic Science" by Greg Miller.

Wired Magazine attends Psychedelic Science 2013 and shares how scientists and doctors around the world have “rekindled the scientific study of psychedelics.” Greg Miller’s article takes the science seriously while acknowledging that it isn’t science as usual but rather an exciting new field with impacts in neuroscience research as well as technology and medicine.


  Motherboard "The Biggest Psychedelic Research Group Is Asking the Pentagon to Help Kill PTSD" by Brian Anderson.

Motherboard writes about the recent visit to the Pentagon of MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin, PhD, to discuss MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research and encourage support for the studies. Article author Brian Anderson explains, “It’s a fool’s errand to say that the US military entertaining the idea of working with a reknowned psychedelics research group isn’t a sign that our notions of both war and therapeutic (and illicit) drugs aren’t changing, and quick.”


  Courthouse News Service "Court Snuffs Professor’s Bid to Grow Pot" by Chris Fry.

Courthouse News Service details a federal court’s decision to side with the Drug Enforcement Agency in a case revolving around the regulation of research-quality marijuana. Professor Lyle Craker has been fighting for 12 years to end the NIDA monopoly on marijuana for research in an attempt to help people suffering from serious medical conditions.


  CBC "The 180 - Psychedelic Medicine"

CBC interviews ayahuasca researcher Gerald Thomas about his recently completed Canadian MAPS-sponsored study of ayahuasca. Thomas educates the CBC audience about the benefits of ayahuasca, sharing early reactions from his study.


  AlterNet "The Enormous Promise of Psychedelics for Sustaining Health, Happiness and Sanity" by April M. Short.

AlterNet reviews Psychedelic Science 2013, detailing the documented benefits that psychedelic research is providing. While explaining current research initiatives, the review also notes the large presence of ayahuasca researchers, appreciates the friendly community, and details future plans for studies.



April 25, 2013


  Drug Truth Network "Drug Truth Network Interviews Brad Burge"

Drug Truth Network interviews MAPS Director of Communications Brad Burge in a podcast focusing on Psychedelic Science 2013. Burge underscores the success of the conference while speaking about conference events and the large turnout of researchers and attendees interested in the science surrounding psychedelic substances.


  Daily Californian "Psychedelic Science" by Neha Kulsh.

The Daily Californian at UC Berkeley reviews of Psychedelic Science 2013, summarizing lectures and new information about clinical studies into psychedelics and more. The article notes the success of this wave of research, offering optimism for further studies.



April 24, 2013


  Medical Daily "Vancouver Ecstasy Treatment Trial Underway For PTSD" by Jonathan Weiss.

Medical Daily shares the news that MAPS is bringing research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to Canada. Nine grams of MDMA have been exported to Canada from Switzerland, marking a significant step forward in our international effort to help people suffering from PTSD.


  Backbencher "The Success of MDMA-Assisted Therapy" by Sam Woolfe.

Backbencher provides an extensive overview of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, highlighting the innovative treatment method as a tool to help people overcome treatment-resistant PTSD. The article takes a look at possibilities for future research while listing locations around the world where MDMA research continues.



April 23, 2013


  WDTV "Study Looks at How Ecstasy Can Possibly Treat PTSD" by Whitney Wetzel.

WDTV provides coverage of current research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, educating their audience about how psychedelic therapy can help people overcome medical conditions.



April 22, 2013


  Popular Science "FYI: Is Ecstasy Safer When It’s Purer?" by Shaunacy Ferro.

Popular Science explores common misconceptions and scientific research into MDMA. The article provides quotes from MAPS Clinical Investigator Michael Mithoefer, who explains that drugs bought and sold illegally often contain added components that can dramatically increase their risk.


  The Cincinnati Enquirer "Ecstasy Studied to Treat PTSD" by Lisa Bernard-Kuhn.

The Cincinnati Enquirer reports on the current state of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatments in response to a new $9 million study of PTSD to be conducted in Cincinnati. The article highlights MAPS’ research efforts, detailing how treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can help people overcome treatment resistant PTSD.



April 21, 2013


  Stop the Drug War "Psychedelic Science Conference Examines MDMA Treatment for PTSD" by Phillip Smith.

Stop the Drug War reports on Psychedelic Science 2013, sharing information from a variety of lectures on using MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD. The article features quotes from researchers and veterans, providing an optimistic outlook for the future of treating PTSD.



April 20, 2013


  Southern California Public Radio "Conference Examines Medical Uses of Hallucinogens" by Southern California Public Radio.

Southern California Public Radio reports on Psychedelic Science 2013, noting the abundance of scientific research results being shared while highlighting other facets of the event.


  UOL "U.S. Conference on Psychedelic Science Highlights Use of Ayahuasca" by Carlos Minuano .

UOL provides coverage of Psychedelic Science 2013 by highlighting the event’s diversity in subject matter and attendees. The article also provides an overview of the large ayahuasca presence, sharing information about the psychedelic’s popularity in research and culture.



April 19, 2013


  SF Weekly "Psychedelics Conference to Show How Ecstacy, LSD Can Cure Some Serious Social Ills" by Rachel Swan.

SF Weekly reports on Psychedelic Science 2013.


  Oxford University Press "Celebrating Bicycle Day" by Amanda Feilding.

The Beckley Foundation Founder Amanda Feilding details the history of Bicycle Day, the anniversary of the first intentional LSD experience. Feilding provides insight into the resurgence of psychedelic research, remarking on the success of research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD and other initiatives.


  CBC "Ecstasy Pills OK’d for Vancouver PTSD-Treatment Trial" by Kathleen Harris.

CBC News announces that nine grams of MDMA have been exported to Canada from Switzerland to be used in our upcoming study of using MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD, led by psychologist Andrew Feldmar.


  Southern California Public Radio "Psychedelic Science Conference Explores Medical and Therapeutic Value of LSD, Ecstasy and Psilocybin" by Stephanie O'Neill.

Southern California Public Radio explores Psychedelic Science 2013. Scientists are presenting massive amounts of research results indicating that psychedelics such as LSD, MDMA, psilocybin, ayahuasca, and more can provide benefits to people suffering from serious medical conditions.



April 18, 2013


  The National Post "LSD Gets a Second Look in Eye-Opening Documentary" by Chris Knight.

The National Post reviews The Substance, a new documentary about the history of LSD. The article highlights the therapeutic potential of LSD-assisted psychotherapy while also covering psychedelic research into using MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD.


  Popular Science "Why It’s So Hard For Scientists To Study Medical Marijuana" by Shaunacy Ferro.

Popular Science reports on the state of medical marijuana research, noting that studies are being blocked by governmental agencies such as the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Drug Enforcement Agency. After an unsuccessful twelve-year struggle in court with these agencies, Professor Lyle Craker explains, “If you’re going to run a trial to show this is going to have positive effects, they’re essentially not going to allow it.”



April 17, 2013


  Stop the Drug War "Federal Appeals Court Rejects Researcher’s Bid to Grow Medical Marijuana" by Phillip Smith.

Stop the Drug War takes a critical look at the US First Circuit Court of Appeals’ ruling against Prof. Lyle Craker’s lawsuit against the Drug Enforcement Agency for denying him a license to grow marijuana for research. This decision comes twelve years after Prof. Craker decided to take action against the anti-science policies that prevent federally sanctioned studies of the medical benefits of marijuana.



April 16, 2013


  Popular Science "Why Doctors Can’t Give You LSD (But Maybe They Should)" by Shaunacy Ferro.

Popular Science explores the therapeutic use of psychedelics such as LSD and psilocybin, providing information about scientific studies and insights from notable researchers in the field.


  Good Times Weekly "Power Plants" by J.D. Ramey.

Good Times Weekly reports on the Ayahuasca Track at Psychedelic Science 2013, calling it the largest gathering of ayahuasca researchers ever. In addition to the healing potential of ayahuasca, the article notes how research into LSD, MDMA, and psilocybin is moving forward with success.



April 15, 2013


  MAPS "Press Release: U.S. First Circuit Court Upholds NIDA Monopoly on Marijuana for Research"

On April 15, 2013, the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit rejected University of Massachusetts-Amherst Prof. Lyle Craker’s lawsuit against the Drug Enforcement Administration for denying him a license to grow marijuana for privately funded medical research. With its decision, the Court has ensured that the debate over the medical use of marijuana will continue to take place through political battles rather than through scientific research.


  Bloomberg News "Marijuana Research Funding Cut as Support for Drug Grows" by Elizabeth Lopatto.

Bloomberg News provides a comprehensive overview of how medical marijuana research is facing significant government-imposed obstacles. The National Institute of Drug Abuse’s refusal to provide marijuana necessary is impeding comprehensive study proposals. Bob Melamede, CEO of Cannabis Science Inc., elaborates, “If you want to run a study to show it cures cancer, they will not provide you with marijuana.”



April 8, 2013


  Reality Sandwich "Psychedelic Convergence in Oakland" by Nese Devenot.

Reality Sandwich contributor Nese Devenot interviews MAPS Director of Communications Brad Burge about Psychedelic Science 2013, touching upon the diversity of the event, attendance milestones, and how the public perception of psychedelics is continuing to become more accepting.


  Santa Cruz Patch "Psychedelic Science Conference in Oakland April 18-23" by David Jay Brown.

Santa Cruz Patch author David Jay Brown previews Psychedelic Science 2013, sharing glimpses into topics about psychedelic research, various events, and much more.



April 7, 2013


  Medical Daily "Hallucinogenic Mushrooms May Help Treat Depression, If Britain’s Regulators Get Out Of The Way" by Matthew Mientka.

Medical Daily reports on the obstacles preventing further psilocybin research from taking place in the United Kingdom. Professor David Nutt’s previous research indicated that psilocybin could be used to help treat depression, though his new proposal for additional studies is currently stuck in a standstill.


  New York Magazine "Travels in the New Psychedelic Bazaar" by Vanessa Grigoriadis .

New York Magazine explores the current state of psychedelics, highlighting the therapeutic and medical potential of psychedelics while also exploring the emergence of new synthetic drugs. The article showcases current research, providing readers with information about how scientists are creating innovative treatment methods for medical conditions such as PTSD, anxiety, and more.



April 6, 2013


  Reuters "First Magic Mushroom Depression Trial Hits Stumbling Block" by Kate Kelland.

Reuters exposes Professor David Nutt’s successful research into using psilocybin as a treatment method for depression. Further research is being prevented by government-imposed obstacles. Nutt explains his current mission, “What we are trying to do is to tap into the reservoir of under-researched illegal drugs to see if we can find new and beneficial uses for them in people whose lives are often severely affected by illnesses such as depression.”



April 3, 2013


  The Lawrentian "Research Supports Benefits of Psychedelic Substances" by Laura Udelson.

The Lawrentian reports on how a discussion about the benefits of treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy was hosted at Lawrence University. The conversation also touched upon the use of psychedelics for creativity and problem solving, and was led by MAPS Executive and Clinical Research Assistant Linnae Ponté, featuring an appearance from MAPS Founder Rick Doblin via video teleconference.



April 1, 2013


  The Daily Campus "Stigma Shouldn’t Prevent Drug Research"

The Daily Campus looks at the current state of drug research while comparing the medical and recreational uses of various drugs. The article highlights marijuana’s anticancer properties, MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD, and more.



March 30, 2013


  BWOG "The Truth About Molly"

Columbia University’s student-run online magazine reviews an event where researchers came together to thoroughly discuss MDMA, from its increasing prevalence in popular culture to its potential to treat serious conditions such as PTSD. The event was organized by Columbia’s Students for Sensible Drug Policy chapter and featured panelists Allison Bajger, a doctoral candidate at Columbia, Ingmar Gorman, a doctoral candidate at the New School, Brittany Lewis of Global Grind, and Dr. Lewis-McCoy from CUNY’s City College.



March 27, 2013


  Kamloops News "MDMA Drug Research Offers Promise" by David Charbonneau.

Kamloops News reports on the recent approval of MAPS’ upcoming Canadian study focusing on treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. After the long review process, Health Canada is giving us permission to import 9 grams of MDMA to be used in the study.


  The Intellectual Gentlemen’s Club Podcast "Alexander Ward Speaks About Shamanism and Psychedelics"

Hosts Jason and Matt Abbott of The Intellectual Gentlemen’s Club Podcast speak with Alexander Ward about ayahuasca, shamanism, MDMA, psilocybin, MAPS, and much more.


  Backbencher "Medicinal Drugs: Is Psychedelic Therapy the Future?" by Sam Woolfe.

Sam Woolfe of Backbencher reports on the current state of psychedelic-assisted therapy, highlighting MAPS in addition to Dr. Robin Carhart-Harris’ psilocybin and LSD research. The article presents the idea of a future where doctors and therapists will efficiently use psychedelic-assisted therapy to benefit their patients.



March 21, 2013


  Alternet "Cannabis Helped Heal My Cancer" by Michelle Aldrich.

Michelle Aldrich writes for Alternet about how people diagnosed with cancer can benefit from medical marijuana. She mentions how MAPS Founder Rick Doblin’s recommendation of a specific therapist helped her healing process move in a much quicker pace.


  The San Francisco Chronicle "Sofia University to Sponsor Psychedelic Science 2013 International Conference"

The San Francisco Chronicle highlights Sofia University’s increasing popularity for students interested in careers in psychedelic research and medicine. Sofia University is hoping to attract new students to their unique programs by co-sponsoring Psychedelic Science 2013 and hosting an upcoming lecture focusing on similar subject matter featuring James Fadiman, Ph.D., and Brad Burge of MAPS.



March 12, 2013


  Alternet "The Psychedelic Future of the Mind" by Craig K. Comstock.

Alternet reviews psychedelic researcher Thomas Roberts’ new book, The Psychedelic Future of the Mind, which explores current psychedelic studies and how future psychedelic research may move beyond a purely medical context. While summarizing the contents of the book, the author highlights efforts from MAPS, Johns Hopkins University, and more in their pursuit of validating the benefits of psychedelics through scientific research.



March 9, 2013


  The Boston Globe "Doctors Call for Study of Marijuana" by Chelsea Conaboy.

The Boston Globe provides a detailed account of medical marijuana in both scientific and legal contexts. Despite its Schedule I status, MAPS’ proposed medical marijuana research has received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Professor Lyle Craker won a 2009 Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Administrative Law Judge hearing and is now suing the DEA for rejecting his application to start a farm to provide marijuana to privately-funded research. MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin is interviewed, speaking on how the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the DEA are preventing vital research from happening.



March 5, 2013


  Mind Body Health and Politics "Dr. Miller Interviews Dr. Rick Doblin" by Dr. Richard Miller .

Dr. Richard Miller of Mind Body Health and Politics interviews MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin about his interest in psychedelics, the history and politics surrounding psychedelic research, and how studies conducted by MAPS are developing effective treatment methods for a variety of medical conditions.



February 26, 2013


  Fox News "Psychedelic Science Conference Highlights Therapeutic Benefits of Mind-Altering Drugs" by Chris Kilham.

Fox News contributor Chris Kilham provides an overview of psychedelics and their use in clinical studies, while linking the research to upcoming presentations at Psychedelic Science 2013.


  Research Radio "A Return Trip: LSD Gets a Second Look"

Research Radio at The New School for Social Research analyzes the past half-century of psychedelic research in an expansive segment featuring New School anthropologist Nick Langlitz. The program details studies focusing on the medical potential of psychedelics, the birth of the psychedelic counterculture, and the future of clinical research into substances including MDMA, LSD, and psilocybin.



February 25, 2013


  Think Progress "If All Science Were Run Like Marijuana Research, Creationists Would Control Paleontology" by Nicole Flatow.

Think Progress encapsulates comments made by theoretical physicist John H. Schwarz of the California Institute of Technology regarding the medical marijuana research blockade enforced by NIDA and the DEA. Schwarz posits, “Imagine what would happen to the environment if we gave coal and oil companies the power to block any climate research they didn’t like.”



February 22, 2013


  KTVU "Decades-Old Club Drug Sees Resurgence"

Bay Area television channel KTVU provides insight into the recent rise in popularity of MDMA, citing numerous references in music and other outlets.


  The Daily Chronic "Arizona Bill to Allow Medical Marijuana Research Advances" by Thomas H. Clarke .

The Daily Chronic reports on the current state of medical marijuana research in Arizona. A new bill that will end the ban on researching medical marijuana at Arizona colleges is advancing through legislature. After receiving approval from the Food and Drug Administration and the University of Arizona’s Institutional Review Board, Dr. Sue Sisley’s proposed research into the benefits of medical marijuana for treating PTSD is facing further obstacles as research resistance is maintained by the Drug Enforcement Agency and the National Institute of Drug Abuse.



February 21, 2013


  NPR News Station WBUR 90.9 FM "UMass Professor Blocked From Growing Marijuana For Medical Research" by Deborah Becker and Lynn Jolicoeur.

Boston’s NPR News Station WBUR 90.9 FM interviews Rick Doblin, Ph.D., of MAPS and Professor Lyle Craker about the federal government’s medical marijuana blockade and how it is affecting proposed scientific research.



February 20, 2013


  AZ Central "Arizona Senate Panel OKs Plan to Clarify Medical-Pot Law" by Lindsey Collom.

AZ Central explains how the Senate Health and Human Services committee of Arizona have approved a bill that would allow medical marijuana research to be conducted at university and college campuses in Arizona. Dr. Sue Sisley aims to conduct research at the University of Arizona, and has proposed a study into the potential benefits of using medical marijuana to treat PTSD. The study has received approval from all required entities except for the Drug Enforcement Agency and the National Institute of Drug Abuse, who continue to block the research.



February 19, 2013


  KPCC Southern California Public Radio "Easing End-of-Life Anxiety With Psychedelic Drugs" by Larry Mantle.

AirTalk, a KPCC Southern California Public Radio program, educates their audience about how research into the benefits of psychedelics is creating new, effective treatment methods for a variety of serious medical conditions. KPCC interviews researchers Anthony P. Bossis, Ph.D. and Charles Grob, M.D. about the resurgence of studying psychedelics.



February 11, 2013


  Herbal Gram Magazine "The Quiet Giant: Israel’s Discreet and Successful Medicinal Cannabis Program" by Lindsay Stafford Mader .

Herbal Gram Magazine provides a sweeping overview of Israel’s successful research into the benefits of medical marijuana, which has started a nationwide change in health care. MAPS Founder & Executive Director Rick Doblin explains, “We have insurance companies deciding it is a smart investment to cover medical marijuana. Israel is the only place I know of where that happens.”



February 4, 2013


  ABC News Charleston "Mt. Pleasant Doctor Using Ecstasy to Treat PTSD in veterans" by Dean Stephens.

ABC News Charleston provides coverage of MAPS’ research MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD, featuring interviews with Clinical Investigator Michael Mithoefer, M.D., and Ret. Maj. Ricky Smith, a veteran who participated in the study.



February 1, 2013


  Salon "Take Ecstasy, Save Your Relationship" by Katie McDonough.

Salon publishes an article about how MDMA can positively affect relationships, pushing the conversation about the drug’s benefits into mainstream consciousness.


  Cannabration "Rick Doblin Responds to Former DEA Administrator About Marijuana Research" by Rick Doblin.

MAPS Founder & Executive Director Rick Doblin responds to former DEA administrator Robert Bonner’s claims that “not a single scientifically valid study by a qualified researcher has ever been denied by the DEA or, for that matter, by the National Institute of Drug Abuse.”


  The Los Angeles Times "The DEA’s Pot Defense [Blowback]" by Robert Bonner.

The Los Angeles Times allows former DEA administrator Robert Bonner to respond to a recent editorial that criticizes the agency’s actions (and inactions) regarding marijuana research.



January 31, 2013


  The Atlantic "The Case for Using Drugs to Enhance Our Relationships (and Our Break-Ups)"

The Atlantic interviews Oxford ethicist Brian Earp about his advocacy for using MDMA as a way to strengthen relationships. Earp specifically mentions treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as one of the other innovative uses of MDMA.



January 25, 2013


  The Los Angeles Times "The DEA’s Marijuana Mistake"

The Los Angeles Times offers an editorial about how the DEA and NIDA’s interference with medical marijuana research proposals is the cause of a recent ruling to keep the drug listed as Schedule I. Regarding the DEA’s actions, the article offers perspective; “For a muscular agency that combats vicious drug criminals, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration acts like a terrified and obstinate toddler when it comes to basic science. “


  Policymic "Marijuana Legalization Struggles: The Ridiculous Rule That’s Preventing It From Happening" by Gary Bryan.

Policymic writes about how activists are working hard to get government-approved medical marijuana research to take place after a recent court ruling decided against rescheduling marijuana to acknowledge its medical benefits.



January 22, 2013


  Americans for Safe Access "D.C. Circuit Denies Medical Marijuana Reclassification Challenge, Advocates Vow to Appeal"

Americans for Safe Access issues a statement after a federal court rejects their lawsuit against the DEA to reschedule medical marijuana. Citing lack of scientific studies, clinical research into medical marijuana is more important than ever.



January 18, 2013


  The Globe and Mail "High Hopes: Why Science is Seeking a Pardon for Psychedelics" by Taras Grescoe.

The Globe and Mail covers the recent resurgence of psychedelic research, detailing how new clinical studies are contributing to the development of new, innovative treatments for PTSD, addiction, depression, and more.



January 17, 2013


  Mirror "Can Ecstasy Help Victims of a Trauma? Scientists in US Test MDMA for Medical Uses" by Miriam Stoppard.

Mirror provides analysis of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research results, explaining that the treatment can help people overcome posttraumatic stress disorder by providing factual statistics.



January 16, 2013


  Jane's Defence Weekly "Ecstasy Could Hold Key to Effective Treatment of PTSD" by Richard Shrubb.

Jane’s Defence Weekly provides detailed coverage of our recently completed Swiss study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a PTSD treatment, highlighting the need for a new, effective treatment method to help veterans.



January 14, 2013


  The Living Hero Radio Show "Trips Beyond Addiction" by Jari Chevalier.

The Living Hero Radio Show showcases Trips Beyond Addiction, a new audio documentary focusing on how scientists are exploring psychedelics in the treatment of addiction, featuring interviews from Brad Burge of MAPS and other knowledgeable guests.



January 13, 2013


  Slate "The Countess of Psychedelic Drugs" by Graham Lawton.

Amanda Feilding shares her story about founding The Beckley Foundation, researching psychedelic drugs, and much more.



January 9, 2013


  The Examiner "Arizona Researcher Will Lobby for Marijuana Research at U of A" by Ruth Ann Monti.

The Examiner writes about how Dr. Sue Sisley aims to use the University of Arizona as a research facility to conduct studies focusing on treating PTSD with medical marijuana.


  TruthOut "PTSD: The Soldier’s Private War" by Robert Wilbur and James L Knoll IV.

TruthOut takes a detailed look at posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), reviewing traditional treatments and exploring new, innovative treatment methods. The article highlights MAPS’ research proposal for treating PTSD with medical marijuana at the University of Arizona, as well as our promising studies using MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD.



January 6, 2013


  AZ Daily Sun "Physician Wants Change in Med Pot Law for Research Purposes" by Howard Fischer Capitol Media Services.

Dr. Sue Sisley’s proposal to conduct medical marijuana research at the University of Arizona meets legal resistance after receiving the necessary approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the university’s Institutional Review Board.



January 4, 2013


  Spirituality & Health Magazine "The Second Coming of Psychedelics" by Don Lattin.

Don Lattin, author of Distilled Spirits and The Harvard Psychedelic Club, publishes an extensive report for Spirituality & Health Magazine on the recent wave of psychedelic research that is creating new, innovative treatment methods for medical conditions such as PTSD, addiction, anxiety, and more. International media coverage of psychedelic research is slowly increasing mainstream recognition of the need for research into substances such as LSD, MDMA, ayahuasca, and psilocybin. Neşe Devenot of Psychedemia notes, “You can talk about this now at the dinner table without coming across as some kind of fanatic.”



January 2, 2013


  PR Newswire "New Swiss Study Adds More Evidence For Treating PTSD With MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy" by MAPS.

Subjects with chronic, treatment-resistant posttraumatic stress disorder experienced clinically meaningful improvements and no evidence of harm after participating in a small Swiss study evaluating MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, according to a paper published yesterday in the Journal of Psychopharmacology.

Download the official press release (PDF).


contract 2012 Media Articles...


December 28, 2012


  National Post "Canada Approves Use of Ecstasy in Study into Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder" by David P. Ball.

The National Post provides coverage of Health Canada’s decision to allow MDMA research to be conducted in Canada. Researchers Dr. Ingrid Pacey and Andrew Feldmár will import nine grams of MDMA from a Swiss laboratory in order to to conduct studies focusing on treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy.



December 27, 2012


  Dame Magazine "MDMA Could Help with PTSD" by Daiana Feuer.

Dame Magazine offers a short, comedic perspective on the use of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD.


  The Guardian "Rick Doblin Responds to The Guardian" by Rick Doblin.

MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin offers his input in response to an article featured on The Guardian. While touching upon the author’s and commenters’ points, Rick provides clarification about our MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research.


  The Guardian "MDMA Could Be Effective in Treating Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder – Study" by Suzi Gage.

The Guardian highlights scientific research results indicating that Treating PTSD with MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy can help participants overcome PTSD without causing memory impairment or proclivity to drug abuse. Read MAPS Founder Rick Doblin’s response to the article and its comments here.



December 26, 2012


  Digital Journal "MDMA for PTSD: Studies Shows Benefit But Spark Controversy" by Kathleen Blanchard.

Digital Journal writes about how research into an illegal drug, MDMA, is stirring up minor controversy while simultaneously helping people overcome PTSD.


  Reason "How to Discredit Research on MDMA’s Benefits: First, Misread the Abstract" by Jacob Sullum .

Jacob Sullum of Reason corrects Kent Sepkowitz’s inaccurate claims about MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research from an article posted on The Daily Beast. Sullum provides the facts necessary to refute the unfounded claims, in addition to providing his own views on MDMA research. Read The Daily Beast’s orginal article and read MAPS Founder Rick Doblin’s response to the Daily Beast article.


  The Daily Beast "Rick Doblin Responds to “Ecstasy to Treat PTSD? Not So Fast”" by Rick Doblin.

MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin corrects The Daily Beast author Kent Sepkowitz’s inaccurate claims about research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy by providing factual, scientific information.


  The Daily Beast "Ecstasy to Treat PTSD? Not So Fast" by Kent Sepkowitz.

Kent Sepkowitz writes for The Daily Beast, incorrectly claiming that our completed pilot study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD did not reach statistical significance and accusing researchers of overstating the results. Read MAPS Founder Rick Doblin’s response here and Jacob Sullum of Reason’s coverage of the conflicting information here.

UPDATE: On January 7, 2013, Kent Sepkowitz posted an apology for misreading the study results. Read the update here.



December 21, 2012


  Health Aim "MDMA And Psychotherapy Enlisted In Brain Trauma Fight" by Toi Williams.

Health Aim writes about how research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy is providing hope for people diagnosed with PTSD while profiling the researchers, Dr. Michael Mithoefer and Ann Mithoefer.



December 20, 2012


  Marine Corps Times "Study: Ecstasy Ingredient May Help Treat PTSD" by Patricia Kime.

Marine Corps Times writes about promising research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. The article highlights current research and results, while mentioning upcoming research that will focus on veterans, police officers, and firefighters.



December 18, 2012


  SF Gate "Money Is the Only Problem Stopping the Legalization of Marijuana" by Debby Goldsberry.

SF Gate writes about the legalization of marijuana, highlighting how a variety of organizations, including the Drug Policy Alliance, NORML, MAPS, High Times Magazine, and others are working toward changing how the public feels about marijuana through social campaigns, research initiatives, and educational efforts.



December 17, 2012


  Medscape "Ecstasy-Assisted Psychotherapy Effective, Durable for PTSD" by Megan Brooks.

Medscape covers our research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, noting that the study helped 83% of participants overcome their previously treatment-resistant PTSD. The article goes on to talk about the future of the treatment, citing hopeful projections of future research.



December 8, 2012


  The National Post "MDMA, PTSD and Me: Recent Drug Trials Bring Up a Past Life Researching Ecstasy" by Mireille Silcoff.

Mireille Silcoff writes for The National Post and shares her passionate perspective regarding MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research and how it can be helpful for people suffering from PTSD.



December 7, 2012


  Fierce Biotech "Ecstasy Ingredient Green-Lighted for Controversial PTSD Study" by Ryan McBride.

Fierce Biotech, a biotechnology industry publication, reports on scientific research into the effects of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD, highlighting the new therapy as a promising alternative to traditional treatments.



December 6, 2012


  Reality Sandwich "The State of Psychedelic Research: A Talk with Rick Doblin" by Ido Hartogsohn.

Reality Sandwich contributor Ido Hartogsohn shares a recent interview with MAPS Founder Rick Doblin, where he speaks about how he became interested in researching psychedelics, how he believes MDMA research will pan out, how MAPS is participating in harm reduction, and much more.



December 5, 2012


  The Raw Story "Rape Victim: Ecstasy Treatment Helped Me Re-Integrate Trauma" by Eric W. Dolan.

The Raw Story covers Rachel Hope’s participation in our study of Treating PTSD with MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy, which provided her a long-lasting reduction to her PTSD symptoms. “I kept getting better.”


  Gimby "“Bath Salts” Show Promise as PTSD Treatment, Researchers Say" by Trish Anderton.

Gimby highlights our research into psychedelic drugs in an article about how research into controversial drugs may provide hope for people suffering from PTSD.


  Reuters "Researchers Say Form of Ecstasy May Heal Combat Trauma" by Harriet McLeod.

Reuters summarizes how scientific research into the medical potential of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can help people overcome treatment-resistant PTSD. The article includes insights from researchers, a PTSD expert, and a professor in psychiatry and neuroscience. “The taboos are lifting, and people are getting practical about science,” Dr. Michael Mithoefer said.


  CNN "Patient Talks About Ecstasy Treatment for PTSD"

Dr. Sanjay Gupta of CNN interviews Rachel Hope about her experience as a participant in our MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research. “I had all this access to my mind and I could control where I was thinking and going and look at things differently.”



December 4, 2012


  The Huffington Post "Just Say No to Drug War?" by Craig Comstock.

Craig Comstock writes for The Huffington Post about the war on drugs, citing that government-approved research into psychedelics is a step in the right direction.


  The Age "Dancing with Molly" by Eileen Ormsby.

The Age reports the state of MDMA research, highlighting our recent study focusing on treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. The article also details Psychedelic Research in Science and Medicine (PRISM) and their efforts to conduct similar research in Australia.


  CNN "Your Thoughts: Treating PTSD with Ecstasy" by Jacque Wilson.

After receiving over a thousand comments in response to their three-part series, CNN continues the discussion surrounding research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy by showcasing a selection of readers’ thoughts, reactions, comments, and opinions.

Read Part 1, Part 2, & Part 3 of the CNN article accompanying this video.

Watch the video.



December 3, 2012


  Jezebel "Ecstasy Could Help Survivors of Sexual Assault" by Tracie Egan Morrissey.

Jezebel writes about how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can help survivors of sexual assault overcome treatment-resistant posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).


  Policymic "PTSD Treatment: Ecstasy Can Help Solve the PTSD Epidemic in America" by Lilly O'Donnell.

Policymic shares promising results from research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy that may provide hope for people suffering from treatment-resistant PTSD.


  Global Post "Ecstasy Used to Treat PTSD Patients Sees Success" by Alexander Besant.

Global Post explores the results and presents the facts from research into treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy.


  CNN "Treating PTSD with Ecstasy: One Story" by Caleb Hellerman.

CNN completes their three-part series on MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD by analyzing facts surrounding both PTSD and MDMA, in addition to detailing Rachel Hope’s experience during and after receiving the therapy.

Read Part 1 & Part 2.

Watch the video.



December 2, 2012


  Psychology Today "Can Ecstasy Help Treat PTSD?" by Romeo Vitelli.

Psychology Today offers an interpretation of our results into research focusing on treating PTSD in veterans, victims of sexual assault, first responders, and more. The experimental treatment uses MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a tool to help people overcome PTSD.


  CNN "Ecstasy to Treat PTSD: One Woman’s Story" by Caleb Hellerman.

CNN continues with the second installment of their three-part series covering our MDMA research and further profiles Rachel Hope, a participant in an MDMA-assisted psychotherapy study who was able to overcome PTSD as a result. The article details how MDMA was originally created and how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research came to be a reality.

Read Part 1 & Part 3.

Watch the video.



December 1, 2012


  CNN "Experimental Treatment for PTSD: Ecstasy" by Caleb Hellerman.

CNN begins their three-part series focusing on treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy by offering an extensive overview of the research. Rachel Hope, a woman who previously suffered from PTSD, received the treatment in 2005 and shares thoughts about her experience.

Read Part 2 & Part 3.

Watch the video.


  The Daily Mail "Doctors Offer Hope for PTSD Patients - By Treating Them with Ecstasy"

The Daily Mail covers our recent research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD, providing many details and statistics about the study.



November 30, 2012


  CNN "Dr. Sanjay Gupta: Ecstasy as PTSD Treatment?" by Dr. Sanjay Gupta.

CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta reports on our research on MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a PTSD treatment, featuring interviews with researchers, participants, and military experts.

Read Part 1, Part 2, & Part 3 of the CNN article accompanying this video.



November 28, 2012


  The Raw Story "Researcher Rick Doblin Optimistic About Future of Psychedelic Drugs" by Eric W. Dolan.

The Raw Story examines statements made by MAPS Founder Rick Doblin, Ph.D., from a video podcast hosted by Alexander Ward. Doblin speaks about creating MAPS, researching MDMA, his ibogaine experience, and how psychedelics may hold hope for the future of medicine.

Watch Rick Doblin explain how MAPS researches MDMA, in addition to details about his experience with the drug ibogaine.



November 27, 2012


  NBC Los Angeles "Party Drug May Help Tough Cases of PTSD, Researchers Say" by Tony Shin and R. Stickney.

NBC Los Angeles provides news about recent research results from a long-term follow up study focusing on MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment method for people suffering from PTSD.

Correction: The military is not yet testing MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, but we are in conversations with some armed forces treatment providers with hopes of increasing support.

Watch television coverage from NBC Los Angeles and NBC San Diego.


  News.com.au "Ecstasy Used to Treat War Veterans in New Research" by Daniel Piotrowski.

News.com.au provides an overview of MAPS’ recent research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD, in addition to covering upcoming research efforts from our Australia-based non-profit colleagues, PRISM (Psychedelic Research in Science and Medicine).


  NBC San Diego "Scientists to Test Ecstasy for PTSD Vets" by Tony Shin.

NBC San Diego provides coverage of our MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research with a TV news report detailing how the new treatment can help people suffering from PTSD.


  Alt-Daily "Health, Medicine, and Psychedelics: The Potential for Change" by Riazul Islam.

MAPS Intern Riazul Islam writes for AltDaily.com about scientific research into the medical potential of LSD, MDMA, and psilocybin, providing a glimpse into new treatments for PTSD, anxiety, and more.


  NBC Los Angeles "Company Says Ecstasy Helps Post Traumatic Stress Disorder" by John Cádiz Klemack.

NBC Los Angeles covers MDMA-assisted psychotherapy on live television, educating the greater Los Angeles area with facts surrounding how the treatment can help people overcome PTSD.



November 26, 2012


  Salem News "PTSD and TBI Therapy: Marijuana Vs. Ecstasy… Marijuana Wins Hands Down" by Dr. Phillip Leveque.

Salem News writes about the use of medical marijuana and MDMA as treatments for PTSD. Noting recent research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment method for PTSD, an optimistic outlook for the future of medicine if projected.



November 24, 2012


  Loop 21 "MDMA (Ecstacy) May Help Treat PTSD" by Dion Rabouin.

Loop21 touches upon promising results from MAPS’ recent research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD.


  Alexander Ward "Rick Doblin - The Ibogaine Experience"

Rick Doblin speaks with Alexander Ward at length about his experience with ibogaine, providing very detailed insights about how the drug can affect people.

Watch the video.



November 23, 2012


  Care2 "PTSD Sufferers See Long-Term Benefits From MDMA-Assisted Therapy" by Beth Buczynski.

Care2 reviews the recently published results of our research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy with facts, infographics, and quotes.



November 22, 2012


  The Independent "Ecstasy Helps Post-traumatic Stress" by Jeremy Laurance.

The Independent covers recent research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD, citing long-term follow-up results that show the treatment’s benefits were maintained an average of 3 years later.


  The Times of India "Ecstasy Fights Post-Traumatic Stress"

The Times of India reports on research aiming to help people suffering from PTSD. The study used MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment method for overcoming PTSD, and the results are promising.


  Mancunian Matters "Dr. Ben Sessa Responds to U.K. Psychologists Not “Convinced” by Scientific Research"

In response to an article criticizing our recent research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, Dr. Ben Sessa offers his comments on the article, providing detailed rebuttals to unfounded claims made by Mancunian Matters.



November 21, 2012


  Alternet "Research Points to Clear Benefits of MDMA for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder" by Craig K Comstock.

Alternet describes the results of MAPS’ long-term follow-up research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, highlighting that the 16 participants maintained improvements an average of 45 months after treatment.


  Medical Xpress "Follow-Up Study Finds Lasting Benefit From MDMA for People with PTSD" by Bob Yirka.

Medical Xpress writes about the medical potential of research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy.


  The Psychiatric Times "From Bath Salts to Spice and Beyond—Elucidating Emerging Drugs of Abuse" by Heidi Anne Duerr, MPH.

The Psychiatric Times reviews Andrew Penn’s 2012 US Psychiatric & Mental Health Congress talk in which he educated the audience about a variety of drugs, including research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD. He highlighted that 83% of participants maintained improvements in PTSD an average of 3 years later.


  The Daily Beast "E Meets PTSD" by Andrew Sullivan.

Andrew Sullivan writes for The Daily Beast about how scientific research into psychedelic drugs, such as studying MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD, is diminishing the stigma surrounding psychedelics.


  The Week "Can Ecstasy Help Veterans Fight Off Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder?"

The Week provides an extensive overview of how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research is conducted, concluding with results that may give PTSD patients hope for the future of medical treatments.



November 20, 2012


  The Raw Story "Ecstasy-Assisted Psychotherapy Shows Promising Results for PTSD" by Eric W. Dolan.

The Raw Story goes into great detail about research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD, detailing everything from the “therapeutic alliance” between the therapists and participant, to sharing encouraging results that show promise for future medical advancements.


  Gather "Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Treatment: Party Drug Ecstasy?" by Renee Nal.

Gather responds to MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research results by offering some staggering statistics about how much of our population currently suffers from PTSD without hope for a working treatment.


  The Fix "Can Ecstasy Help Treat PTSD?" by McCarton Ackerman.

The Fix shares recent results published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology that indicate MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can successfully help people overcome PTSD.


  Stars and Stripes "Ecstasy Effective in Treatment of Lingering PTSD, New Study Finds" by Matthew M. Burke.

Stars and Stripes offers a recap of results from our long-term follow-up research into treating posttraumatic stress disorder with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. The article also highlights our initiative to research medical marijuana as a treatment method for people suffering from PTSD.


  Nature "MDMA Keeps Severe Stress at Bay" by Arran Frood.

Medical and psychedelics experts speak about the promising results from our research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy.


  ZME Science "Ecstasy Shows More Promise in Post Traumatic Stress" by Mihai Andrei.

In response to recent research results, ZME Science educates their audience about the benefits of treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy.


  Z6 Mag "PTSD Veterans May Have Hope with MDMA, or Ecstasy" by Neva Happel.

Z6 Mag posts a lot of information and videos revolving around our research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, ranging from CNN interviews, to the lead psychotherapist speaking at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs.


  Military.com "PTSD Study Findings Reinforce Case for Ecstasy" by Bryant Jordan.

Military.com reports on the implications of our research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for veterans with PTSD. “Completing the studies necessary to make this treatment available will require increasing financial and political support from both within and outside the military,” said Brad Burge of MAPS. “We provide men and women in the armed forces with the most advanced tools of war. It’s time we gave them the most advanced tools of healing, too.”


  Health-News-Watch "Ecstasy May Help Treat PTSD" by Suzy Mage.

Health-News-Watch provides a detailed, scientific explanation of how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can people overcome PTSD.


  DrugFree.org "Ecstasy May Help Treat Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder" by Join Together Staff .

The Partnership at DrugFree.org offers a report on recent medical research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, educating their supporters and new readers with unbiased science news.


  Reason "New Study Confirms MDMA’s Effectiveness in Psychotherapy" by Jacob Sullum.

Reason.com covers the recent publication of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research results in the Journal of Psychopharmacology.


  PR Newswire "Landmark Study Shows Long-Term Benefits of MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy for PTSD Sufferers" by MAPS.

People suffering from chronic, treatment-resistant posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) experienced lasting benefits from MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, according to a new long-term follow-up study published online November 20 in the Journal of Psychopharmacology.

Download the official press release (PDF).



November 19, 2012


  The New York Times "A ‘Party Drug’ May Help the Brain Cope With Trauma" by Benedict Carey.

The New York Times announces today’s publication of the paper describing the results of our long-term follow-up study, showing that MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can have lasting benefits for people suffering from PTSD. The results were published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, indicating that 83% of participants did not qualify for PTSD two months after treatment, and on average, improvements were maintained an average of 3.8 years later.



November 9, 2012


  Yale Daily News "Jim Fadiman: Researcher in the Sky with Diamonds" by Karolina Ksiazek.

The Yale Daily News interviews Dr. James Fadiman, Ph.D., author of The Psychedelic Explorer’s Guide, about his experience researching LSD, how psychedelic drugs influenced social movements in the 1960’s, and the prospective future of prescription psychedelics.



November 4, 2012


  The Gazette "Yes on 64 is Help for PTSD Patients" by Bob Wiley.

The Gazette reports on requests from Colorado veterans suffering from PTSD to have access to medical marijuana. Amendment 64, which passed on November 6, now allows the legal use of marijuana statewide.


  Truthout "Medical Marijuana: Obama Administration Continues Reefer Madness" by Robert Wilbur.

In response to the 2012 election, Truthout provides a full overview of state initiatives with the goal of changing medical marijuana policy. Opponents of medical marijuana suggest that more marijuana research should be conducted before making it more widely available, though the article details how some government agencies (like NIDA) are making scientific research almost impossible to accomplish.



November 3, 2012


  The Vancouver Sun "Ancient Traditions Get New Life" by Ian Mulgrew.

The Spirit Plant Medicine Conference gathered scientists, scholars, and shamans to present and discuss the latest research results into naturally occurring psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, ayahuasca, and ibogaine.



November 2, 2012


  Aeon Magazine "Erik Davis - On Psychedelics" by Erik Davis.

Erik Davis writes for Aeon Magazine about progression in the field of medicine as a result of the current wave of psychedelic research. Scientists contributing to research have developed potential treatments for a variety of medical conditions, including cancer, anxiety, and depression.



November 1, 2012


  The Huffington Post "Obama, What About “Free and Open Scientific Inquiry” for Medical Marijuana?" by Dr. John Schwarz.

Dr. John Schwarz writes for The Huffington Post Blog about how medical marijuana is still excluded from research despite President Obama’s memorandum that science would guide federal policy decisions. Dr. Sue Sisley received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to conduct research into marijuana as a treatment for veterans suffering from PTSD, but the study was blocked when the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) refused to sell the marijuana necessary to conduct the study.



October 23, 2012


  Reality Sandwich "Modern Psychedelic Research" by David Wilder.

Research from around the world suggests psychedelic drugs can provide medical benefits for a variety of conditions, ranging from PTSD to cluster headaches. Highlighting studies from MAPS, the Beckley Foundation, and various academic institutions, this article is a comprehensive look into the current state of psychedelic research.



October 20, 2012


  Santa Cruz Patch "Psychedelic Drug Research Renaissance: A Comprehensive Review" by David Jay Brown.

Psychedelic Drug Research Renaissance: A Comprehensive Review, is a new book by author David Jay Brown that summarizes 22 years of clinical research into the medical potential of psychedelics. Drugs such as LSD, MDMA, psilocybin, ayahuasca, and more have been shown to have medical benefits, and this book is a very detailed resource for these substances and their capability to heal.



October 19, 2012


  The Boston Globe "Law, Policy Thwart Research on Marijuana" by Chelsea Conaboy.

Massachusetts voters prepare to vote on whether to allow medical marijuana for people suffering from PTSD, chronic pain, HIV/AIDS, leukemia, and other illnesses, while a lack of adequately controlled scientific studies is fueling disagreements between patients and policymakers over its safety and effectiveness. Meanwhile, the National Institute on Drug Abuse continues to block MAPS’ planned, FDA-approved study of marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in U.S. veterans.



October 18, 2012


  Reality Sandwich "A Report from Psychedemia, 2012: Integrating Psychedelics and Academics" by VerDarLuz.

Reality Sandwich reports on Psychedemia, a conference focusing on integrating psychedelics and academics taking place September 27-30. The recap includes details about discussion panels that focused on scientific research into psilocybin, salvia, and more.



October 17, 2012


  Reality Sandwich "This Week in Psychedelics" by Neşe Devenot.

Reality Sandwich compiles a list of recent news surrounding psychedelics, including stories about psychedelic conferences, MDMA research, Eastern philosophy, and more.



October 14, 2012


  Stichting Open "ICPR 2012 Draws Attention to Psychedelic Research"

The second annual Interdisciplinary Conference on Psychedelic Research is an event highlighting scientific studies into psychedelic drugs such as LSD, MDMA, and psilocybin. Stichting Open recently held the event in Amsterdam, and MAPS Clinical Research Specialist, Ilsa Jerome, Ph.D., gave a presentation about research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy and the exciting results that have followed.


  Santa Fe New Mexican "Cannabis Catch-22: PTSD Patients Could be Dropped from State’s Medical Program" by Deborah Busemeyer.

The Santa Fe New Mexican covers the controversy following New Mexico’s potential decision to no longer allow PTSD patients to legally use medical marijuana to treat their symptoms. The article goes into great detail about past and upcoming medical marijuana research while explaining the political situation surrounding the drug and PTSD patients in the state.



October 11, 2012


  The Telegraph "Letters: Effects of Ecstasy and Clinical MDMA" by Ben Sessa, M.D..

Psychiatrist Ben Sessa, M.D., writes to The Telegraph to discuss the contributions made by Professor Andy Parrott about MDMA research on UK Channel 4’s “Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial.” For Dr. Sessa, there is already ample scientific evidence that the benefits of pure MDMA in controlled settings for therapeutic purposes outweighs the risks.



October 4, 2012


  The Register-Guard "Guest Viewpoint: Marijuana Should Be Allowed as PTSD Therapy" by Alan Cohn and Brian Michaels.

The Register-Guard writes about how the politics surrounding medical marijuana affect people living in Oregon and veterans suffering from PTSD. The article provides hope for the future of medical marijuana by mentioning MAPS’ marijuana research initiatives and lawsuit against the DEA.



October 3, 2012


  The Neuroethics Blog "The Army’s on Ecstasy: Marching Toward an Ethical Drug Policy" by J. Kohn.

The Neuroethics Blog shows how developing MDMA-assisted psychotherapy into a legal treatment for service men and women with PTSD goes hand in hand with creating ethical drug policies.


  Daily Nexus "MDMA T.V. Show Sparks Controversy, Yet ‘Taboo’ Research Holds Potential to Help" by Michael Roe.

The Daily Nexus writes about recent MDMA research that aired on a Channel 4 documentary in the United Kingdom. The article suggests that even though psychedelic drugs have a taboo surrounding them at times, scientific research into the medical benefits of these substances provides hope for our society.



October 2, 2012


  Philly.com "Far Out: A Psychedelic Gathering at Penn" by Jason Nark.

Philly.com reviews Psychedemia, a conference aiming to integrate psychedelics with academics. The article highlights speaker Julie Holland and her talk about how marijuana and MDMA can alleviate symptoms of PTSD.



September 27, 2012


  Vice "Conclusive Proof: Britain Loves Ecstasy" by Gavin Haynes .

Vice writes about the success of Drugs Live, a documentary program showcasing MDMA research that was sponsored by United Kingdom television station Channel 4. Conducted by Professor David Nutt and Val Curran, the research focused on brain scans of over 20 volunteers that were situated in an fMRI machine. Nutt is using the research results to make a case for treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy.


  Big Think "Ecstasy Research Looks to Help Those Affected by PTSD" by Orion Jones.

Big Think presents MDMA research as one of their daily “big ideas.” The short piece focuses on Professor David Nutt’s research and features information about how MDMA could treat PTSD.


  Imperial College "Researchers Discuss MDMA Science"

Dr. Robin Carhart-Harris and Dr. David Erritzoe of Imperial College detail their research into MDMA using brain-imaging technology and explain why research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD and other mental illnesses may be beneficial.


  The Telegraph "Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial, Channel 4, Review" by Helen Brown.

The Telegraph reviews the new MDMA research documentary “Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial” and its success in providing a scientific approach that does not glamorize drug use. The research aimed to measure brain activity in volunteers using fMRI machines, in addition to studying the potential of treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy.  The study was funded by United Kingdom television station Channel 4 and conducted by Professors David Nutt and Val Curran.



September 26, 2012


  Channel 4 "Q and A: What is MDMA?"

In response to airing Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial, an MDMA research documentary, Channel 4 provides a summary of MDMA and all of its components. The article highlights the medical potential of the drug, citing the intention of treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy.


  The Fix "Live TV MDMA Study Airs in the UK" by May Wilkerson.

The Fix summarizes Drugs Live: The Ectsasy Trial, a documentary highlighting MDMA research that was sponsored by UK television station Channel 4. The research used fMRI machines to study resting brain activity after taking MDMA and was conducted by Professors David Nutt and Val Curran.


  The Guardian "MDMA May Help Treat Depression and PTSD, Channel 4 Study Suggests" by Amanda Feilding.

Amanda Feilding, founder of The Beckley Foundation, writes for The Guardian about how recent research results indicate that MDMA may work as an alternative treatment method for depression and PTSD. Feilding’s article coincides with the launch of the MDMA research documentary, Drugs Live, which featured research conducted by Professor David Nutt.


  The Guardian "Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial – The Highs and Lows" by Ian Sample.

The Guardian examines Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial, an MDMA research documentary funded by Channel 4. Conducted by Professors David Nutt and Val Curran, the research focused on resting brain activity from over 20 healthy volunteers while under the effects of MDMA. Featuring a live discussion from a variety of participants, the program covered both positive and negative aspects of the drug.



September 25, 2012


  The Telegraph "Can LSD Cure Depression?" by Jerome Burne.

The Telegraph writes an in-depth article about the increasing merits of psychedelic research. Citing research conducted by organizations such as MAPS and The Beckley Foundation, the article makes a strong case for the potential of psychedelics as alternative treatment methods for ailments such as depression, cluster headaches, and PTSD.



September 24, 2012


  New Statesman "Not Raving but Drowning - Could MDMA Help Therapy?" by Michael Brooks.

The New Statesman writes about public perception of MDMA and how scientific research is providing an alternative, objective narrative that squanders untrue claims about the drug. Highlighting MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, the article suggests, “People who would benefit from this therapy are not raving, but drowning. It wouldn’t hurt anyone to throw them a lifeline.”



September 22, 2012


  Daily Mail "Author of We Need to Talk About Kevin on Taking Drugs for Controversial Channel 4 Show" by Lionel Shriver.

Author Lionel Shriver provides a wonderfully detailed report of her experience as a volunteer for Professor David Nutt’s MDMA research being funded by Channel 4. The research was filmed and will be presented on Sept. 26 and 27, 2012 on Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial.


  The Sun "The Agony and the Ecstasy" by Leigh Holmwood.

The Sun writes about Phil Campion, a former Special Air Services member who volunteered to take part in Professor David Nutt’s MDMA research. As a veteran, Campion has seen other veterans suffering from PTSD, which is what spawned his decision to volunteer. Nutt’s research focuses on resting brain activity, though seeing how MDMA could help treat PTSD is also one of the study’s goals.



September 21, 2012


  PR Web "Second International Psychedelic Science Conference Shares Leading Research Results" by MAPS.

At Psychedelic Science 2013, the world’s leading psychedelic research institutes will gather researchers, therapists, students, and the intellectually curious over five days to share the latest research on MDMA, LSD, psilocybin, ayahuasca, ibogaine, and more. The event will feature pre- and post-conference workshops, lectures, discussions, a sunset cruise over the San Francisco Bay, live performances, and much more!

Download the official press release (PDF).


  Daily Mail "A Vicar, a Pop Star’s Dad and an Ex-MP All Taking Drugs on Live TV" by Zoe Brennan.

The Daily Mail highlights a variety of prominent figures and their involvement in new MDMA research being funded by Channel 4. Most notably, the article focuses on a three of the research volunteers and their thoughts, such as author Lionel Shriver, former MP Evan Harris, and actor Keith Allen.


  The Guardian "David Nutt and Julia Manning: is It Right to Take Ecstasy in a TV Trial?" by Oliver Laughland.

The Guardian’s Oliver Laughland interviews researcher David Nutt and health campaigner Julia Manning about Channel 4’s decision to fund and broadcast research on MDMA, and their discussion ranges from neuroscience to morality.



September 20, 2012


  FactMag "Keith Allen and Lionel Shriver to Take MDMA in Live Televised Drug Trial on Channel 4"

FactMag writes about a new MDMA research that will be presented in an upcoming documentary titled Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial. The study was funded by Channel 4 and conducted by Professor David Nutt, with the purpose to see how MDMA affects resting brains.


  New Scientist "MDMA TV: Turn on, Tune in, Do the Research" by Graham Lawton.

Graham Lawton discusses the controversy over Channel 4’s decision to broadcast MDMA research conducted by Professor David Nutt.  Lawton was a volunteer in the study and suggests that more debates about MDMA’s place in science are necessary.



September 19, 2012


  BBC News "Evan Harris, Former Lib Dem MP, Takes Ecstasy on TV for Medical Research"

BBC News writes about Evan Harris, former Member of Parliament, and his decision to volunteer for Professor David Nutt’s research on MDMA’s affect on resting brains. The research was funded and filmed by Channel 4, in order to be presented in an upcoming special.


  Americans For Safe Access "Cannabis, the Gateway Herb: A Doctor Responds" by Michelle Sexton.

Michelle Sexton of Americans For Safe Access writes about the current state of marijuana in order to present a medical professional’s perspectives on research and the drug’s classification as Schedule I. The article highlights MAPS’ efforts to conduct research on smoked and/or vaporized marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in veterans of war.


  Digital Journal "UK to Televise Live MDMA Drug Experiment Sept. 26" by David Silverberg.

Digital Journal writes about Professors Val Curran and David Nutt’s MDMA research that was funded by Channel 4. The scientific study will air alongside a debate on Sept. 26 and 27, 2012, on a program titled Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial.



September 18, 2012


  Belfast Telegraph "Former MP Evan Harris Takes Ecstasy for Channel 4 Show" by Sherna Noah.

The Belfast Telegraph reveals the identities of MDMA research participants in a new story about an upcoming televised study. The research used fMRI machines to analyze activity in resting brains and was funded by Channel 4. Professors David Nutt and Val Curran led the research and are hopeful that their study leads the way for more studies into the therapeutic use of MDMA, such as the treatment of PTSD.


  The Huffington Post "Evan Harris, Former MP, To Take Class A Drugs On TV ‘To See If MDMA Can Cure Depression’" by Dina Rickman.

The United Kingdom Huffington Post writes about Professor David Nutt’s new research aiming to see if MDMA can cure depression. The article highlights Evan Harris, a former Member of Parliament,  who is just one of 26 diverse subjects in Nutt’s study. The research was funded by Channel 4, which allowed the research to be filmed to be presented in the upcoming special, Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial


  io9 "Did You Just Take a Vitamin C Tablet, or a Hit of Ecstasy?" by Robert T. Gonzalez.

io9 writes about the Channel 4-funded MDMA study being conducted by Professor David Nutt. The article highlights statements made by Graham Lawton, a reporter who volunteered to be a part of the research.


  The Stranger "This Is Your Brain on Drugs: An fMRI Scan While High on Ecstasy" by Brendan Kiley.

The Stranger writes about New Scientist reporter Graham Lawton, and his experience volunteering for Professor David Nutt’s scientific study on the effect of MDMA on resting brains. The study was filmed and will air on Channel 4 in a special titled Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial.The Stranger writes about New Scientist reporter Graham Lawton, and his experience volunteering for Professor David Nutt’s scientific study on the effect of MDMA on resting brains. The study was filmed and will air on Channel 4 in a special titled Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial.



September 17, 2012


  Medical Daily "Could MDMA Be the Cure for PTSD and Depression?" by Makini Brice.

Medical Daily educates their readers about the history of MDMA and its use in psychiatry. Citing Donna Kilgore’s successful MDMA psychotherapy with Michael Mithoefer, the article advocates for more research to be done on MDMA before it can be used widely in therapy. The article mentions current research on the effects of MDMA in resting brains, in addition to efforts to treat PTSD.



September 15, 2012


  The Guardian "Can MDMA Help to Cure Depression?" by Conal Urquhart.

The Guardian dives into the history of MDMA research,  focusing on David Nutt and Val Curran’s new study funded by Channel 4,  a United Kingdom television station. The new research used fMRI machines to measure brain activity and was filmed to be shown alongside a debate on Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial,  an upcoming Channel 4 special. MAPS’ phase 2 pilot study using MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat war veterans suffering from PTSD is also highlighted. 

Professor Andy Parrott is quoted in the article as an opponent of the televised research. His argument suggests that honest drug education should not be considered as a way to protect kids from the drug,  but blocking scientific research into therapeutic applications is a viable alternative. Parrott suggests that subjects may seek out the drug for self-medication purposes after the experiments,  though our research suggests otherwise. Our long-term follow-up of subjects from our initial proof-of-principle study showed that only 1 of 20 subjects tried MDMA after the experiment, after which the subject reported that it was the therapeutic support and not just the MDMA that made their experience in our experiment so productive, and that she did not intend to use MDMA outside of a clinical context again.



September 13, 2012


  Psychotherapy Networker "Old Pills, New Promises for PTSD" by Jared DeFife.

Psychotherapy Networker writes about the current state of PTSD treatments and the potential of treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. Detailing research conducted by MAPS, the article highlights MDMA as having significant potential for PTSD treatment.



August 31, 2012


  Santa Cruz Patch "Can Psychedelic Drugs Help Us to Die Gratefully?" by David Jay Brown.

Author David Jay Brown writes for the Santa Cruz Patch about research into LSD and psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy as treatment methods for anxiety in people with life-threatening illnesses. Brown examines current and past psychedelic research, making a strong case for these studies to continue helping people.



August 26, 2012


  ABC 15 Arizona "Hear Me Out: Does Research Provide Solid Evidence of Medical Marijuana’s Benefits?"

In this feature, Dr. Sue Sisley of Arizona is given the opportunity to explain how obstructive federal regulations are creating enormous barriers to new medical marijuana research.



August 24, 2012


  London Evening Standard "Are They Raving Mad?" by Richard Godwin.

Channel 4, a United Kingdom television station, has funded the U.K.‘s latest MDMA research. The scientific study, led by Professor David Nutt, was a neurological analysis of the effects of MDMA on the resting brain. The research was filmed and the results will debut on Channel 4’s upcoming special, Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial.


  Psychology Today "Psilocybin and Personality" by Scott A. McGreal, MSc.

A new article from Psychology Today examines results from multiple psilocybin studies and suggests that personality may influence the effects of psilocybin.



August 22, 2012


  The Huffington Post "Straight Trippin’" by Gabriel Mizrahi.

Gabriel Mizrahi writes for The Huffington Post about how MAPS and other institutions are conducting research into psychedelics as new treatment options for PTSD, obsessive-compulsive disorder, alcohol dependency, and more.



August 16, 2012


  Reality Sandwich "Psychiatric Power and Taboo in Modern Psychedelia" by Patrick Roseman Dunn.

Reality Sandwich writes about the cultural taboo surrounding psychedelics and how research into drugs like LSD, psilocybin, and MDMA is changing public perception of them. The article explains the vast difference in psychedelic experiments done by Timothy Leary in the 1960s and current psychedelic research being conducted within established scientific protocol by MAPS and other institutions.



August 14, 2012


  ICEERS "Ritual Users of Ayahuasca: A Longitudinal Study"

The International Center for Ethnobotanical Education, Research & Service (ICEERS) writes a press release announcing the results of a recently published ayahuasca study. The research focused on several aspects of mental health in 127 regular ayahuasca users who used ayahuasca twice a month over the course of at least 15 years. The ayahuasca users were compared to 115 non-users, and the tests were conducted again one year later. The study found no adverse psychiatric or neuropsychological effects of long-term ayahuasca users.



August 11, 2012


  Psychology Today "High Time to Destigmatize Psychedelics" by Jonathan D. Moreno, Ph.D .

Jonathan D. Moreno writes for Psychology Today about the history of psychedelic research and therapy in hopes to change public perception of drugs such as LSD, MDMA, and psilocybin. The article highlights current psychedelic research conducted by MAPS, as well mentioning Psychedemia, an upcoming conference focusing on psychedelics and the culture surrounding them.



August 10, 2012


  AZ Family "Medical Marijuana Research Shackled by Politics?" by Sybil Hoffman.

AZ Family describes Arizona’s current struggle with medical marijuana due to political obstacles. The public of Arizona petitioned the Department of Health Services to add PTSD, migraines, anxiety, and depression to the list of eligible conditions for medical marijuana, but all of the proposals were turned down due to lack of research. Dr. Sue Sisley of Arizona observes, “I don’t know any members of the public that are satisfied with the fact that science is being shackled by politics.”



August 7, 2012


  Boom Festival 2012 Newspaper "Kosmicare"

An international team of volunteers ranging from psychiatrists to medical writers provided psychedelic harm reduction services at the Kosmicare tent at Boom Festival 2012. MAPS has supported psychedelic emergency services at Boom since 2002, and this year Kosmicare is a collaboration between Boom, MAPS, and government agencies. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin, Ph.D., shares his experience with Kosmicare and other psychedelic harm reduction initiatives.

Download the Final Drug Checking Report (PDF) from Boom Festival 2012, containing extensive information about the types and purity levels of drugs tested during the festival.



August 3, 2012


  The Conversation "Human Testing of Illicit Drugs – The Highs and Lows" by MacDonald Christie.

The Conversation reports on past and current research that tests the effects of drugs such as LSD, MDMA, psilocybin, and marijuana on human subjects. Recent research coincides with research from the 1960s, suggesting that psychedelics may offer therapeutic benefit for psychiatric disorders.



July 26, 2012


  Santa Cruz Patch "Can Psychedelic Drugs Enhance Creativity?" by David Jay Brown.

Author David Jay Brown explores how psychedelic drugs such as LSD, psilocybin, and mescaline can significantly enhance creativity. Citing previous psychedelic research studies, he makes a compelling argument that psychedelics and their relationship with creativity is something that should be researched in a serious capacity.


  The Morning News "The Heretic" by Tim Doody.

The Morning News profiles psychedelic researcher Dr. James Fadiman, featuring his thoughts on current, past, and future psychedelic studies. In addition to covering Fadiman’s LSD research focusing on creativity, the article also goes into detail about alternative therapeutic uses for LSD.



July 25, 2012


  Reality Sandwich "Psychedemia: Integrating Psychedelics into Academia" by Neşe Lisa Şenol.

Reality Sandwich details Psychedemia, a new interdisciplinary conference placing its focus on psychedelic science,  culture, and art. Psychedemia will be held in Philadelphia on September 27-30, featuring lectures, workshops, performances, art galleries, and more. MAPS will be co-sponsoring the event.



July 21, 2012


  The Lancet "Shaping the Renaissance of Psychedelic Research" by Ben Sessa.

Ben Sessa writes for The Lancet about the current state of psychedelic research.



July 20, 2012


  Care2 "Televised Drug Experiment Will Include a Vicar, an Actor and an Author" by Sarah Vrba.

Care2 writes about “Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial,” a new television special highlighting MDMA research. Channel 4 funded the new MDMA research, led by Professor Nutt and Professor Val Curran. The six-month study focused on resting brain activity in healthy volunteers. The research was filmed and will be presented alongside a live debate this Fall on Channel 4 in the United Kingdom.



July 19, 2012


  The Telegraph "Channel 4 to Screen Volunteers Taking the Drug Ecstasy" by Richard Alleyne.

A new MDMA research study is being funded by United Kingdom’s Channel 4 television station. The research, led by Professor David Nutt and Professor Val Curran, will use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure resting brain activity in volunteers. The six-month study was filmed and will be combined with a live debate to create Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial, airing on Channel 4.


  The Guardian "Scientists’ Agony Over Ecstasy" by David Nutt.

Professor David Nutt of Imperial College London writes for the Guardian about his current MDMA research project. With funding from Channel 4, a U.K. television station, and help from Professor Val Curran of University College London, Nutt has been able to measure resting brain activity in healthy volunteers after receiving a pure dose of MDMA. Channel 4 will air footage of the research along with a live debate about MDMA in two 60-minute installments of a special program titled Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial.


  Channel 4 "Groundbreaking MDMA Science Study to be Broadcast on Channel 4"

Channel 4, a United Kingdom television station, will be airing two 60-minute specials highlighting MDMA. The program, Drugs Live: The Ecstasy Trial, will show footage of a scientific study measuring MDMA’s effects on the resting brain, in addition to a live debate exploring all facets of the drug. The MDMA research is being funded by Channel 4 and will be led by psychopharmacologists Professor David Nutt of Imperial College London and Professor Val Curran of University College London.



July 12, 2012


  The Sacramento Bee "California Pot Research Backs Therapeutic Claims" by Peter Hecht.

The Sacramento Bee examines the recent completion of medical marijuana research conducted in California by the Center for Medical Cannabis Research (CMCR). The studies lasted over a decade and treated more than 300 patients, concluding that marijuana can offer benefits for treating pain from injuries, HIV, strokes, and other conditions. The article also highlights MAPS’ medical marijuana research plans.



July 11, 2012


  Death and Taxes "When Bobby Kennedy Defended LSD" by DJ Pangburn.

Death and Taxes recounts Senator Robert F. Kennedy’s statements in support of LSD during a hearing in 1966. Kennedy, whose wife had been treated with LSD, suggested that too much emphasis was placed on potential danger instead of how LSD could be “very helpful in our society if used properly.”



July 9, 2012


  HerbalGram (American Botanical Council) "Is CBD the Answer? Analyzing the Role of Cannabidiol in Medicinal Cannabis" by Lindsay Stafford Mader.

The official journal of the American Botanical Council sorts out the science behind the medical uses of cannabidiol (CBD, an active component of marijuana similar to THC and with different effects) and describes researchers’ efforts to understand the real risks and benefits of all components of the cannabis plant.


  Esquire "What If Es Really Are Good?" by Neil Boorman.

“If we were to invent a drug designed to treat PTSD, what qualities would it have?” asks MDMA researcher Ben Sessa, M.D. Neil Boorman of Esquire magazine describes his experience taking part in the UK’s first study of the effects of MDMA on the brain. Download the full article (pdf).



June 28, 2012


  The Guardian "Psychedelic Drugs Can Unlock Mysteries of Brain – Former Government Adviser" by Alok Jha.

The Guardian examines recent statements made by the United Kingdom’s former drug adviser, Professor David Nutt, concerning drug prohibition. Nutt suspects that the future of science and medicine will continue to be hindered if the UK upholds the current classification system of drugs, making it nearly impossible to do research on psychedelic drugs.



June 27, 2012


  Care2 "MDMA Turns 100 Years Old, Still Faces Stereotypes" by Beth Buczynski.

Care2 delves into the history of MDMA and its place in science and medicine. Brad Burge, MAPS’ Director of Communications, is interviewed and details MAPS’ research focusing on MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD. Burge also talks about the future of MDMA as a therapeutic drug.



June 26, 2012


  Lake Elsinore-Wildomar Patch "LSD Resurges 42 Years After Psychedelic 1960s" by Toni McAllister.

Lake Elsinore-Wildomar Patch reports on the LSD study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology in March 2012. The research indicates that LSD may be a viable option for the treatment of alcoholism. The article quotes MAPS researcher Peter Gasser, M.D., who recently completed a study of using LSD to treat anxiety in people suffering from life-threatening illnesses.



June 24, 2012


  The Chronicle of Philanthropy "$10-Million Bequest Shared by Groups Including Association for Psychedelic Studies" by Caroline Bermudez.

The Chronicle of Philanthropy details the $5 million bequest given to MAPS from software pioneer Ashawna Hailey. The bequest will go primarily towards research on using MDMA-assisted therapy to treat PTSD. Hailey was a board member of MAPS and cared deeply about drug policy reform, so she also left $1.25-million each to the American Civil Liberties Union, Drug Policy Alliance, Marijuana Policy Project, and Second Harvest Food Bank.



June 22, 2012


  Santa Cruz Patch "Psychedelic Drug Research Heralds the Future Science of Divinity" by David Jay Brown.

Writer David Jay Brown explores the connection between psychedelic drugs and religion, citing multiple psychedelic research studies. Brown expresses the idea that drugs such as LSD and psilocybin can create spiritual experiences that positively affect users of the drugs.



June 18, 2012


  Época "Doors Reopen for LSD"

Época summarizes the vast history of LSD. In the 1960’s, researchers studied the effects of LSD and its potential as a treatment for schizophrenia and depression. The article highlights researcher Timothy Leary’s life and his use with the drug, focusing on his LSD activism, which caught the attention of celebrities, the general public, and the government. Despite its prohibition, research on LSD has begun to take place once again. Research studies in various locations across the world have begun studying LSD-assisted therapy for end-of-life anxiety and depression.



June 16, 2012


  FYI Be Healthy "Magic Mushrooms Drug Shows Promise as Therapeutic Tool" by Brenda Goodman.

FYI Be Healthy sheds light on recent psilocybin research conducted by John Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. The article goes into great detail about how the study was conducted and shares the fascinating results of the study.



June 15, 2012


  National Post "Jesse Kline: Legalizing Ecstasy Would Save Lives" by Jesse Kline.

National Post details the current state of MDMA research, mentioning MDMA studies conducted by MAPS and providing a comprehensive insight into MDMA and its history in science and law.


  National Enquirer "Larry Hagman Mind Blowing LSD Trips" by Michael Glynn.

Famous actor Larry Hagman, known for his roles in I Dream of Jeannie and Dallas, has called LSD “the most illuminating experience” of his life.

Also see this letter from Larry Hagman about why he supports psychedelic research.



June 14, 2012


  NPR "Pure Ecstasy Is Safe, Canadian Doctor Says, But Don’t Buy ‘E’ On The Street" by Eliza Barclay.

NPR signifies recent statements about the safety of MDMA in clinical trials made by Dr. Perry Kendall, British Columbia’s chief health officer. Kendall’s stance suggests that the Canadian government’s attitude towards drug policy may be changing.


  AlterNet "Are We Finally Reawakening to the Profound Healing Properties of Psychedelics?" by Don Hazen.

AlterNet covers the wide variety of uses for psychedelics and marijuana, highlighting the various histories and medical potential of the drugs. The article features a transcript of the talks given at Reform Conference by MAPS Founder Rick Doblin Ph.D. and Executive Director of The Beckley Foundation, Amanda Feilding.


  The Canadian Press "Pure ecstasy can be ‘safe’ if consumed responsibly: B.C. health officer" by Tamsyn Burgmann.

The Canadian Press writes about statements made by British Columbia’s Chief Medical Officer of Health, Dr. Perry Kendall, concerning the safety of MDMA. Kendall suggests that the risks of MDMA are exaggerated and he would like to see government officials discuss potential changes to the current war on drugs.


  Scientific American "LSD May Cure Some Addicts" by Ian Chant.

Pål-Ørjan Johansen and Teri Krebs of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology analyzed six clinical trials of LSD that took place between 1966-1970. The results were published in The Journal of Psychopharmacology and explained that LSD can be an effective tool to treat addiction.


  The Star "B.C. Health Officer Stands by His Assertion That Pure Ecstasy Can be Safe for Adults" by Laura Stone.

British Columbia’s Chief Medical Officer of Health, Dr. Perry Kendall, is advocating for MDMA to be legalized and sold through government-regulated stores in Canada. Kendall says that the risks of MDMA are overblown, suggesting that psychedelic research from MAPS and others will provide better, safer drug policies.


  660 News "Top Doc in BC Says Ecstasy is Safe and Wants it Legalized" by Ian Campbell.

One of Canada’s top health officials, Dr. Perry Kendall, is speaking out in favor of drug policy reform in Canada, specifically regarding MDMA. He believes that MDMA should be made legal and available in licensed, government-run stores across Canada.



June 10, 2012


  The Guardian "Is The Future of Drugs Safe and Non-Addictive?" by David Nutt.

Psychopharmacologist David Nutt posits that extensive research into psychedelic drugs could benefit the medical world substantially. He suggests that synthetic versions of naturally occurring psychedelics can be created to have more predictable effects. Professor Nutt’s open stance on the subject of drug policy reform and medicine is one more example of the expanding legitimacy of psychedelic research.



June 6, 2012


  My Suburban Life "Psychedelic Studies" by Sara Smith.

The College of DuPage in Illinois is debuting a new class focusing on psychedelic research. Instructed by Bruce Sewick, “Psychedelic Mindview” will inform students about the history of psychedelic research, along with highlighting recent clinical studies using MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).


  Reality Sandwich "This Week in Psychedelics" by Neşe Lisa Şenol.

Reality Sandwich compiles a list of recent articles focusing on psychedelics, featuring news of the $5 million bequest to MAPS, new research focusing on ketamine, and an opinion piece on drug policy halting the progress of medicine.



June 4, 2012


  OHS Canada "Giving a Lift to Depression" by Danny Kucharsky.

Two recent studies of psilocybin from the Imperial College London in the UK suggest that psilocybin, the main active component in magic mushrooms, could be a useful treatment for depression. MAPS executive director Rick Doblin and other researchers comment on the implications of the new research for the future of mental health treatment.



June 3, 2012


  Care2 "Medical Marijuana Is Now Legal In Connecticut" by Beth Buczynski.

Care2 explores how Connecticut’s new medical marijuana law is at odds with the federal government’s continued unwillingness to allow research into its safety and effectiveness. While the DEA and NIDA continue to block MAPS’ FDA-approved study of marijuana for veterans with PTSD, over a third of the United States have taken matters into their own hands.



June 1, 2012


   "MAPS Shares Research Results with Doctors and Therapists at Veterans Administration and UCSF"

The promising results that MAPS is seeing in our ongoing MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD research program is getting unprecedented attention from the scientists, doctors, and psychotherapists most involved in finding effective treatments for PTSD.

On May 31, 2012, psychiatrist Michael Mithoefer, M.D., presented information about our initial studies of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD and our ongoing study in veterans with the staff at the National Center for PTSD at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration. On June 1, Dr. Mithoefer had the honor of presenting our promising research results at the San Francisco Veterans Administration Medical Center Mental Health Services’ Grand Rounds.

On the evening of May 31, MAPS hosted a tremendously successful free lecture and discussion at the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center. Psychiatrist Michael Mithoefer, M.D., and MAPS founder Rick Doblin, Ph.D., shared the most recent research results from our ongoing series of Phase 2 clinical studies of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD with over 200 attendees in a standing-room only lecture hall. We also announced the recent $5 million bequest from the estate of software pioneer Ashawna Hailey.



May 30, 2012


  PR Newswire "Software Pioneer Leaves $10 Million Bequest To Five Leading Health and Drug Policy Nonprofits" by MAPS.

This year, MAPS will benefit from a generous bequest of approximately $5 million from the estate of software pioneer Ashawna (Shawn) Hailey. This is the largest gift in MAPS’ 26-year history. The majority of Ashawna’s gift will be reserved for Phase 3 studies of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD, and allow MAPS to make a compelling case for donations of the remaining funds—about $10 million—for Phase 2 and 3.

Download the official press release (PDF).



May 29, 2012


  Philadelphia Daily News "In Philly, Keeping Tabs on LSD" by Jason Nark.

The Philadelphia Daily News juxtaposes current policies that criminalize psychedelics with the resurgence of academic and scientific interest in their therapeutic and spiritual uses. The upcoming Psychedemia conference at the University of Pennsylvania will explore the implications of recent research into the careful, beneficial uses of psychedelics for health and well-being.



May 24, 2012


  The Free Weekly "The Secret Truth About Psychedelic Medicines"

Northwest Arkansas’ alternative magazine The Free Weekly looks at the history of psychedelics in science, medicine, technology innovation, and spiritual practice. The cover article highlights research by MAPS and other organizations into psychedelics as tools for healing and scientific discovery.



May 22, 2012


  eBay Stories "Timothy Leary’s Isolation Tank" by Joe MacFarland.

eBay featured the MAPS auction of Timothy Leary’s sensory deprivation tank on eBay Stories, a blog that highlights “remarkable listings” found on the site. The floatation tank was given to Leary by John C. Lilly and it sold for $6,700, with all proceeds benefitting MAPS’ research.



May 18, 2012


  The Philly Post "Psychedelics Are the New Pot" by Nick Vadala.

The Philly Post explains how psychedelic drugs have recently become more embraced by science and pop culture. Awareness of psychedelics and psychedelic research is beginning to rise with an article on MDMA from Oprah’s magazine, a popular scene on Mad Men involving LSD, and comedians highlighting psychedelics during their sets.


  Psychedelic Press UK "Literary Review: ‘Spiritual Growth with Entheogens’ by Thomas B. Roberts (Ed)" by Psychedelic Press UK.

Psychedelic Press UK reviews Spiritual Growth with Entheogens, an edited volume by Thomas Roberts, Ph.D. (now available in the MAPS Store) exploring the history of psychedelics and their potential for self-help and spiritual awakenings. The book includes a chapter by MAPS founder Rick Doblin about his long-term follow-up study to Walter Pahnke’s famous Good Friday psilocybin Experiment.



May 16, 2012


  Radio Boston "Facing Death With Psychedelics" by Meara Sharma.

Radio Boston interviews Dr. John Halpern, a researcher at Harvard’s McLean Hospital exploring MDMA-assisted treatment to help people suffering from anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness.



May 10, 2012


  PR Newswire "U.S. Appeals Court To Hear Oral Arguments In Medical Marijuana Case Challenging DEA" by MAPS.

Official press release announcing the date for the May 11, 2012, oral arguments in Lyle E. Craker v. Drug Enforcement Administration in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit in Boston, Mass.


  Brain Blogger "A Trip for Terminal Patients" by Jennifer Gibson, PharmD.

Brain Blogger explores how patients may soon have more options for relieving the anxiety and stress that often comes with life-threatening illnesses. Researchers around the world working with MAPS and the Heffter Research Institute are finding ways to use psychedelics as part of a growing set of tools for treating end-of-life anxiety.



May 4, 2012


  The Washington Post "Medical Marijuana Meets Hostility from Obama Administration" by Rob Kampia.

Rob Kampia, executive director of the Marijuana Policy Project, explains in a Washington Post editorial how the Obama administration has repeatedly failed to uphold his campaign promises to respect medical marijuana and put science before drug war politics.



May 3, 2012


  The Daily Reveille (LSU) "The New Frontiersman: Hallucinogens Pave Way for Medical and Scientific Advancements" by Clayton Crockett.

The Louisiana State University student newspaper publishes an enthusiastic op-ed about how research into the beneficial uses of psychedelics, like the space race, offers a major opportunity for scientific advancement and insights into new methods of healing.



April 30, 2012


  io9 "Could A Single Pill Save Your Marriage?" by George Dvorsky.

Could pharmacologically-assisted therapy one day help people struggling with difficult relationships? This article explores a few areas currently being explored, and mentions past research on MDMA’s use in couples therapy.


  Politic365 "Can the Government Mix Drugs and Post-Combat Stress?" by Melissa Bynes Brooks.

This in-depth article from Politic365 explores the recent surge in psychedelic research, highlighting successful studies of MDMA, LSD, and psilocybin as treatments for various conditions.


  Indian Country Today Media Network "Ayahuasca May Hold Key to Breaking Addiction, But Canada Is Forcing Doctor to Stop Testing" by Kevin Taylor.

Dr. Gabor Maté is a Canadian physician who has been conducting MAPS-sponsored research on the therapeutic and spiritual use ayahuasca to help ease addiction. His work has come under fire recently from the Canadian government, but he and other scientists and patients continue insisting on the importance of finding more effective treatments for addiction and other patterns of dependence.



April 26, 2012


  AlterNet "5 Fascinating New Uses For Psychedelics" by Sarah Seltzer.

From alcoholism and PTSD to cluster headaches, anxiety, and depression, doctors and scientists are tuning in to the beneficial potential of psychedelics. AlterNet reports on the dramatic expansion of research in these compounds over the last ten years. The historical stigma on research into these tools is slowly but steadily evaporating.



April 24, 2012


  Death and Taxes "Psychedelic Drugs: Lighting the Way to Death Since Aldous Huxley’s Last Trip" by DJ Pangburn.

Death and Taxes points out that “it has taken nearly 50 years for the medical profession to catch up” with writer Aldous Huxley’s final LSD experience. Now, however, international researchers are discovering through careful scientific studies what Huxley seemed already to know: that psychedelic-assisted therapy could help ease people’s passage to death.


  Truthout "As FDA Loosens Stranglehold on Research, Studies Use Hallucinogens to Treat Psychiatric Illness" by Robert Wilbur.

Popular progressive media outlet Truthout reports on the worldwide surge in scientific interest in the therapeutic value of psychedelics, from LSD and MDMA to ketamine and psilocybin. The article takes a look at the most promising uses of psychedelic for conditions such as PTSD, anxiety associated with life-threatening illness, addiction, depression, and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), and explores the latest research into how these substances might work on the brain.


  Fox News "Doctors Consider Using Street Drugs to Ease Suffering of Dying Patients" by Dr. Keith Ablow.

Fox News comes out with a refreshingly sober article about the promise of psychedelic-assisted therapy for helping people overcome anxiety related to life-threatening illness. As psychiatrist Dr. Keith Ablow, a member of “the Fox News Medical A-Team,” cleverly points out, “Stigmatizing miraculous substances which we then relegate to the exclusive domain of drug pushers and addicts makes precisely zero sense. Let’s open our minds to the possibilities [sic] that many perilous drugs also hold much promise.”



April 20, 2012


  The New York Times "How Psychedelic Drugs Can Help Patients Face Death" by Lauren Slater.

A stirring article from the front page of The New York Times Magazine sheds light on how psychedelic-assisted therapy can help people with life-threatening illness overcome their anxiety and fear of death. Through real first-hand accounts of psychedelic therapy and earnest interviews with leading scientists from the Heffter Research Institute, MAPS, and other research centers from Harvard to Johns Hopkins, the article takes a comprehensive look at a fast-growing medical field that could bring hope to those who are dying.



April 18, 2012


  MSN Health "Use of Ecstasy, Speed by Teens Tied to Later Depression" by Alan Mozes.

Despite the headline, researchers involved in a recently completed study of high school students in Quebec caution that a direct, cause-and-effect line could not be found between recreational Ecstasy and amphetamine use and depression. South Carolina psychiatrist Dr. Michael Mithoefer, who is also leading MAPS’ ongoing study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for veterans with PTSD, acknowledges that the study raises interesting points. However, Mithoefer and other experts agree that the study fails to differentiate between those students whose drug use led to depression, and those students who seek out drugs because of other factors that do lead to depression, such as academic or social struggles or other substance use.



April 13, 2012


  BBC News "Can a Hallucinogen from Africa Cure Addiction?" by Stephanie Hegarty.

BBC News tells the story of Thillen Naidoo a South African man who found that ibogaine treatment helped him overcome his severe cocaine addiction. Increasing numbers of caregivers and patients worldwide are exploring the potential of ibogaine for addiction treatment, but the substance remains an illegal drug in most countries. In this article, experts in the UK discuss what it will take to make ibogaine and other psychedelics available as legitimate medicines for the people they could help most.



April 11, 2012


  The Massachusetts Daily Collegian "Committee Holds Hearings on Medical Marijuana Possibility" by Claire Anderson.

Voters in Massachusetts may soon have the chance to decide whether to make medical marijuana legally available in the state. MAPS is currently supporting a federal lawsuit by University of Massachusetts-Amherst professor Lyle Craker, Ph.D., against the DEA for denying him a license to grow marijuana for research. If Massachusetts voters approve medical marijuana and the federal government continues to block research into its safest and most effective uses, the gulf between the war on drugs and the needs of patients will become clearer than ever.


  The Daily Free Press "Students, Activists Present Argument for Cannabis at Suffolk University Symposium" by Alex Falco.

Boston University’s independent newspaper reports on a recent symposium hosted by NORML at Suffolk University on marijuana research. The symposium signals the increasing support for marijuana research and policy change among student groups at major universities. MAPS founder Rick Doblin, Ph.D., was among the many experts called in to address the politics, economics, and science of marijuana.



April 9, 2012


  Boston Herald "Pot’s High on Agenda" by Laurel J. Sweet.

Legislators in Massachusetts are considering a new initiative that would make medical marijuana legally available in the state. With the support of MAPS founder Rick Doblin, Ph.D., and others, Massachusetts voters submitted over 80,000 signatures in support of the new law. If passed, Massachusetts would become the 17th state to contradict the federal government’s unethical and increasingly unpopular refusal to allow the medical uses of marijuana.



April 1, 2012


  Mental Health Today "Altering Perceptions" by Richard Shrubb.

Mental Health Today examines how psychedelic research has changed over the last fifty years. The article profiles Dr. Ben Sessa, a psychiatrist who studied the safety of MDMA for the United Kingdom’s Advisory Council for the Misuse of Drugs in 2009. Psychedelic research is also being done in the United States by MAPS, with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a promising treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Sessa believes that “one has to weigh up the dangers of a drug being used therapeutically against the benefits it brings.”


  Kush Magazine "War Crimes: Suppressing Scientific Study of Cannabis is a Shocking Admission of Ulterior Motives" by David B. Allen, M.D..

Kush Magazine explains how despite having a patent on the medical use of cannabinoids and maintaining a monopoly on the supply of marijuana for research, the federal government continues to block research that could make marijuana into a medicine.



March 22, 2012


  Boing Boing "Tim Leary’s Floatation Tank For Sale" by David Pescovitz.

The “floatation tank,” sometimes called the isolation or sensory deprivation tank, was developed in the mid-1950’s by psychoanalyst and consciousness researcher John C. Lilly, M.D. Lilly used the isolation tank to test the relationship between the mind and external reality. After extensive experimentation with the tank, he came to explore it for many potential applications, ranging from increasing creative problem-solving ability to facilitating meditation and prayer.

This tank was originally owned by the controversial psychedelic researcher Timothy Leary. In February of 1996, Dr. Lilly and the Samadhi Tank Company delivered the tank to Dr. Leary to help ease his end-of-life suffering. The current owner is Dean Chamberlain, photographer and renowned visionary artist who has generously agreed to share proceeds from the sale with MAPS to benefit of psychedelic and medical marijuana research and education.

Click here to view the eBay listing.



March 16, 2012


  Medscape "Psychedelic Drug May Have a Role in Psychotherapy" by Megan Brooks.

A new study conducted at Imperial College London and funded in part by MAPS finds that psilocybin’s ability to enhance memory recall in healthy adults can be measured through functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Lead study author Robin Carhart-Harris, Ph.D., proposes that the results may have implications for the use of psilocybin in psychotherapy.



March 14, 2012


  Voice of America "Scientists Explore Hallucinogen Treatments for PTSD, Sex Abuse Victims" by Adam Phillips.

International multimedia broadcaster Voice of America presents a fascinating and wide-ranging interview with MAPS founder and executive director Rick Doblin, Ph.D., and discusses the long history and promising future of psychedelics as tools for healing and personal growth.

Click here to listen to the interview (mp3).



March 9, 2012


  TIME Healthland "LSD May Help Treat Alcoholism" by Maia Szalavitz.

TIME reports on the results of a new Norwegian study which found that 59% of subjects who were administered a single dose of LSD significantly reduced their alcohol use up to six months following treatment. The study was published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, and takes up where earlier studies left off in the 1950s, revealing the immense potential of psychedelics to help people overcome addiction.



March 6, 2012


  West Coast Leaf "Researcher Sues DEA for Blocking Medical Research" by Stephen Morseman, MAPS.

West Coast Leaf reports on how Prof. Lyle Craker’s efforts to start a medical marijuana production facility under license to MAPS are still being blocked by the DEA. While veterans’ groups, researchers, and state legislators alike already recognize the effectiveness of marijuana for symptoms of PTSD, the DEA continues to stand in the way.



February 24, 2012


  The New York Times "Branding a Soldier With ‘Personality Disorder’" by James Dao.

The New York Times reports that a single diagnosis of PTSD can cost $1.5 million in taxpayer-funded benefits over a soldier’s lifetime. This gives military commanders an incentive to issue unwarranted but cheaper diagnoses, and highlights the need for cheaper and more effective treatments.



February 23, 2012


  City on a Hill Press "Taking Psychedelics to the Next Level" by KellyAnn Kelso.

On February 15, Prof. James Fadiman and the UC Santa Cruz Brain Mind & Consciousness Society hosted an evening lecture event about the use of psychedelics for healing, personal growth, and creativity. Dr. Fadiman, author of the pathbreaking new book The Psychedelic Explorer’s Guide: Safe, Therapeutic, and Sacred Journeys spoke to a packed auditorium of students and local community members about what researchers know about the risks and benefits of psychedelics.



February 17, 2012


  Wired "The Forgetting Pill Erases Painful Memories Forever" by Jonah Lehrer.

Neuroscience is shedding a new light on the way that memories are formed and remembered in the human brain. New research is showing that the very act of remembering changes the memory itself—that the context in which a specific event is remembered can dramatically influence that memory. When it comes to traumatic memories, then, drugs that positively alter the emotional context in which they are recalled—such as MDMA—could make it easier for people to confront their most painful memories.



February 9, 2012


  Santa Cruz Patch "Psychedelic Anesthetic Helps Treat Depression" by David Jay Brown.

The dissociative anesthetic ketamine, which is both a legal anesthetic and a popular recreational drug, could have fast-acting, though perhaps short-lived, antidepressant properties. In the 1990s, MAPS helped fund a Russian study which demonstrated that ketamine combined with psychotherapy showed promise as a treatment for alcoholism and heroin addiction. Now, a series of new studies are once again renewing interest in the therapeutic properties of ketamine and its chemical cousins.

Also check out Karl Jensen’s Ketamine: Dreams and Realities on the MAPS Store for a comprehensive overview of the therapeutic and spiritual uses of ketamine.



February 1, 2012


  The Huffington Post "Guided Psychedelic Sessions" by Craig K. Comstock.

The Huffington Post publishes a strong review of James Fadiman’s pathbreaking new book, The Psychedelic Explorer’s Guide: Safe, Therapeutic, and Sacred Journeys (available in the MAPS Store).


  The Daily Collegian "Study: Marijuana negative health claims go up in smoke" by Ardee Napolitano.

The results of a 5,000-subject, two-decade long study show that unlike tobacco, regular marijuana smoking does not damage lung performance over the long term. The results suggest that smoked marijuana may in fact be a safe medicine, though federal obstruction has blocked clinical research into this potential. University of Massachusetts-Amherst Prof. Lyle Craker comments on the results. Prof. Craker and MAPS are currently engaged in a lawsuit against the DEA to grow marijuana for FDA-approved clinical research.



January 31, 2012


  NPR "‘I Wanted To Live’: New Depression Drugs Offer Hope For Toughest Cases" by Jon Hamilton.

NPR explores new research suggesting that ketamine could be an effective short-term treatment for severe depression. Listen to the broadcast here.


  Santa Cruz Weekly "MDMA And The Cure for PTSD" by Maria Grusauskas.

The front page article in the Santa Cruz Weekly tells the whole story: A traumatized veteran speaks out about how MDMA helped him, the black market widens the gulf between “Ecstasy” and pure MDMA, and MAPS finds real therapeutic benefit in MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD.



January 28, 2012


  Santa Cruz Patch "Can Ecstasy Help Treat Autism?" by David Jay Brown.

The Santa Cruz Patch reports on the latest from the field of psychedelic research: MAPS’ offer of $10,000 to a research team that can develop a new protocol to explore whether MDMA could help treat autism spectrum disorders or Asperger’s syndrome in adults.



January 27, 2012


  Reality Sandwich "Two Psychedelic Conferences a World Apart" by Nese Lisa Senol.

An article on Reality Sandwich explores two sides of the psychedelic renaissance: Entheogenesis Australis 2011, an outdoor conference celebrating psychedelic culture and spirituality, and Cartographie Psychedelica, MAPS’ own 25th anniversary conference and celebration in December 2011. As the article points out, MAPS’ events are distinguished an innovative integration of culture, creativity, and rigorous science.


  Psychology Today "New Treatments to Combat Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder" by Jared DeFife, Ph.D..

With PTSD affecting almost 7% of American adults and few effective treatment options available, research into innovative approaches to PTSD treatment is expanding rapidly. “The Shrink Tank” blog at Psychology Today explores some of the most promising approaches, including MDMA-assisted psychotherapy.



January 25, 2012


  Silicon Valley Metro "Critics Counter County’s Claim of Ecstasy Epidemic" by Maria Grusauskas.

Health officials are concerned about a rise in recreational Ecstasy use, and law enforcement and researchers agree that the danger lies not in the MDMA (which illegal Ecstasy may or may not contain) but in the uncertainty of the criminal black market.


  New Zealand Herald "Could Magic Mushrooms Help Fight Depression?" by Independent.

The New Zealand Herald reports on the results of two new UK psilocybin studies that researchers claim point to the drug’s possible use in depression treatment. The article also includes a few interesting facts about the history of psychedelic and medical cannabis research.


  Philadelphia Weekly "Iraq War Veterans Turn to Marijuana for Managing PTSD Symptoms" by Randy LoBasso.

Jason Mays and Amy Herrera are among the many veterans struggling to find effective treatments for PTSD. While there may not yet be a cure, marijuana could provide these suffering patients with significant relief—yet the federal government so far continues to block MAPS’ efforts to conduct research for making it a legal prescription medicine. The Philadelphia Weekly reports on how researchers, doctors, and patients alike are calling on the government to allow the research.



January 24, 2012


  UK National Health Service "Scans Reveal Brain Effects of Magic Mushrooms" by NHS.

The UK National Health Service published this report in response to the extensive media interest in a pair of recent studies led by former UK government drugs advisor David Nutt. The research, funded in part by MAPS along with the Beckley Foundation, the Neuropsychoanalysis Foundation, and the Heffter Research Institute, suggested that psilocybin’s possible antidepressant effects may be connected to its effect on specific brain regions. The NHS points out that the studies were preliminary, and that research has yet to determine whether psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy is a viable treatment for depression.


  TalkTalk "Magic Mushroom Mechanism Revealed"

TalkTalk examines Professor David Nutt’s research into psilocybin using fMRI machines. Nutt’s study was funded by MAPS and found that decreased activity of key brain areas with psilocybin may permit ‘unconstrained style of cognition’.



January 23, 2012


  Bloomberg "’Shrooms May Help Treat Depression: Study" by Makiko Kitamura.

Bloomberg reports on the results of a pair of studies published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and the British Journal of Psychiatry hinting at psilocybin’s effect on brain function and memory. The results are encouraging for researchers interested in the possible role of psilocybin in the treatment of anxiety and depression.


  The Scientist "Scanning the Psychedelic Brain" by Ruth Williams.

A new brain imaging study suggests that psilocybin’s effect on human consciousness may be linked to how it suppresses, rather than activates, certain brain areas. This fascinating finding was the outcome of research conducted by UK researchers and funded in part by MAPS. The Scientist interviews several leading psychedelic researchers about the possible therapeutic implications of these results as well as the challenges of conducting government-approved research on psychedelic drugs.


  BBC News "Mind-Altering Drugs Research Call from Prof David Nutt" by Pallab Ghosh.

BBC News reports on new research funded in part by MAPS into the effects of psilocybin on memory and brain function. Senior study investigator Prof. David Nutt, who was fired as lead drugs advisor to the UK government for saying that MDMA and LSD were less harmful than alcohol, saw the results as evidence for the therapeutic potential of psychedelics. According to Prof. Nutt, “We need to have a more scientific rational approach to drugs, and vilifying drugs like psilocybin whilst at the same time actively promoting much more dangerous drugs like alcohol is totally stupid scientifically.” Watch the interview (scroll down) with lead study author Robin Carhart-Harris on the BBC website.


  Reuters "Psychedelic Mushroom Trips Point to New Depression Drugs" by Kate Kelland.

Two new British studies funded in part by MAPS—one a brain imaging study and one involving memory—have produced additional evidence for psilocybin’s possible role in the treatment of anxiety and depression. The studies are preliminary, but highlight the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to psychedelic research.


  Nature "Psychedelic Chemical Subdues Brain Activity" by Mo Costandi.

Nature News reports on the results of a new brain imaging study by neuropsychopharmacologist David Nutt and colleagues at Imperial College London that psilocybin decreased activity in parts of the brain associated with depression and anxiety. The authors suggest the results could help explain some of psilocybin’s therapeutic benefits. MAPS contributed funding for the study, as did the Beckley Foundation, the Neuropsychoanalysis Foundation, and the Heffter Research Institute.



January 22, 2012


  The Oxford Student "Happy Birthday MDMA" by Jack Hutchison.

The Oxford Student recaps the turbulent history of MDMA one century after its creation. From an unrecognized chemical to a widely used (and abused) party drug to a promising therapeutic tool, MDMA has challenged and excited researchers for generations.



January 17, 2012


  The Atlantic "The Case for Treating PTSD in Veterans With Medical Marijuana" by Martin Mulcahey.

The Atlantic makes a compelling case for the federal government to allow MAPS’ FDA-cleared study of marijuana for veterans with PTSD to move forward: In the struggle between legitimate medical research and irrational government fear, veterans are the ones caught in the crossfire.

Correction: The Atlantic writes: “The plan is contingent upon final approval by a Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) scientific review panel, which is likely to ratify the proposal after the project leader, Dr. Sue Sisley, alleviated the Food and Drug Administration’s concerns over safety precautions.” In fact, the FDA cleared the protocol in April 2011, and the National Institute on Drug Abuse and Public Health Service (which are part of HHS) review committee later rejected it, refusing to sell MAPS the marijuana needed to conduct the study. The study is on hold either until NIDA agrees to sell our researchers the marijuana, until MAPS succeeds in growing its own marijuana for research, or until the marijuana can be legally imported.



January 13, 2012


  Macleans (Canada) "The Ecstasy and the Agony" by Colby Cosh.

A well-written article in Macleans explains how the illegal status of MDMA creates a dangerous black market in adulterated Ecstasy pills. The gulf between the relative safety and healing potential of MDMA in therapeutic contexts and the uncertainty of recreational Ecstasy use is widened by current harm-maximization drug policies.



January 4, 2012


  Vancouver Observer "Despite death and overdose, therapeutic Ecstasy shows promise" by David P. Ball.

MAPS researchers share their frustrations getting our planned Canadian study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD up and running. After three inspections of the Vancouver pharmacy that will be used to store the MDMA to be used in the study, Health Canada has changed the requirements for receiving a Controlled Substances license and requested that additional changes be made. The Vancouver Observer speaks with lead investigators Ingrid Pacey, M.D., and Andrew Feldmår, Ph.D., about the challenges of initiating psychedelic psychotherapy research in Canada.



January 3, 2012


  The Chronicle of Higher Education "Does Ecstasy Really Cause Brain Damage?" by Tom Bartlett.

The Chronicle of Higher Education speaks with MAPS Director of Communications Brad Burge about a new study of recreational Ecstasy use, the tricky issue of study design, and how sensationalist headlines can dangerously distort scientific results.


contract 2011 Media Articles...


December 28, 2011


  Catalyst Magazine "Academia on Acid" by Greta Belanger deJong.

Catalyst Magazine publishes this enthusiastic review of MAPS’ 25th anniversary “Cartographie Psychedelica” conference and celebration, highlighting the various facets of the four-day event that made it such a success. From academic discussions to participatory artwork, the conference brought together researchers, academics, artists, and activists of all kinds.



December 21, 2011


  MAKO News (Israel) "Without Ecstasy, I Would Not Be Here Today" by Eleanor Fox.

An Israeli news source describes MAPS’ upcoming Israeli study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. The article includes an excellent interview with Tali Nachshoni, M.D., who was one of three therapists who recently participated in MAPS training study for MDMA-assisted psychotherapists in the U.S. Dr. Nachsoni describes her own experience undergoing MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as part of MAPS’ training program for clinical MDMA-assisted psychotherapy investigators. The study will begin enrolling and treating subjects in early 2012.



December 20, 2011


  Shroomfest "Showcasing Telluride at the MAPS Conference" by Shroompa.

The Telluride Mushroom Festival was one of the many partners and exhibitors that helped make MAPS’ 25th anniversary conference and celebration such a huge success. Here is their own account of the sights, sounds, and knowledge shared at Cartographie Psychedelica.



December 19, 2011


  TIME Healthland "The Case Against the Ban on ‘Bath Salts’ and Fake Marijuana" by Maia Szalavitz.

An incisive article on TIME.com points out the severe restrictions that emergency bans place on research than can be done to determine the actual risks and safety of new compounds. MAPS was founded in 1986 after such an irrational scheduling—that of MDMA. The tide is only now starting to turn—25 years later, we’re learning what emergency bans can do to hinder careful scientific investigation.



December 18, 2011


  Vision Thing "MAPS 25th Anniversary Conference Report" by Bruce Eisner.

Author and psychologist Bruce Eisner recalls his own experience watching MAPS grow from a twinkle in Rick Doblin’s eye into the fast-growing international non-profit research organization it is today. MAPS’ 25th anniversary was an excellent opportunity to reflect on all the domains—scientific, medical, legal, spiritual—in which MAPS’ research now plays an important role.



December 13, 2011


  HealthDay "‘Ecstasy’ May Cause Long-Term Changes in Brain Chemistry" by Alan Mozes.

A new study shows an association between long-term illegal Ecstasy use and long-term changes in brain chemistry. The researchers note, however, that they did not find any associated changes in mental health or cognitive functioning, nor do they know whether the chemical changes last forever. The study’s implications are also limited for other reasons, as MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research Michael Mithoefer, M.D., points out in his response.

The study fails to ask the crucial methodological questions addressed in a study published in February 2011 by Harvard University’s John Halpern, M.D., which found no evidence of cognitive changes in long-term Ecstasy users.

The HealthDay article appeared on Health.com, U.S. News and World Report, and other news sources.


  Popular Science "Can a Single Injection Cure the Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder?" by Clay Dillow.

The urgent need for research into effective treatments for PTSD is leading some military physicians to propose some fairly radical new solutions. The most recent suggestion by a Navy doctor—involving a single injection of an anesthetic to the neck—is likely to be even more controversial than the comparatively conservative MDMA-assisted psychotherapy approach being studied by MAPS. PTSD is a complex biopsychosocial condition, and as the article points out the idea of a magic, one-step cure is probably “too good to be true.”



December 6, 2011


  Alternet "Can Ecstasy Treat Autism?" by Dirk Hanson, The Fix.

Alternet is the first to report on MAPS’ new MDMA for autism research grant, which is it offering to a team of researchers interested in developing a protocol for a new study of MDMA-assisted therapy for Asperger’s syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorders. Neuroscience and anecdotal reports already suggest that MDMA’s ability to enhance empathy and communication could make it a viable treatment for individuals suffering from these disorders, and we hope to conduct the research to find out whether that’s true.


  Bloomberg "‘Magic Mushrooms’ Return to Psychology Labs" by Elizabeth Lopatto.

Bloomberg reports on the resurgence of mainstream interest in psychedelic research, especially in recent studies on psilocybin’s possible therapeutic benefits. Scientists are finding through careful clinical trials that psychedelics, when used in the proper settings, can be powerful tools for emotional and even spiritual healing.



December 3, 2011


  Whitehouse.gov | Change.org "Veterans Supporting Marijuana Research for PTSD Start Petitions on Whitehouse.gov and Change.org" by Veterans for Medical Cannabis Access | Sgt. Ryan Begin (U.S. Marine Corps-Ret.).

A petition has been created by the Veterans for Medical Cannabis Association (VMCA) on the U.S. government’s “We the People” Whitehouse.gov web site in order to help gain support for a U.S. policy change that would allow disabled military veterans to access medical marijuana to treat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). According to the web site, “cannabis is an effective medicine…to ease the symptoms of PTSD, giving disabled Veterans a big improvement in their quality of life.” Here’s a link to find out more.

Another petition was created by a veteran at Change.org to send a message to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the DEA to stop blocking MAPS’ medical marijuana research for treating veterans with PTSD. This petition specifically addresses the medical marijuana study proposed by MAPS to study how cannabis affects veterans with PTSD. The proposed study has been approved by the FDA, but has been blocked by NIDA’s refusal to allow the researchers to purchase the cannabis necessary to conduct it. According to Sergeant Ryan Begin of the United States Marine Corps—who served two tours in Iraq, and suffers from PTSD—his condition “received the greatest benefit from medical marijuana.” So it’s not surprising that a lot of veterans are upset about NIDA and the DEA’s attempt to block medical research and want to do something about it. More information about this petition can be found here.



November 29, 2011


  Los Angeles Times "Turn on, tune in, and get better?" by Melissa Healy.

Researchers, therapists, patients, and policy experts are acknowledging the extent of psychedelics’ return to mainstream science and medicine. From LSD and MDMA to psilocybin and ketamine, these substances are increasingly recognized for their ability to catalyze profound emotional, psychological, and even physical healing. A quote from MAPS Founder and Executive Director Rick Doblin, Ph.D., says it all: “We’re trying to break a social mindset saying these are strictly drugs of abuse…It’s not the drug but how the drug is used that matters.”

The article appeared on the front page of the Los Angeles Times (November 29, 2011).


  San Francisco Bay Guardian "Celebrating 25 Years of Drug Research with the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies" by Caitlin Donohue.

The SF Bay Guardian reports on MAPS’ 25th Anniversary conference, Cartographie Psychedelica, taking place from December 8-12, 2011. From in-depth workshops and riveting lectures to interactive art and electronic DJs, the event marks a historic turning point for the continued mainstreaming of psychedelic and medical marijuana research.



November 20, 2011


  The Age (Australia) "Call for Ecstasy to Treat Trauma Stress" by Jill Stark.

Positive coverage in Australian media shows public support is growing for a possible new study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD to take place in Australia. It’s a very good sign that even those known to exaggerate the risks of MDMA acknowledge the importance of MAPS’ research.

Note: MAPS’ clinical trials use pure MDMA, not illicit Ecstasy tablets which often contain other more dangerous compounds, in combination with psychotherapy to treat PTSD. Another correction to the article is that researchers at NYU are using psilocybin, not LSD. The only clinical LSD research in the last 35 years has been MAPS’ recently completed Swiss study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy for end-of-life anxiety.



November 16, 2011


  Santa Cruz Patch "25 Years of Psychedelic Drug Research to be Celebrated" by David Jay Brown.

David Jay Brown, award-winning author and MAPS Bulletin guest editor, points out that MAPS’ upcoming 25th anniversary, courageously entitled Cartographie Psychedelica, is more than a celebration: It’s an historic event marking the return of psychedelics and medical marijuana to mainstream science, medicine, and culture.

“While a lot of music and visionary art has long been influenced by psychedelics, and many artists and musicians have greatly valued the experience,” Brown writes, “The recently awakened acceptance of these forbidden fruits in respected cultural terrains, such as academia, medicine, and spirituality, is now, finally, seeping its way into the mainstream culture.”


  Wired Magazine "Vet to Feds: Enough Stonewalling, Give Us Pot for PTSD" by Katie Drummond.

A powerful petition by a wounded Iraq veteran is putting a human face on MAPS’ struggle to end the federal medical marijuana research blockade. Sgt. Ryan Begin, United States Marine Corps (Ret.), is calling on NIDA and the DEA to stop standing in the way of MAPS’ proposed study of marijuana for veterans with PTSD so that he and his fellow veterans can get the relief they need. Sometimes, it makes the most sense to hear it from those who are most affected by the government’s obstruction of medical marijuana research.

 



November 14, 2011


  The Fix "LSD Inventor’s Remarkable Letter to Steve Jobs" by Vince Beiser.

Apple’s late founder Steve Jobs once said that taking “LSD was one of the two or three most important things I have done in my life.” In 2007, LSD inventor Albert Hofmann (at 101) sent Jobs a personal handwritten note asking Jobs to support MAPS’ (now completed) Swiss study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy for end-of-life anxiety. The Fix has posted the letter on its website for a rare glimpse of this connection between two revolutionary inventors.


  The Atlantic Wire "The Inventor of LSD Asked Steve Jobs for PR Help" by Rebecca Greenfield.

In 2007, MAPS Founder and Executive Director Rick Doblin asked LSD inventor Albert Hofmann to send Apple founder Steve Jobs a letter asking him to support research into the beneficial applications of Hofmann’s “problem child.” Jobs never did contribute to MAPS or to psychedelic research, but led to a heartfelt conversation between Doblin and the famous innovator and entrepreneur.



November 7, 2011


  The New York Times "California Dispensaries Moving to Block U.S. Marijuana Crackdown" by Erik Eckholm.

In the continuing legal battle over medical cannabis in California, attorneys for the medical cannabis industry said that they are seeking court orders to halt an imminent crackdown by the U.S. federal government on medical cannabis dispensaries, their landlords, and cannabis growers. In a legal motion filed on November 8, medical cannabis distributors and some medical patients are asking federal judges in four districts of Northern and Central California to issue temporary restraining orders that would prevent federal prosecutors from taking action.

MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin, Ph.D., has spoken about the federal obstruction of medical marijuana research and in support of this collective injunction against the cannabis dispensary crackdown. His statements appear in the legal proceedings for the case as a declaration of support for the plaintiff’s petition (for Northern, Central, and Southern California plaintiffs).



November 2, 2011


  The Fix "Government Foot-Dragging Denies Pot Relief to Traumatized Veterans" by Jed Bickman.

The federal blockade on medical marijuana research is directly affecting real veterans suffering from combat-related PTSD. In this short article, Sgt. Jamey Raines, who himself used marijuana to cope with PTSD symptoms after serving in Iraq, calls on the federal government to allow medical marijuana research.



November 1, 2011


  Vision Magazine "MAPS: 25 Years of Rigorous Science and Visionary Culture" by MAPS.

MAPS’ 25th anniversary celebration, Cartographie Psychedelica, will explore the connections between science and art with four days of workshops, lectures, original performances, artwork, and more.



October 26, 2011


  Miller-McCune "More Evidence That MDMA Could Ease PTSD" by Michael Scott Moore.

European Dispatch explains how MAPS’ possible UK study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD will build on the outstanding results of our flagship U.S. study. If we can find the funding necessary for this study, it will be the first-ever clinical trial of MDMA in the UK and the latest addition to our expanding international MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research program.


  Wired "Bummer: Feds Stonewall Pot Treatments For Traumatized Vets" by Katie Drummond.

Wired magazine reports on NIDA’s recent refusal to sell MAPS researchers marijuana for our FDA-cleared study of marijuana for veterans with PTSD.  According to researcher Sue Sisley, M.D., “At this point, I can’t help but think they simply don’t want to move forward. Maybe they figure if they stall long enough, we’ll give up and go away.” Read more about MAPS’ ongoing efforts to conduct medical marijuana research for veterans.



October 25, 2011


  Santa Cruz Patch "African Psychedelic Plant Offers Hope for Drug Addiction" by David Jay Brown.

David Jay Brown shares information about using the psychedelic drug, ibogaine, for curing addiction. He explains the way that the drug works to block withdrawal symptoms as well as the physical dependency of drugs like opiates. MAPS is currently funding ibogaine research in Mexico, with plans to begin a new study in New Zealand.



October 21, 2011


  Back Page Magazine "What The Hell is This Drug Salvia?" by John Stapleton IV.

Backpage Magazine explores everything about Salvia divinorum in a new article. Salvia’s legal nature and extremely intense effects make it a very controversial subject. Rick Doblin of MAPS advocates research into its safety and effects, though he suggests, “Very few people would be going to salvia if they had alternatives.”


  High Times "MAPS 25th Anniversary Cartographie Psychedelica Tour" by Mary Ought Six.

A High Times writer describes her time attending MAPS 25th Anniversary Cartographie Psychedelica Tour in New York City. She was seated next to intrigued scholars for dinner and listened to some of the brightest minds speak about psychedelics and the future of psychedelic research.



October 20, 2011


  The Georgetown Voice "Support medical marijuana for PTSD victims" by Editorial Board.

One of the most common ways to attempt to treat people suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a drug called Risperdal, but recent research shows that the drug is only as effective as a placebo. The proposed MAPS research study for using medical marijuana to help veterans with PTSD was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in April, but recently the Department of Health and Human Services refused to sell MAPS the government-grown medical marijuana necessary for the research. MAPS plans to fight this decision until the research can properly be completed.



October 17, 2011


  USA Today "Are Today’s Parents Going Too Soft on Kids Using Marijuana?" by Karen Weintraub.

An article that begins and ends in the usual fashion—with scary, unfounded stories about how marijuana is destroying America’s youth—nevertheless includes a brief mention about how the federal government stifles studies that could call those stories into question. NIDA Director Nora Volkow thinks that she knows all she needs to know about marijuana’s risks and benefits, but MAPS Director of Communications Brad Burge gets a word in edgewise.



October 16, 2011


  The Washington Post "Marijuana may help PTSD. Why won’t the government find out for sure?" by Steve Fox, Marijuana Policy Project.

A persuasive Washington Post op-ed condems the federal government’s ongoing refusal to allow legitimate, necessary medical marijuana research from moving forward (“Marijuana may help PTSD. Why won’t the government find out for sure?” October 14, 2011). The op-ed follows an earlier Washington Post feature article on the federal obstruction of marijuana research. Download the original op-ed here (pdf).



October 14, 2011


  Reality Sandwich "A Declaration of Psychedelic Studies" by Nese Lisa Senol.

Nese Senol presents an elegant essay about new options for students interested in pursuing academic careers in psychedelic research and education. A condensed version of this essay also appeared in the Winter 2011 MAPS Bulletin.



October 12, 2011


  Noetic Now Journal "Psilocybin at the End of Life: A Doorway to Peace" by Stephen Ross, MD.

Stephen Ross, M.D., has been conducting research at NYU on the effects of psilocybin mushrooms on cancer patients reaching the end of their life. He posits that psilocybin can truly bring about spiritual states, which is why it is so important to study it from a psychological standpoint. His research in cancer patients so far has shown decreased death anxiety, decreased depression, greater integration back into daily life, improved family function, and increased spiritual states.



October 11, 2011


  Downtown Devil "Downtown University of Arizona Professor Defends Value of Medical Marijuana Study" by Mauro Whiteman.

Mairjuana researcher and University of Arizona professor Sue Sisley, M.D., recently spoke to doctors and medical marijuana patients in Phoenix, Arizona about the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s (NIDA) obstruction of her proposed MAPS-sponsored study involving clinical trials of medical marijuana and veterans with PTSD.  he blocked study would take place in Phoenix, potentially at University of Arizona College of Medicine. Sisley stated that NIDA has a “government-enforced monopoly on the legal supply of marijuana” and that NIDA is one of the biggest obstacles to researching medical properties of the plant.



October 10, 2011


  Just Say Now "Obama’s Multi-Agency War on Medical Marijuana" by Jon Walker.

U.S. President Barack Obama has not followed through on his campaign promises to allow states to enforce their own medical marijuana laws. Obama’s administration has recently used the Internal Revenue Service, the Department of Justice, the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) against medical marijuana patients and dispensaries, after promising not to interfere. Most recently, HHS refused to sell government-grown medical marijuana to MAPS for a FDA-approved medical marijuana study for United States veterans with PTSD.



October 9, 2011


  Huffington Post "Obama: From First to Worst on Medical Marijuana" by Rob Kampia, Marijuana Policy Project.

Despite his 2008 campaign promises, President Barack Obama has been faltering on his original claims that he would allow medical marijuana to be left in the hands of individual states. His administration’s Department of Health and Human Services recently refused to sell government-grown medical marijuana to MAPS for our approved research on American combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder. According to the argument presented in this article, compared to other United States presidents, Obama’s recent actions surrounding medical marijuana may mark him as the worst president in history for medical marijuana.



October 6, 2011


  Slate "Did Dropping Acid Make Steve Jobs More Creative?" by Brian Palmer.

In the aftermath of Steve Jobs’ death, his quote about taking LSD has resurfaced. Jobs described taking LSD as one of the most important things that he did in his life. Here, Slate explores the idea that LSD could have positive effects on creativity. Research on LSD and its effect on creativity happened in the 1950’s, conducted separately by Oscar Janiger of UC Irvine and psychiatrist Louis Berlin. Their research suggests that LSD can encourage creativity in those who are creative to begin with.



October 5, 2011


  AlterNet "The Federal Government ‘Ardently Supports’ Medical Marijuana Research?! Who Knew?" by Paul Armentano, NORML.

Tennessee Congressman Steven Cohen recently wrote a letter to Gil Kerlikowske, the Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, requesting that the Obama Administration remove marijuana from the list of Schedule I controlled substances. In Kerlikowske’s response, he claimed that the government “ardently support[s] research” on marijuana’s medicinal uses, and that the DEA has approved every valid marijuana research proposal. His false statements arrived just days after publications began writing about the Department of Health and Human Services refusing to sell government-grown marijuana to MAPS for FDA-reviewed research.


  Digital Journal "Psychedelics conference in NYC Oct 14 - 16" by Elizabeth Cunningham Perkins.

The fifth annual Horizons Conference in New York City featured talks about the current state of psychedelic research, creating psychedelic art, debates, and more. Scientists presented the latest in psychedelic research progress and MAPS was there to participate and help make it happen.



October 4, 2011


  High Times "Feds Stress Out Over Proposed PTSD Pot Study" by Mark Miller.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave MAPS permission to initiate research on the effects marijuana and people with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The Health and Human Services Department (HHS) has refused to sell researchers the government-grown marijuana necessary for the research until a list of contradictory conditions are met.

 


  Focus Magazine Blog "Ecstasy and Its Use in Therapy" by Kieron Allen.

Professor David Nutt and psychiatrist Dr. Ben Sessa are considering recreating a MAPS-sponsored study in the United Kingdom about the effects of MDMA on people with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The original study conducted in the United States resulted in 83% of the participants reporting a significant improvement to their condition after a two month period. The new study would incorporate neuroimaging to provide insight into the effects of MDMA on the brain, and would be the first-ever human clinical trial of MDMA to take place in the UK.

 


  Anxiety.org "Marijuana Study for PTSD Halted by Government" by Anxiety.org.

In April, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved MAPS to use thirteen pounds of government-grown medical marijuana to treat U.S. combat veterans with Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The study has been halted by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) until revisions are made to the original research proposal. Researchers in Israel have been studying the effects of marijuana on rats showing signs of PTSD after being induced with stress. Their results suggest that there is a specific time-frame that allows for marijuana to be most effective after traumatic events. Our veterans’ windows of time are slowly closing due to interference from the HHS.



October 3, 2011


  Discover Blogs "Drug in Magic Mushrooms Linked to Long-Lasting Personality Change for the Better" by 80beats.

Researchers at John Hopkins University are revisiting their previous psilocybin research studies from 2006 and February 2011 to see if the psychedelic had any change on the participants over time. The latest results reveal that some of the participants showed long-lasting improvements in relationships, mood, and general well-being, as described by themselves and their family members. This research suggests that psilocybin’s medicinal use may not be limited to treating the mentally ill but could also be useful for healthy people.


  TIME Healthland "‘Magic Mushrooms’ Trigger Lasting Personality Change" by Maia Szalavitz.

Katherine MacLean, a postdoctoral student at Johns Hopkins University, led a team of researchers to study the effects of psilocybin on a group of 52 participants who had already completed similar trials with the researchers. The results showed that psilocybin made some users more open to new ideas, as well as providing a positive personality change amongst some, as observed by subjects and their families. Researcher Roland Griffiths also noted that they had not seen any negative long-term side effects of the drug. While some users became uncomfortable at times, the effects were time-sensitive and dissipated within hours. Next, MacLean and Griffiths plan to conduct research on the effects of psilocybin in cancer patients who are depressed and/or anxious as a result of their illness. Their goal is to eventually be able to use psychedelics as part of approved treatments for mental illness and to study consciousness as a whole.


  Denver Westword Blogs "Marijuana PTSD Study Roadblock Example of Feds’ Schizophrenia, Says Brian Vicente" by Michael Roberts.

Brian Vicente of Sensible Colorado is fighting for American combat veterans with PTSD to be allowed to use medical marijuana to help relieve their symptoms. In April, The Food and Drug Administration gave MAPS approval to conduct a study of whether marijuana could help fifty veterans suffering from PTSD. The study has been put on hold due to the Department of Health and Human Services refusing to sell government-grown medical marijuana to MAPS. For Vicente and many others, HHS’ refusal to support veterans in need is unacceptable.



October 1, 2011


  UPI "U.K. doctors to study benefits of ecstasy" by UPI.

Researchers in the UK are hoping to obtain funding for what would be the first-ever clinical trial of MDMA in the UK. The study, which would be led by UK researchers David Nutt, M.D., and Ben Sessa, M.D., and sponsored by MAPS, would explore the safety and effectiveness of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for people with PTSD. The study would build on MAPS’ flagship US study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy by adding an additional neuroimaging component, adding to the rapidly growing scientific knowledge about the safety and effectiveness of MDMA administered in clinical contexts.


  The Daily Mail "Could ecstasy help victims of child abuse, rape and crime?" by Daily Mail Reporter.

While we have not yet received regulatory approval or funding for the study described in this article, researchers are encouraged by a recent invitation from the Wellcome Trust to submit a grant request for a possible study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD to take place in the UK. Potential Clinical Investigators David Nutt, M.D., and Ben Sessa, M.D., describe the significance of the study, which would be the first clinical MDMA trial ever to take place in the UK and which could—by using brain imaging technology—greatly add to current knowledge about the safety and effects of MDMA administered in clinical contexts. The article also mentions a recent study by Johns Hopkins scientist Roland Griffiths that found that psilocybin could have a lasting positive effect on personality.


  The Washington Post "Marijuana study of traumatized veterans stuck in regulatory limbo" by Brian Vastag.

MAPS’ medical marijuana research made national headlines once again with this article in The Washington Post about the federal government’s recent refusal to sell MAPS marijuana for our planned study of marijuana for veterans with PTSD. Reviewers from the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Public Health Service refused to allow MAPS to purchase marijuana for the study, despite the study protocol already having approval from the FDA.

According to the article, the reviewers’ comments are “a jumbled picture of sometimes contradictory concerns” and addressing them all could be extremely difficult, if not impossible, and the review process itself may serve only to delay and obstruct medical marijuana research. Pressure is building against the NIDA monopoly and the federal obstruction of medical marijuana research, but meanwhile the study is at a standstill.

Download a PDF of this article.

Learn more about MAPS’ medical marijuana research and legal efforts to end the NIDA monopoly.


  Mindful Metropolis "Treating PTSD With MDMA" by Mary Susan Littlepage.

Mindful Metropolis reports on the current state of research for using MDMA-assisted psychotherapy with United States combat veterans who suffer from Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).  At least 30% of veterans seen by Veterans Administration doctors suffer from PTSD. In the MAPS study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD, the participants had dealt with the condition for 19 years on average, and more than 80% of participants were cured of chronic, treatment-resistant PTSD after their MDMA-assisted therapy sessions. Michael and Annie Mithoefer of MAPS are expected to publish follow-up results of their study by the end of the year, with the phase two results to follow about six months after.



September 30, 2011


  Jezebel "Ecstasy Could Be Treatment For PTSD" by Anna North.

Online women’s magazine Jezebel reports on a recent grant request submitted by UK researchers for a MAPS-sponsored study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD, to take place in the UK. If the study receives funding and regulatory approval, it would be the first clinical trial of MDMA ever to take place in the country.


  The Telegraph (UK) "Ecstasy to be used to help war veterans" by Stephen Adams.

Encouraged by the extremely positive results of our flagship U.S. study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD, researchers are hoping to be able to conduct a similar study in the UK. In the article, prominent psychopharmacologist David Nutt, M.D., describes why he wants to see the study take place: “I feel quite strongly that many drugs with therapeutic potential have been denied to patients and researchers because of the drug’s regulation.” Worldwide, psychedelic research is booming, and researchers are hopeful that the UK could be the next government to put science before politics.


  The Guardian (UK) "Ecstasy trial planned to test benefits for trauma victims" by Sarah Boseley.

The Guardian reports on a possible new study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD to take place in the UK. MAPS, together with psychopharmacologist Dr. David Nutt and psychiatrist Dr. Ben Sessa, has recently been invited to submit a grant proposal to the Wellcome Trust for the study. If it receives funding and regulatory approval, the study would be the first of its kind in the UK. The article concludes with Dr. Nutt’s observation that more cautious UK media such as The Daily Mail would not welcome the news, a recent positive article in that same publication clearly shows that times are changing. As the Guardian article points out, MAPS’ research on MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD “has caused some in the scientific community to think what was until recently unthinkable.”

Additional coverage of MAPS’ possible UK study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD also appeared in The Herald Sun, the Sydney Morning Herald, the Hindustan Times, and The Times of India.


September 29, 2011


  Tucson Weekly "Blocking Good Science" by J.M. Smith.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has continued its trend of blocking FDA-reviewed clinical trials proposed by MAPS. The article compares the relative difficulty of conducting federally-approved research on psychedelics with studies of marijuana, and points out the unlikelihood of NIDA agreeing to let the study move forward.



September 28, 2011


  Salon "Flashback! Psychedelic research returns" by Alexander Zaitchik.

A long and in-depth article on Salon.com sheds light on the wide-open field of medical psychedelic research, focusing primarily on recent and ongoing studies at NYU and Johns Hopkins. The only information that might be added to the piece is that MDMA is probably even closer to approval for medical use than LSD or psilocybin, despite the recent explosion of research into all of these substances.


  Discover Magazine Blogs "Marijuana for PTSD? That’s Leaving Out a Lot of Steps" by 80beats.

A recent study showed that rats injected with WIN 55,212-2, a synthetic cannabinoid like THC, had fewer negative reactions to stressful events than those that were not, suggesting that the compounds found in marijuana could reduce symptoms of PTSD in humans. This short blog post points out that while animal models of stress and anxiety are not necessarily adequate measures of those symptoms in humans, studies like these do add to the growing evidence suggesting that marijuana could help those struggling with PTSD.



September 23, 2011


  TIME Magazine "More Evidence That Marijuana-Like Drugs May Help Prevent PTSD Read more: http://healthland.time.com" by Maia Szalavitz.

A recent study suggests that rats given a synthetic cannabinoid did not react as strongly to severely stressful events as did rats given placebo, adding to the growing scientific evidence that the compounds found in marijuana play a role in mediating stress and anxiety. While the applicability of these results to human beings is uncertain, studies such as these remind us of the promising potential of marijuana as a treatment for PTSD and other disorders.



September 21, 2011


  The Raw Story "DEA faces federal lawsuit for blocking marijuana research" by Eric W. Dolan.

The Raw Story reports on the how MAPS is taking the DEA to court for refusing to let us break the federal monopoly on marijuana for research. Almost a third of the states in the U.S. now allow medical marijuana, and the American Medical Association has already called on the DEA to recognize marijuana’s therapeutic benefits. As the ACLU puts it, “the government is unwilling to put its policy to the test of science.”


  International Business Times "Marijuana Helps Cure PTSD in Rats, Soldiers Could be Next: Study" by International Business Times.

Haifa University has been conducting research on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with rats. After exposing rats to high levels of stress, the researchers split the rats up into four groups and administered marijuana to three of the groups after varying lengths of time. The two groups of rats that received marijuana within the first 24 hours of the induced stress showed no signs of PTSD, although high anxiety was present. The results suggest that there is a “window of time” to treat PTSD and provide hope for research on human subjects.



September 18, 2011


  PRWeb "MAPS to Celebrate 25 Years of Cutting-Edge Research with Seattle Lecture Series and Benefit Auction" by MAPS.

On September 21, 2011, MAPS hosted an evening lecture series and benefit auction at the EM Fine Art Gallery in Seattle, WA, as part of the MAPS 25th Anniversary Cartographie Psychedelica Tour.



September 12, 2011


  Reason Magazine "Bummer: Barack Obama turns out to be just another drug warrior" by Jacob Sullum.

There were many researchers and activists who were optimistic when the early Obama administration promised to put science before politics in its approach to drug policy and regulation. Reason Magazine points out the disappointing facts in this in-depth cover article. Despite Obama’s claims that he would take a public health approach to drugs, he and his appointees in federal law enforcement agencies—including the DEA, which MAPS is currently taking to federal court over the agency’s refusal to permit much-needed medical marijuana research—have so far refused to do so.



September 7, 2011


  Monday Magazine "Drugs with a healing flare" by Danielle Pope.

Victoria’s news and entertainment weekly magazine features a short article on MAPS Canada’s upcoming event in Victoria, BC. Victoria City Councillor and MAPS Canada Board Member Philippe Lucas, M.A., is excited about how Out of Mind: The Therapeutic Uses of Psychedelics to Treat PTSD and Addiction will promote a more rational conversation about the science of drugs-in addition to helping support the research itself. “This is something I can confidently say will be the most revolutionary and boundary-pushing event the city will see all year,” says Lucas. “One of the peripheral harms we’ve seen with [drug control] is throwing the baby out with the bath water ... it’s been great to see a resurgence in the study of therapy drugs to treat these disorders.”



September 2, 2011


  WAMC Northeast Public Radio "UMass Amherst professor says he will appeal DEA denial for medical marijuana grow" by Patrick Donges.

On August 8, after ten years of legal proceedings, the DEA formally rejected UMass Amherst Prof. Lyle Craker’s appeal to grow marijuana for medical research. For Prof. Craker, the battle isn’t over yet: His only recourse is to take the case to the First Circuit of Appeals. The article concludes on a skeptical note, but fails to mention that in the last two decades medical marijuana has gained much acceptance, with 16 states and the District of Columbia now allowing marijuana for medical uses. Prof. Craker’s case may yet turn the tide.


  obnoxi.us "DEA’s Michele Leonhart: If Science Disagrees, We’ll Shut Down Research"

Despite plentiful scientific that marijuana has the potential to ease pain, reduce depression, and even reduce the likelihood of certain kinds of cancer, the DEA still clings to their dogma that marijuana has no medical uses. By officially rejecting Professor Lyle Craker’s request to grow marijuana for federally-regulated research, the DEA has shown that when science disagrees with their policy, they’d rather stop the science than change their routine.


  PRWeb "MAPS Launches Canadian Affiliate, Celebrates 25 Years of Psychedelic Research and Education" by MAPS.

In celebration of 25 years of psychedelic research and education, MAPS and its Canadian affiliate, MAPS Canada, are coordinating two of the the most cutting-edge and scientifically fascinating events of the year. MAPS sent out this press release announcing the launch of MAPS Canada and the two events MAPS Canada is hosting this September—one in Victoria on September 13, 2011 and one in Vancouver on September 18, 2011—to commemorate the launch of MAPS Canada, celebrate MAPS’ 25th anniversary, and raise funds for MAPS Canada’s research on psychedelics and medical cannabis for PTSD, addiction, and other illnesses.



September 1, 2011


  Stars and Stripes "Former platoon sergeant says marijuana was ‘the only thing’ that controlled his PTSD" by Bill Murphy Jr..

Former Army Sgt. Jamey Raines, an Ohio man who returned home from Iraq in 2004 with combat-related PTSD, explains why he used marijuana successfully for nearly five years to cope with his symptoms and help him transition back into civilian life. By telling his story, he hopes to counteract the ongoing stigma on marijuana’s medical potential. MAPS medical marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley of the University of Arizona is also featured in this article, as is MAPS’ own ongoing work to get federal approval to study marijuana for former service members with PTSD.



August 29, 2011


  Guns.com "Soldier’s Clinic Begins Ecstasy Trials to Treat PTSD: Inventive or Crazy?" by Max Slowik.

The pressing need for innovative treatments for PTSD has led to positive coverage from more than one unexpected media source. Here, firearm aficionado site Guns.com describes MAPS’ experimental MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a promising way to help soldiers devastated by their traumatic memories of combat.



August 27, 2011


  Andrew Sullivan's The Daily Beast "Can MDMA Treat PTSD?" by Zoë Pollock.

Andrew Sullivan’s The Daily Beast summarizes recent online media coverage of MAPS’ efforts to get MDMA-assisted psychotherapy approved as a treatment for chronic, treatment-resistant PTSD.



August 25, 2011


  The Republican "DEA rejects UMass Professor Lyle Craker’s bid to grow marijuana for medical research" by Robert Rizzuto.

The DEA rejects Administer Law Judge Mary Ellen Bittner’s 2007 recommendation to grant Prof. Lyle Craker a license to grow medical marijuana for research, continuing to prevent FDA-reviewed research from moving forward. The Republican reminds us of a 2009 letter sent by US Sen. John Kerry and the late Sen. Edward Kennedy to the attorney general in favor of further review Prof. Craker’s application. Unfortunately, the August 24 final order further delays vital research into the therapeutic benefits of marijuana. 



August 24, 2011


  PR Newswire "DEA Upholds Federal Marijuana Monopoly, Obstructing Privately-Funded FDA Research" by MAPS.

MAPS sent out this press release to announce the DEA’s August 24 final order rejecting an earlier judge’s recommendation to grant Prof. Lyle Craker a license to grow medical marijuana for research. MAPS and Prof. Craker’s only recourse is to appeal the decision in the First Circuit Court of Appeals.



August 19, 2011


  Santa Cruz Patch "Shpongle’s Simon Posford Speaks Out About Psychedelics & Music" by David Jay Brown.

Author David Jay Brown shares this fascinating interview with Simon Posford of Shpongle, whose spiritually-inspired rhythms are immensely popular in the electronic dance community. Posford describes how psychedelics and psychedelic culture have played a powerful role in shaping his music and his perspective on science, consciousness, and politics.

The complete interview with Posford will appear in the Spring 2012 Special Edition of the MAPS Bulletin.


  Mind Hacks "Ecstasy for war trauma: a flashback to earlier treatments" by Vaughan Bell.

The popular neuroscience blog Mind Hacks explains how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy is the latest in a long line of psychological treatments for PTSD. The post describes how the most effective treatments for PTSD require patients to revisit their traumatic memories and overcome the chronic fear and anxiety that accompany those memories. As Mind Hacks points out, many patients struggle to overcome their fear of traumatic memories and require additional assistance. MDMA-assisted psychotherapy may be just what these treatment-resistant patients need. (Note: While the post correctly points out that MDMA can help reduce certain forms of anxiety, it is not a traditional anti-anxiety drug. In the context of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, MDMA is used to open patients up to the trauma rather than to help them avoid it.)



August 18, 2011


  BBC Health "Modified ecstasy ‘attacks blood cancers’" by James Gallaghert.

Researchers at the University of Birmingham have found that modified, non-psychoactive forms of MDMA could destroy certain kinds of blood cancer cells, including leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma. Neither this article nor the researchers themselves foresee modified MDMA becoming a viable treatment for humans any time soon, but the discovery nevertheless indicates a promising future for research into the medical benefits of MDMA and its chemical cousins.



August 16, 2011


  Motherboard Magazine "The Agony and the Ecstasy: The Quiet Mission to Fight PTSD With Psychedelic Drugs" by Brian Anderson.

Motherboard Magazine shares an in-depth and original feature story on MAPS’ MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research. Including intimate portraits of co-therapists and Clinical Investigators Michael Mithoefer, M.D., and Annie Mithoefer, B.S.N., a well-researched summary of why conventional PTSD treatments often fail, and a clear summary of how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy might work, this article is a fascinating read.

Despite its overall accuracy, the article does make two misleading claims. First, the model of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy used by MAPS’ researchers does not involve forcing the trauma to surface. In fact, patients undergoing MDMA-assisted psychotherapy are almost always willing to work through their trauma. This is why MDMA-assisted psychotherapy could be so effective: In the context of treatment, patients may be more willing to explore their traumatic memories than they ever have been previously.

Second, neither MAPS nor MAPS Founder and Executive Director Rick Doblin, Ph.D., are seeking to make MDMA available “at the corner drug store.” MDMA-assisted psychotherapy involves administering MDMA once or several times in a carefully controlled environment under the guidance of a trained medical or therapeutic professional.



July 25, 2011


  Fox News "Could Natural Treatments Have Helped Amy Winehouse?" by Chris Kilham.

Even the most conservative news outlets are beginning to recognize that despite (or perhaps because of) their controversial history, psychedelics are gaining prominence as possible treatments for serious medical conditions. An article on Fox News reveals that some psychedelic substances have “unquestionable promise” in the treatment of addiction, especially when combined with other treatments such as therapy and exercise. As timely as it is notable, this article appeared while MAPS Canada was conducting its study of ayahuasca-assisted therapy for addiction in Vancouver.



July 24, 2011


  Maine Morning Sentinel "For Wounded Veteran, Medical Marijuana’s Been a Godsend" by Michael Shepherd.

Veterans are speaking out about the urgent need for research into the therapeutic benefits of marijuana just as MAPS awaits word from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services about whether the agency will allow us to proceed with our planned, FDA-approved study of marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in veterans of war. In this article, Sgt. Ryan Begin tells the story of how marijuana helps him cope with the psychological and physical pain of combat-related trauma, and explains why making it available for him and his fellow soldiers should be one of our highest national priorities.


  In the Mind Field "Marijuana and PTSD: Give the Joy of Life a Chance" by John Grant.

Writer and veteran John Grant explains why MAPS’ planned study of marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in war veterans is nothing to laugh about. According to Grant, the possibility—recognized by countless veterans and medical marijuana users—that marijuana could help soldiers overcome the psychological, emotional, and spiritual trauma of war should be taken seriously, and it’s time for our culture to let go of its nearly century-old phobia of marijuana as a medicine. As the article points out, “a little sanity in this area can go a long way” to helping our soldiers return to a healthy life.



July 22, 2011


  Reason Magazine "Scientific Evidence Clearly Shows That Ecstasy Is Only 200 Times As Bad As Pot" by Jacob Sullum.

Reason Magazine reports on how MAPS and the ACLU used scientific evidence to successfully challenge harsh federal Ecstasy sentencing guidelines.



July 19, 2011


  International Business Times "Marijuana Legalization Coming Soon?" by International Business Times.

MAPS’ proposed study of marijuana for PTSD in veterans of war could do more than help develop a more effective treatment for symptoms of PTSD—it could also change how state and federal policymakers think about the medical value of whole-plant marijuana. According to the International Business Times, the proposed study (which is awaiting secondary approval from the Department of Health and Human Services even though it has already passed FDA review) could provide yet more evidence that the federal government should recognize the medical potential of marijuana and allow the research to take place.


  International Business Times "Groups Push for Medical Marijuana Treatment for Veterans Suffering from PTSD" by International Business Times.

While MAPS waits for the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Public Health Service to decide whether to allow us to purchase marijuana for our planned study of marijuana for veterans with PTSD, the International Business Times wonders whether the agencies will recognize the pressing need for research into effective PTSD treatments.



July 18, 2011


  PR Newswire "MAPS, ACLU Persuade Federal Judge to Use Science to Challenge Harsh Ecstasy Sentencing Guidelines" by MAPS.

The ACLU recently won a major victory in a legal case challenging the federal sentencing guidelines for Ecstasy-related crimes as having been made in a time of irrational panic over the dangers of the drug. On July 15, a defendant charged with distributing Ecstasy was sentenced to 26 months in prison—less than half the time recommended by current sentencing guidelines. MAPS contributed to the victory by testifying about the current state of evidence about the risks of recreational Ecstasy use, which have recently been discovered to be significantly lower than previously believed. The outcome of the trial indicates that the science of psychedelics can have real, positive implications for health, policy, and human rights.

The press release was picked up by numerous media outlets, including the Herald Online, Bradenton.com, The Sacramento Bee, StoptheDrugWar.org, and more.


  The New York Times "Marijuana May Be Studied for Combat Disorder" by Dan Frosch.

The New York Times explains how MAPS’ proposed study of marijuana for PTSD in veterans of war could help show the federal government what veterans groups and medical marijuana advocates have known for years: that marijuana could help soldiers cope with the psychological wounds of war. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has already decided to let the study proceed, but the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the Public Health Service (PHS) must still approve the study before they allow MAPS to purchase the marijuana required for the study. In the past, these agencies have refused to supply MAPS with marijuana for its studies, preventing them from taking place. Perhaps now, with enough recognition of the pressing need for better treatments for PTSD in veterans and enough pressure on the NIDA/PHS to change their tune, the agency will allow the study to proceed and finally put patients’ needs first.

Additional stories about the promise of MAPS’ research for veterans and their families appeared in the military magazine Stars and Stripes, at USNavySeals.com, and as a top headline at the Partnership for a Drug-Free America.



July 6, 2011


  Acceler8or "Transcending the Medical Frontiers: Exploring the Future of Psychedelic Drug Research" by David Jay Brown.

The resurgence of government-approved research into psychedelics has uncovered some surprising potential uses for these powerful substances, from helping people overcome trauma, anxiety, and addiction to facilitating extraordinary artistic, personal, and spiritual growth. Here, award-winning author and MAPS Bulletin guest editor David Jay Brown presents a thorough overview of the (often surprising) uses for which psychedelics are currently being explored.



July 5, 2011


  Sam Harris Blog "Drugs and the Meaning of Life" by Sam Harris.

In this bold and personal post, author Sam Harris reflects on psychedelics as tools for psychological healing, scientific exploration, and spiritual growth. He acknowledges that because they are such powerful tools, they require an extra level of care and responsibility when dealing with them. Although the studies that Harris cites regarding MDMA’s neurotoxic potential have been called into question, the honesty and directness with which he writes make this essay a worthwhile read.



June 30, 2011


  Santa Cruz Patch "Mom Shares Psychedelic Drugs with Dying Daughter" by David Jay Brown.

In his most recent column, award-winning writer David Jay Brown praises Honor Thy Daughter, Marilyn Howell’s new memoir about her experience seeking out underground psychedelic therapy for her daughter suffering from colon cancer. True stories like this are reminders of the urgent need for research into the real risks and benefits of psychedelic therapy.



June 28, 2011


  Ralph Metzner's Blog "MDMA Recognized as Most Promising Treatment of PTSD" by Ralph Metzner, Ph.D..

Psychologist and veteran psychedelic researcher Ralph Metzner, Ph.D., who worked with TImothy Leary and Richard Alpert on the original Harvard Psilocybin Project has a few things to say about the status of MDMA research. In this blog post, Metzner writes about why MDMA is such a promising treatment for PTSD, how it’s both similar to and different from the other “classical” psychedelics like LSD and psilocybin, and how MAPS’ research are paving the way for a new era of mainstream psychedelic science.



June 27, 2011


  ScienceNOW "LSD Alleviates “Suicide Headaches”" by Kai Kupferschmidt.

A recent pilot study by Harvard psychiatrist John Halpern, M.D., showed that 2-bromo-LSD (a non-psychoactive version of LSD) could give profound and long-lasting relief to patients suffering from the chronic, debilitating syndrome known as cluster headaches. While what causes these headaches and how 2-bromo-LSD could reduce their frequency is still uncertain, these results are a clear indication that more research is warranted.

Additional media coverage of Halpern’s cluster headache study can be found here and here.

Halpern also recently completed another study showing that long-term Ecstasy use was not associated with cognitive damage.



June 24, 2011


  AlterNet "Why Prescription Ecstasy or LSD Could Happen Much Sooner Than You Think" by Anneli Rufus.

A lead story on AlterNet reports that psychedelic research is booming, and that prescription psychedelics could be legally available within a decade. But the return of psychedelics to mainstream medicine is doing much more than developing much-needed new treatments for pain, anxiety, and trauma. It’s also showing what can happen when scientists and regulators move beyond the simplistic distinction between “good drugs” and “bad drugs” and instead take an honest look at the risks and benefits of these substances for specific conditions. As the article points out, “it’s about using cutting-edge technology to prove what millions around the world have been saying for thousands of years: This stuff gets to your head.”

The same story also appeared in the addiction treatment magazine The Fix.



June 23, 2011


  The Economist "Acid Tests" by The Economist.

The near-completion of MAPS’ Swiss study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy for end-of-life anxiety is a chance to take note of the resurgence of psychedelic research after decades of taboo. This article describes the long history of psychedelic psychotherapy, the explosion of recreational use leading to the shutting down of psychedelic research, and the recent return of these substances to mainstream science and medicine. The recent publication of Timothy Leary’s archives indicates the world is ready to move beyond its old fear of psychedelics and to once again take an honest, rational look at their risks and benefits for psychological, emotional, and spiritual health.



June 20, 2011


  Religion Dispatches "High on Drugs: Breaking the Just Say No Addiction" by Gary Laderman.

Emory University Professor Gary Laderman sees the recent Global Commission on Drug Policy report calling for an end to the international war on drugs as a chance to explore some alternative roles for drugs in our society. Research is now showing that psychedelics, when used in the right setting, can be used for both psychological health and spiritual development, and Laderman thinks this new knowledge could challenge the logic underlying current drug policies.



June 17, 2011


  EmaxHealth "Hopkins Researchers Study Therapeutic Use of Psilocybin in Magic Mushrooms" by Kathleen Blanchard.

In a recently published study at Johns Hopkins Medical School, researchers found that psilocybin-induced spiritual experiences could have long-lasting positive effects on emotional health, social relationships, and spiritual practice. The goal of the study was to determine the appropriate dose of psilocybin for producing positive changes while avoiding negative experiences or “bad trips.” MAPS Founder and Executive Director Rick Doblin, Ph.D., also comments on the study in this article.



June 16, 2011


  TIME "“Magic Mushrooms” Can Improve Psychological Health Long Term" by Maia Szalavitz.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine have completed a study showing that psilocybin-induced spiritual experiences can have real, positive effects on emotional and psychological health. Could this new evidence cause a broader conception of the possible place of psychedelics in society? Could it be telling scientists something about the biology of spirituality? Also see here and here for additional coverage of the Johns Hopkins study.



June 10, 2011


  The Hindu "My Husband and Other Animals - One Last Trip" by Janaki Lenin.

Travel and adventure writer Kenneth Anderson had one last wish: to learn whether LSD could help him come to terms with his imminent death. In this short recollection, an acquaintance remembers Anderson having an “incredible experience” that left him feeling calm, alert, and at peace.


  AlterNet "Ecstasy As Treatment for PTSD from Sexual Trauma and War? New Research Shows Very Promising Results" by Scott Thill.

With health care costs for veterans rising dramatically and effective treatments limited, researchers and therapists are reaching out to find new ways of treating trauma. As this in-depth and well-researched article explains, MAPS is at the center of multiple attempts to develop safe and effective treatments for trauma associated with sexual assault and war. MDMA-assisted psychotherapy is being shown to be effective for treating trauma in individuals whose illness has been resistant to other forms of treatment. Even MAPS’ planned medical marijuana study, which was recently approved by the FDA, represents a potential breakthrough in treatments for PTSD—as long as public and governmental attitudes to these innovative treatment continue to improve.

Note: MDMA is not Ecstasy. Substances sold on the street under the name Ecstasy do often contain MDMA, but frequently also contain ketamine, caffeine, BZP, and other narcotics and stimulants. In laboratory studies, pure MDMA—but not Ecstasy—has been proven sufficiently safe for human consumption when taken a limited number of times in moderate doses.



June 9, 2011


  The Raw Story "First Therapeutic Study of LSD in 35 Years Finishes Treatment of Last Subject" by Eric W. Dolan.

A letter from Swiss psychiatrist Peter Gasser, M.D., the lead investigator for MAPS’ study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy for anxiety associated with life-threatening illness, reports that all 12 participants in the study reported benefits from the treatment. Even though the number of subjects enrolled in the study was small, meaning that achieving statistically significant results could be a challenge, the study will show that LSD can be safely used in a therapeutic setting, setting the stage for future studies of medical applications of LSD.



June 7, 2011


  CommonHealth "Mother’s Loving Care For Dying Daughter Included Psychedelic Drugs" by Carey Goldberg, Jessica Alpert.

On June 7, Honor Thy Daughter author Marilyn Howell appeared on RadioBoston’s CommonHealth to discuss why she turned to psychedelic therapy to ease the pain and anxiety of her dying daughter. This article explains how Howell’s story fits into the larger history of psychedelic medicine, and how stories like hers are helping show the world the importance of MAPS’ research.

Listen to Howell’s interview streaming or download it here.

RadioBoston also published a second short article about Howell’s decision to explore psychedelic therapy.



June 5, 2011


  American Botanical Council "FDA Accepts Protocol for Study on Marijuana and PTSD" by Lindsey Stafford.

The latest edition of the American Botanical Council’s quarterly peer-reviewed journal HerbalGram (Volume 8, Number 6, June 2011) contains a thorough and well-researched article on the FDA’s April 28 approval of MAPS’ planned study of smoked and/or vaporized marijuana for PTSD in veterans of war. The article presents a nuanced summary of the background, rationale, design, and outlook for what could become the first controlled clinical trial of the therapeutic potential of marijuana for PTSD. “I wasn’t surprised with FDA’s favorable review since I have come over the last two decades to respect the FDA’s willingness to put science over politics,” explains MAPS Founder and Executive Director Rick Doblin, Ph.D. “Still, it’s breathtaking every time FDA gives us permission for a new precedent.” Now that the FDA has given the study its stamp of approval, it now falls to the National Institute on Drug Abuse/Public Health Service to decide whether to allow us to purchase the marijuana we need for the study.



June 3, 2011


  Daily Mail Online (UK) "The Mother Who Gave Her Terminally Ill Daughter Ecstasy to Ease Her Suffering" by Daily Mail.

UK newspaper The Daily Mail announces the release of Honor Thy Daughter, Marilyn Howell’s new memoir about how psychedelic therapy helped her daughter cope with the pain and anxiety of terminal colon cancer. (Note that the title of the article is technically incorrect: Howell’s daughter received pure MDMA, not Ecstasy. Ecstasy is a recreational drug that may or may not contain MDMA. All of MAPS’ clinical studies use MDMA, not Ecstasy.)



June 2, 2011


  The Fix "Feds Approve First LSD Study Since ‘72" by Dirk Hanson.

Based on David Jay Brown’s May 27 article announcing the near-completion of MAPS’ landmark Swiss study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy for end-of-life anxiety, this article explains the significance of the worldwide resurgence of psychedelic research.



June 1, 2011


   "Israeli Ministry of Health Approves MDMA/PTSD Study"

On June 1, 2011, Israel’s Ministry of Health approved our Israeli study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. This approval indicates that the Ministry was satisfied with our response to their April 28 request for additional information. Now that the study has the full approval of Israeli regulatory bodies, we have begun preparing to submit the protocol to the US FDA, which must prospectively approve the study before we can start enrolling subjects since it is being conducted under a US Investigational New Drug application. The study initiation will take place in approximately one month, during which time we will finalize the study insurance documents and contracts with the study site. Training materials containing the measures to be used in the study have been provided to the investigators and independent raters, and we continue working with clinical research organization Antaea Medical Services, Ltd., to prepare the remaining documents and forms.


   "Israeli Ministry of Health Approves MDMA/PTSD Study"

On June 1, 2011, Israel’s Ministry of Health approved our Israeli study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. This approval indicates that the Ministry was satisfied with our response to their April 28 request for additional information. Now that the study has the full approval of Israeli regulatory bodies, we have begun preparing to submit the protocol to the US FDA, which must prospectively approve the study before we can start enrolling subjects since it is being conducted under a US Investigational New Drug application. The study initiation will take place in approximately one month, during which time we will finalize the study insurance documents and contracts with the study site. Training materials containing the measures to be used in the study have been provided to the investigators and independent raters, and we continue working with clinical research organization Antaea Medical Services, Ltd., to prepare the remaining documents and forms.



May 27, 2011


  Santa Cruz Patch "Landmark Clinical LSD Study Nears Completion" by David Jay Brown.

Award-winning author David Jay Brown uses the approaching completion of MAPS’ Swiss study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy for anxiety associated with life-threatening illness to explore the complex and controversial history of worldwide LSD research. As the first clinical LSD study in over 25 years, the completion of this study represents a monumental achievement for psychedelic science.


  Chemistry and Biology "Mixed Signals: Cannabinoid System Offers New Therapeutic Possibilities As Well As Challenges" by Chandra Shekhar.

The most recent edition of Chemistry and Biology (Volume 18, Issue 5, May 2011) includes a feature article by Chandra Shekhar entitled “Mixed Signals: Cannabinoid System Offers New Therapeutic Possibilities As Well As Challenges” on the history, promise, and challenge of medical marijuana research. The article briefly outlines the history of cannabis research, and explains how the marijuana plant has been the key to one of the most significant medical discoveries of the last century: the endocannabinoid system. While private companies and government agencies have invested a great deal in developing medicines based on isolated and synthetic versions of the active chemicals in the marijuana plant, research on the safety and effectiveness of the marijuana plant itself still lags behind. The article explains how naturally-occurring cannabinoids help regulate some of the most important biological functions, and how modern researchers—including MAPS—are trying to learn which delivery systems and which cannabinoid combinations work best for which conditions.



May 25, 2011


  The Boston Channel "Psychedelic Drugs Help Daughter In Dying Days" by WCBV Boston.

The following article is a transcript of a stirring 3-minute segment on WCBV’s Health News about why Honor Thy Daughter author Marilyn Howell, Ed.D., chose to seek out psychedelic therapy for her daughter with terminal cancer. It also shows how mainstream medical practitioners are beginning to recognize the potential value of such treatments for patients at the end of their life, emphasizing the need for more research into the safety and effectiveness of MDMA and other psychedelics.



May 23, 2011


  Courthouse News Service "Ecstasy Has Same Legal Penalties as Cocaine" by Adam Klasfeld.

On May 19, 2011, a US District Judge ruled that Ecstasy-related crimes are punished far more harshly than is justified by currently available scientific evidence about the risks of the drug. In 2001, the US Sentencing Commission enacted a set of guidelines requiring judges to punish Ecstasy violations 500 times more severely than marijuana. The American Civil Liberties Union challenged that standard as unfair and requested that the judge undertake a rational reconsideration of the guidelines.

The ruling sharply criticizes the commission’s “opportunistic rummaging” and “selective and incomplete” analysis of the scientific data that led to the creation of the guidelines, and took into account new evidence—including data from a recent study by Harvard psychiatrist John Halpern, M.D., showing that long-term recreational Ecstasy use did not cause cognitive damage. MAPS also consulted on the case.

According to Jay Rorty, director of the ACLU’s Criminal Drug Law Reform Project, the ruling is a step in the right direction. “It’s also important because it demonstrates a district judge’s willingness to undertake a thorough review of the empirical basis underlying the guideline to update a guideline based on scientific advances,” he said.

Note: All of MAPS’ clinical research studies use pure MDMA that was manufactured in a government-licensed facility. Drugs bought and sold on the street as “Ecstasy” may or may not contain MDMA.



May 19, 2011


  SFGate.com "Can Psychedelic Therapy Ease the Suffering of Cancer Patients?" by PRWeb.

SFGate.com shares this press release announcing the publication of Honor Thy Daughter by Marilyn Howell, Ed.D. In the newest book from the MAPS Press, Howell tells the story of her family’s search for physical, emotional, and spiritual healing as her daughter struggles with terminal cancer. Their journey ultimately takes them into the hands of an anonymous therapist who offers the family hope and healing through psychedelic psychotherapy.

The original press release is also available.



May 17, 2011


  AlterNet "How Christopher Hitchens Could Help His Fellow Cancer Patients by Promoting Psychedelic Therapy" by Alexander Zaitchik.

World-renowned author and journalist Christopher Hitchens, who recently announced that he has lost his voice to throat cancer, is an outspoken advocate of experimental cancer treatments. This article discusses pioneering research into psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy for anxiety associated with terminal illnesses, including the research that MAPS is currently conducting on the risks and benefits of LSD-assisted psychotherapy. The article uses Hitchens’ case as an example of why research into the healing potential of psychedelic therapy is so important.

MAPS Founder and Executive Director Rick Doblin, Ph.D., points out that while MAPS’ research is intended to help people like Hitchens get safe and effective access to these treatments, it remains just out of reach. “People all over the world should have access to psychedelic therapy and psychedelic hospice centers, but the options are stigmatized and criminalized,” Doblin says. “If Hitchens—a curious man with a lot of intellectual power and influence—were to participate in an underground program, he could consider it an act of civil disobedience on behalf of science in the face of stigma and bad law.” The article concludes by echoing the growing recognition that developing safe, legal contexts for psychedelic therapy could help many—perhaps millions—of cancer patients.



May 16, 2011


  Lafayette Online "Ethical Dilemmas of Pharmaceutical Research" by Philip Fiorini.

An upcoming talk (to take place Thursday, May 19, in Lafayette, IN) sponsored in part by Purdue University will feature renowned pharmacologist and psychedelic researcher David Nichols, Ph.D. Nichols has studied how psychedelic drugs work in the brain for over 40 years, and his research is an excellent example of how psychedelics aren’t just therapeutic tools but also powerful technologies for discovering the fundamentals of the human mind.



May 13, 2011


  Santa Cruz Patch "FDA Approves New PTSD Study with Medical Marijuana" by David Jay Brown.

Columnist and MAPS Bulletin guest editor David Jay Brown summarizes what’s in store for medical marijuana research now that the FDA has approved MAPS’ planned study of marijuana for veterans with PTSD. The National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Drug Enforcement Administration have a history of preventing FDA-approved research from moving forward, but we’re trying to be optimistic that they’ll recognize the pressing need for this research and change their tune.



May 11, 2011


  East Bay Express "Pot for PTSD Gets FDA Go-Ahead" by David Downs.

The FDA has approved MAPS’ study of marijuana for veterans for PTSD, but the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s continued insistence that marijuana is not a medicine (despite medical marijuana being legal in almost a third of the country) might prevent the study from ever happening. This well-researched article aptly summarizes the challenges faced by scientists wanting to do research on whole-plant marijuana.


  Organic Authority "FDA Study Approval Brings Marijuana One Step Closer to Treating PTSD" by Jill Ettinger.

The Organic Authority blog explains how the FDA’s recent approval of MAPS’ proposed study of marijuana for veterans with PTSD is a huge step forward for medical marijuana research.



May 10, 2011


  LA Weekly "Marijuana Research Involving War Veterans and Post-Traumatic Stress Approved by Feds, Sort Of" by Dennis Romero.

Now that the FDA has approved our planned study of marijuana for veterans for PTSD, it’s up to the National Institute on Drug Abuse to decide whether to allow us to buy the marijuana we need to conduct it. Though Dennis Romero thinks that veterans should be allowed to use marijuana regardless of its effectiveness, it’s important to show federal agencies that the drug is both effective and safe before making it available as a prescription medicine.



May 6, 2011


  Psychiatric Times "Does MDMA Have a Role in Clinical Psychiatry?" by Michael Mithoefer, M.D..

Psychiatrist and MAPS Clinical Investigator Michael Mithoefer, M.D., published this article in Psychiatric Times about the current state of research into the therapeutic potential of MDMA. He describes the history of MDMA’s use in psychiatry, the most recent results from MAPS’ studies of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD, the risks and benefits of MDMA for therapy, and the mechanisms by which MDMA is believed to help people confront trauma and overcome anxiety. Dr. Mithoefer’s extensive experience administering MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to PTSD sufferers suggests to him that “MDMA may find an important place in the future of psychopharmacology.”



May 5, 2011


  Salem-News.com "Cannabis Gives Hope to Warriors with PTSD" by Bonnie King.

Thousands of veterans already use marijuana to treat PTSD symptoms such as anxiety and insomnia, emphasizing the pressing need for research into the safety and effectiveness of different strains and delivery methods. Having received FDA approval for our planned study of marijuana for PTSD in veterans, MAPS is now waiting to find out whether the National Institute on Drug Abuse/Public Health Service will allow us to purchase the marijuana we need for the study.


  Marijuana Business Report "FDA Approves Study of Cannabis for PTSD"

On April 28, the FDA approved MAPS’ planned study of smoked or vaporized marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in war veterans, marking the first time a government agency has approved an outpatient marijuana study. The Marijuana Business Report reflects on the implications of this development of medical marijuana research in the U.S.


  Miller-McCune "Researchers Re-Open Their Minds to Psychedelic Drugs" by Sam Kornell.

This article describes how psychedelic research has quickly expanded in the last ten years, and how researchers and scientists at major universities are reminding the world that there is much more to psychedelics than hallucinations. After decades of being lost in the shadows of the drug war, studies being conducted at UCLA, Johns Hopkins, NYU, and Harvard are once again showing that psychedelics like psilocybin and MDMA may actually have profound therapeutic effects—and people are beginning to notice.



May 3, 2011


  ScienceDaily "Ecstasy Associated With Chronic Change in Brain Function" by ScienceDaily.

A recent study by a Vanderbilt psychiatrist finds long-term differences in brain function between recreational Ecstasy users and non-users. This ScienceDaily article wonders whether these possible risks extend to those who are administered MDMA in therapeutic contexts.

The researchers performed fMRI scans on 20 ecstasy users, men and women reporting a lifetime of 33.25 +/- 37.79 occasions of use on average, range = 3-155), and 20 non-user controls. Generally speaking, a greater number of ecstasy users had experience with nearly every other substance listed, except alcohol, and including cannabis, stimulants, psychedelics, sedatives, opiates. The researchers imaged the brain while people watched either red or blue light, shown at three levels of brightness, and then measured brain activation. The researchers found no significant difference in brain activation between ecstasy user and non-ecstasy user controls. the researchers then correlated lifetime exposure to ecstasy to brain activation, finding a relationship between lifetime exposure and degree of cortical excitability in primary visual cortex, an area of brain involved in visual processing. The researchers also split the sample of ecstasy users on the basis of median (the value in the exact middle of the sample) lifetime ecstasy use, finding greater excitability in “heavy” versus “light” ecstasy users. Though adding lifetime exposure to methamphetamine slightly lowered the strength of this relationship between lifetime drug use and cortical excitability overall, it increased the strength of relationship in specific areas, suggesting a role of methamphetamine use. The researchers do not cite any relationship between cortical excitability in this area and any type of dementia. Instead, they discuss its relationship with neurons that receive input from the serotonin system.

The same team of researchers first reported increased activation in the visual cortex in 2006 (Cowan et al. 2006).

The sole paper that attempts to address the effects age and ecstasy use examined cognitive function in people aged 39-55 reporting repeated ecstasy use and comparing them with polydrug users, including some light ecstasy users (Schilt et al. 2010). This report reported that older ecstasy users and younger ecstasy users (from another study) had similar test scores.

As ScienceDaily puts it, “The message in news reports needs to be accurate.” Misleadingly, neither Cowan nor ScienceDaily acknowledge that illegally purchased Ecstasy used recreationally may or may not contain MDMA, and often contains methamphetamine, ketamine, BZP, caffeine, or other narcotics and stimulants. Besides, there is no reason to assume that the effects of regular recreational Ecstasy use—even if it was just MDMA—extend to those of MDMA administered only a few times in therapeutic settings. The article also fails to point out that users of Ecstasy also tend to use other drugs as well. In other words, there’s no way to know whether the observed effects were due to Ecstasy, to another drug, or to something else entirely.

Journalists reporting on scientific results need to be careful not to overstate their implications. It is important to be cautious when taking any drug repeatedly, but there is a big difference between acknowledging long-term changes in brain function after using a substance and claiming that those changes are harmful. The scientist quoted in the article implies that because both long-term Ecstasy users and Alzheimer’s patients experience changes in brain function, somehow Ecstasy use causes Alzheimers. This is so misleading as to be dishonest; people have been using Ecstasy recreationally for over 30 years, and not a single study has shown a link between long-term recreational Ecstasy use and Alzheimer’s. To claim that there is a link is pure conjecture.

And there are reasons to believe that the benefits of MDMA used in therapy may outweigh its risks. According to MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin, Ph.D., “The dosing [of MDMA] MAPS is using doesn’t cause any negative functional consequences in neurocognitive tests. There have been no reports of persisting problems in brain function or mood in any of our US PTSD subjects after an average of 41 months.”



May 2, 2011


  The New York Times "Tugging at Threads to Unspool Stories of Torture" by Denise Grady.

On Monday, May 2, The New York Times published a major story about Iraqi refugees in Jordan with PTSD. Iraqi refugees are some of the people we are anticipating will be subjects in our Jordanian study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD once it’s finally approved by the Jordanian FDA, which seems likely to be soon. Sadly, it seems that there will be no shortage of subjects for our 12-person Jordanian study. In our US MDMA/PTSD study, we’re working with US veterans with war-related PTSD from either Iraq, Afghanistan, or Vietnam. We’ve already enrolled 4 subjects so far in this study, all from service in Iraq and/or Afghanistan. MAPS is working toward the day when MDMA-assisted psychotheray will be widely available to help treat people around the world with PTSD.

According to UK psychiatrist Ben Sessa, M.D., “[This story] illustrates how trauma—and particularly the trauma of war and conflict—has no international borders or political persuasions. In an analogous fashion MDMA is a substance that bridges the gap between psychopharmacology and psychotherapy like no other treatment we know as psychiatrists, a truly innovative new direction for mental health that we all hope can offer a significant breakthrough for the future management of PTSD.” Sessa is working with MAPS to acquire funding for a possible UK-based study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD.



April 30, 2011


  Treating Yourself, via Capital City Caregivers "Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Medical Cannabis" by Capital City Caregivers.

A blog post from a Lansing, MI, medical marijuana clinic points to an account (PDF) in Treating Yourself magazine by a soldier who finds that medical marijuana helps him cope with PTSD symptoms. While physicians at the Veterans Administration and other treatment centers continue to pour ineffective pills down the throats of suffering soldiers, thousands of veterans are finding that marijuana genuinely helps them. MAPS’ planned study of the risks and benefits of marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in war veterans has provisionally passed the FDA review process, but it remains to be seen whether the federal government will allow us to purchase the marijuana we need for the study.



April 21, 2011


  Public Library of Science Blogs "The Plot to Turn On the World: The Leary/Ginsberg Acid Conspiracy" by Steve Silberman.

In the 1960s, Harvard psychologist Timothy Leary teamed up with revolutionary Beat poet Allen Ginsberg to promote a vision of a world “turned on” by LSD and other psychedelics. In his new book about Leary and Ginsberg’s White Hand Society, Peter Conners describes how the duo’s desire to dose the planet changed how the world thought about psychedelics. Conners admits that Leary and Ginsberg’s overenthusiastic embrace of psychedelics as a cure to all of society’s ills likely led to the crackdown on legitimate psychedelic research, but also points out that thanks to the work of MAPS, the world is starting to remember what a cautious, rational approach to psychedelic medicine looks like.


  Brain Blogger "Headache Treatment: Alternative or Illicit?" by Jennifer Gibson, PharmD.

LSD and psilocybin, both of which are psychedelic drugs that operate primarily on the serotonin system, are beginning to enter the public consciousness as possible treatments for certain kinds of chronic, debilitating headaches. Clinical pharmacist Jennifer Gibson points to increasing frustration with traditional medical treatments for cluster headaches and similar conditions, the high number of side effects associate with traditional treatments, and patients’ desire to choose their own treatments as the primary reason that psychedelics are gaining acceptance as medicines. Gibson concludes the article by calling for more and larger studies of the clinical benefits of psychedelics.



April 20, 2011


  The West Australian "Party Drug Hope for Parkinson’s" by Cathy O'Leary.

Researchers at the University of Western Australia are studying whether modified versions of MDMA could help increase the effectiveness (and possible help decrease the side-effects) of certain pharmaceutical treatments for Parkinson’s disease. Other scientists suspect that MDMA analogues could help treat a rare form of cancer. The possible value of MDMA itself as an adjunct to psychotherapy, of course, is already gaining widespread recognition. It’s clear that MDMA research holds a great deal of promise, and the only way to know what it can and cannot do for patients with a variety of illnesses is to make sure that funding for the research continues.



April 18, 2011


  Wired "The Cost of Combat Stress: A Billion Dollars a Year" by Madhumita Venkataramanan.

A new report from the National Bureau of Economic Research estimates that the economic and health care costs of mental health problems stemming from combat could be over $1 billion a year. Even more startlingly, Wired magazine reports that more than 6,000 veterans commit suicide every year. Posttraumatic stress is a national tragedy of epidemic proportions, yet there is a frightening lack of effective treatments for PTSD and other combat-related illnesses. Encouraging the federal government and the Veterans Administration to commit more resources to looking for more effective PTSD treatments, such as the possibility of treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, should therefore be an economic (as well as ethical) priority.



April 13, 2011


  Good Times Santa Cruz "Altered Statesman" by Damon Orion with David Jay Brown.

An inspirational and engaging interview with Santa Cruz writer and all-around psychedelic expert David Jay Brown appeared on the cover of this week’s edition of Good Times magazine. Here, Brown talks about his own research on brain stimulation, psychedelics, and altered states of consciousness; his thoughts on consciousness and death; his deep friendships with such historical figures as Timothy Leary and Robert Anton Wilson; and the past, present, and future of psychedelic research.


  ELLE "That Lovin’ Feeling" by Lauren Slater.

ELLE magazine reviews the origins of MDMA’s therapeutic uses in marriage and family therapy and specifically discusses MAPS’ role in helping psychedelic therapy return to mainstream medicine. The article includes an earnest and in-depth interview with MAPS Founder and Executive Director Rick Doblin, Ph.D., and discusses why—despite the possibility that MDMA-assisted therapy could help couples reestablish lost connections—MAPS has chosen to focus on helping individuals overcome their traumatic pasts.



April 12, 2011


  MAPS "Media Reports of Ecstasy and Brain Shrinkage Overblown" by L. Ilsa Jerome, Ph.D..

The results of a recent brain imaging study claiming an association between long-term recreational Ecstasy use and damage to the hippocampus (a deep brain region responsible for learning, memory, and other cognitive functions) has the media in a frenzy. Media outlets all over the world (such as Bloomberg Businessweek) leaped at the chance to interpret the study’s results as evidence that Ecstasy causes the brain to actually shrink. Some (like The Guardian) have even gone so far as to suggest that Ecstasy use is correlated with Alzheimer’s disease. One overenthusiastic writer at TopNews.us even claims that Ecstasy actually causes Alzheimer’s disease, despite the complete lack of supporting scientific evidence. By contrast, the results of a recent meticulously-designed government-funded study by Harvard University’s John Halpern, M.D., reporting no association between recreational Ecstasy use and cognitive damage, have been largely ignored by these media sources, which begs the question: Are journalists really doing their homework?

Thankfully, a little bit of careful attention to the actual science provides a powerful antidote to this kind of reckless reporting. MAPS Research and Information Specialist Ilsa Jerome, Ph.D., has written a quick and well-reasoned summary of the study’s results, and points out that despite the media frenzy, the study suffers from the usual shortcomings of most observational studies of recreational Ecstasy use, and should be taken with several milligrams of salt.



April 8, 2011


  NewScientist "Psychedelic Drug Cuts Brain Blood Flow and Connections" by Arran Frood.

By using psilocybin and other psychedelic compounds as scientific tools, neuroscientists are discovering some fascinating new properties of the human mind. A new brain imaging (fMRI) study by Robin Carhart-Harris at Imperial College London has found that the psychedelic or “mind-manifesting” effects of psilocybin could be due to the drug’s ability to decrease, rather than increase, activity in certain parts of the brain. Could this surprising effect have something to do with the therapeutic effects of psilocybin and other drugs that work on the serotonin system? Time—and research—will tell.



April 3, 2011


  The Observer (UK) "Ecstasy Case Not Yet Proven" by Professor Stephen Kish.

On March 27, 2010, Prof. Andrew Parrot (Swansea University) wrote a letter to the editor criticizing Prof. John Halpern’s (Harvard) recent study finding no association between heavy recreational Ecstasy use and cognitive damage. Below, Prof. Stephen Kish of the University of Toronto points out that in his rush to attack the study, Parrott actually misinterpreted the results of Kish’s own Ecstasy study, undermining Parrott’s critique. Debate may be important for the progress of science, but so is accuracy.



April 1, 2011


  Santa Cruz Patch "Vaporizing Cannabis: More Alternatives for Nonsmokers" by David Jay Brown.

Numerous studies have shown that vaporized marijuana is safer than smoked marijuana. That is exactly why MAPS has been trying (for nearly a decade) to end the federal government’s monopoly on the supply of marijuana for research. How else are we supposed to learn the safest way for patients to get the medicine they need?



March 27, 2011


  The Guardian (UK) "Letters to the Editor: Ecstasy Is Far from Harmless" by Professor Andrew C. Parrott.

What follows is a letter to the editor published on Sunday, March 27, 2011, in the Guardian, signed by abut 40 scientists all objecting to the findings of Dr. John Halpern’s paper in the journal Addiction, which found no association between long-term recreational Ecstasy use and cognitive damage. On April 3, Prof. Stephen Kish responded to the letter with one of his own.



March 25, 2011


  Medical News Today "Drug Report: MDMA, Ecstasy Still A Teen Choice; ER Visits Up 75%" by Sy Kraft.

On March 24, 2011, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA)‘s Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) released a report with the latest statistics for emergency department admissions in the U.S. involving Ecstasy. It’s clear that recreational Ecstasy use has increased in recent years, but that’s not how most mainstream media have interpreted the data. Unfortunately, most media sources (such as this CBS News article) have framed it as evidence for the dangers of recreational Ecstasy use. Those journalists taking the time to actually read the report (such as the author of the Medical News Today article listed below, which also mentions MAPS’ research on the therapeutic uses of MDMA) noticed that the vast majority (nearly 80%) of emergency department admissions involving Ecstasy also involved at least one other drug, and almost 40% of those over the age of 21 reported using three or more before being admitted. Was Ecstasy the cause of the admission, or was it the other drugs?

No drug, including Ecstasy or its principal component MDMA, is risk-free, but it’s important to be careful when reporting on scientific data.  It is frustrating for those committed to scientific honesty when journalists report on what they’re afraid of rather than what the research actually says.



March 22, 2011


  The Times (UK) "The Case for Prescribing Psychedelic Drugs" by Neil Boorman.

The Times reports on “Breaking Convention: A Multidisciplinary Conference on Psychedelic Consciousness,” which will take place on April 2-3, 2011, at the University of Kent at Canterbury. The conference will feature four symposia; several tracks of seminars, debates, workshops, and presentations; film screenings; video presentations; and a track devoted to ayahuasca research. The article describes how psychedelics are making a huge comeback in science and medicine, and addresses the importance of MAPS’ current research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. The article’s claim that MAPS’ research is hindered by the current legal status of MDMA, this is not actually the case: Because MDMA-assisted psychotherapy takes place in carefully controlled clinical contexts, our research has been able to move forward regardless of scheduling.



March 18, 2011


  The New York Times "Electric Kool-Aid Marketing Trip" by Michael Walker.

Augustus Owsley Stanley III, who died on March, 13, 2011, at the age of 76, had synthesized and sold over a million doses of LSD by 1967. This article discusses how Owsley almost single-handedly created the market for LSD and in so doing helped fuel the growth of the psychedelic culture.



March 17, 2011


  High Times Medical Marijuana Magazine "MAPS in High Times Medical Marijuana Magazine" by MAPS.

The last five issues of High Times Medical Marijuana Magazine have featured columns detailing MAPS’ latest efforts to get marijuana approved as a prescription medicine. The columns describe the latest news in our ongoing lawsuit against the DEA to end the federal government’s monopoly on the supply of marijuana for research, as well as updates about our proposed study of marijuana for the treatment of PTSD in war veterans.

Authors include MAPS Founder and Executive Director Rick Doblin, Ph.D., MAPS Director of Communications Brad Burge, M.A., Stephen Morseman, and Jonathan D. Roberts.

All previous columns are available for download as PDFs.

High Times Medical Marijuana Magazine is a quarterly publication containing the latest news and reviews about medical marijuana. From cultivation tips and strain reports to political updates and scientific research, the magazine is an excellent resource for anyone interested in medical marijuana culture, politics, and science.



March 16, 2011


  The New York Times "Heads Bowed in Grateful Memory" by Seth Schiesel.

On March 13, 2011, early LSD entrepreneur Owsley Stanley died in a car crash in his adopted home of Australia. Owsley was at the chemical, financial, and musical epicenter of the 1960s. This article discusses Owsley’s role in fueling the dramatic rise in popularity of the Grateful Dead and other icons of psychedelic culture.



March 9, 2011


  PR Newswire "UMass Professor Files Final DEA Brief in 10-Year Fight to End Government Marijuana Research Monopoly" by MAPS.

MAPS sent out this press release to correct an earlier AP wire service story (”UMass professor drops bid to grow medical pot,” March 4, 2011) that claimed that Professor Lyle Craker was giving up his attempts to break NIDA’s monopoly on marijuana for research. MAPS, Craker, and his lawyers at the ACLU have been trying to end that monopoly for nearly ten years in order to open the door for privately-funded medical marijuana research. On March 7, Craker’s lawyers filed their final brief in the case and are waiting to hear back from the DEA before deciding how to move forward.



March 8, 2011


  The Raw Story "ACLU: DEA’s Politics Are Keeping Cannabis-Based Medicines Off Shelves" by Stephen C. Webster.

This article reports on the lawsuit that MAPS, the ACLU, and Professor Lyle Craker have been fighting against the DEA for nearly ten years to break the federal government’s monopoly on the supply of marijuana for research. While many of the details are accurate—particularly the point that the DEA’s refusal to break the NIDA monopoly is keeping medicines out of the hands of patients—the article incorrectly claims that Craker and the ACLU are dropping the case. On March 7, Craker’s lawyers filed their final brief with the DEA, and are waiting to hear back from the DEA before deciding how to move forward.

The mistaken claims originated in an AP wire story (”UMass professor drops bid to grow medical pot,” March 4, 2011) but were corrected in a March 8 MAPS press release.


  Reason.com "ACLU on Obama’s Policy Regarding Medical Marijuana Research: Where’s Your Scientific Integrity Now?" by Jacob Sullum.

Reason.com corrects an AP article that erroneously reported that MAPS and Professor Lyle Craker were giving up their nearly ten-year fight with the DEA (”UMass professor drops bid to grow medical pot,” March 4, 2011) to break NIDA’s monopoly on the supply of marijuana for research. To the contrary, Craker’s lawyers filed their final brief in the case on March 8, 2011, and are now waiting to hear back from the DEA. MAPS also sent out its own press release to correct the AP story.



March 3, 2011


  Organic Authority "Healing with Ecstasy: MDMA and PTSD" by Jill Ettinger.

This article serves as an excellent introduction to the real history of the therapeutic and spiritual uses of psychedelics and marijuana, and connects it to MAPS’ present research.



March 2, 2011


  Uweekly.com "MDMA: Its Past, Present and Inscrutable Future" by Dyani Robarge.

The “unofficial newspaper” of Ohio State University shares with its reader the history of MAPS’ research on MDMA, and the differences between recreational and therapeutic use.


  The Baltimore Sun "Action, Not More Study, on Medical Marijuana" by Barry Considine.

This commentary is an excellent example of what happens when the government blocks medical marijuana research by holding on to its monopoly and refusing to sell marijuana to researchers. Frustrated by their inability to access marijuana for research in order demonstrate its safety and effectiveness for therapeutic use, patients and activists are forced to turn to anecdotal evidence and political posturing to make their claims for changes in medical marijuana law.



March 1, 2011


  The Dana Foundation "Psychedelic Drugs Show Promise as Therapy" by Tom Valeo.

The Dana Foundation reports on how advances in psychology and neuroscience are once again demonstrating the value of psychedelics as therapeutic tools. The article describes how MAPS’ studies of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy build on the most cutting-edge neurobiological research from around the world.



February 28, 2011


  The Daily Free Press "Evacuate the Dance Floor" by Kira Cole.

Boston University’s student newspaper reports on Dr. John Halpern’s latest study of the cognitive risks of Ecstasy, which found no association between heavy recreational use of the drug and damage to learning, memory, or strategic thinking. The author rightly points out that the results challenge decades of prior research, which have exaggerated the risks of the drug, and correctly identifies MDMA’s growing acceptance as a treatment for PTSD. However, she and her interviewees also make a number of glaring mistakes in their characterization of the drug and its effects, including: (1) Dr. Halpern’s study was not intended to explore the “medical uses” of Ecstasy; (2) the principle (and possibly erroneous) claims against Ecstasy have been linked to its potential cognitive, rather than neurological, damage; (3) MDMA, the ingredient commonly presumed to be the main component of illegally purchased Ecstasy, is actually quite different from existing prescription medicines both in its mechanism of action and in its mode of administration; and (4) there is actually very little scientific evidence for Ecstasy being an addictive drug. With new research on the risks and medical benefits of Ecstasy and MDMA emerging, it’s important that journalists get the science right, and that they take non-experts’ claims about the drug with several grains of salt.



February 24, 2011


  NewScientist "Is Lack of Sleep and Water Giving Ecstasy a Bad Name?" by NewScientist.

NewScientist summarizes the results of Dr. John Halpern’s latest study finding no evidence of a relationship between heavy recreational Ecstasy use and cognitive damage. While the study did not find a relationship, however, it’s important to emphasize that Ecstasy is not risk-free, and users still need to exercise caution and moderation in their use.



February 23, 2011


  TopWireNews "Study: Ecstasy Doesn’t Harm Mental Performance" by TopWireNews.

While this isn’t really an article, it’s a great example of what it looks like when journalists and commentators push science aside because it challenges their biases and beliefs. If careful, methodologically innovative research is “going to give many the people the wrong idea about ecstasy,” then where do the right ideas come from?



February 22, 2011


  National Health Service (UK) "Ecstasy Dangers “Unclear”" by NHS.

This article adeptly summarizes the purpose, methods, and results of Dr. John H. Halpern’s latest study of the risks of Ecstasy (which showed no evidence of cognitive damage associated with heavy recreational Ecstasy use). While it rightly acknowledges that “this research cannot confirm that Ecstasy is a safe drug,” it does make some glaring errors in its conclusions about the study’s significance. This entry contains both the original NHS article and Dr. Halpern’s careful and well-reasoned response.

 


  Fox 5 News Atlanta "Study: Ecstasy Does Not Harm Brain" by Canvas Staff.

Fox News Atlanta reports on the results of Dr. John Halpern’s latest study overturning years of faulty research into the cognitive risks of Ecstasy use. Dr. Halpern’s MAPS-supported, government-funded $1.8 million study showed that any cognitive risks involved in long-term Ecstasy use are more likely to be due to other factors than to the drug itself.



February 21, 2011


  Miami New Times "Study Claims Ecstasy Doesn’t Damage Brain (No Wonder Ultra Sold Out)" by Kyle Munzenrieder.

As a fine example of responsible science reporting, this article summarizes the results of Dr. John Halpern’s latest study finding no association between long-term Ecstasy use and damage to memory, problem-solving, or other cognitive skills. It appropriately points out that the results do not mean that Ecstasy use is always safe—to the contrary, there are a number of other risks associated with recreational Ecstasy use, and these risks need to be taken into consideration when individuals choose to use the drug. The research suggests, however, that these risks are unlikely to be due to the drug itself.



February 20, 2011


  The Huffington Post "No Brain Damage From Ecstasy, New Research Shows" by The Huffington Post.

Yet another major news source reports on the findings of Dr. John Halpern’s methodologically rigorous study finding no association between long-term recreational Ecstasy use and cognitive damage. The article rightly points out that despite these results, Ecstasy purchased on the street or in clubs is often not what it is represented to be, and users still need to exercise a great deal of caution when taking this drug (and others) in uncontrolled settings. Nevertheless, the study represents a giant leap forward in careful scientific studies of the real risks and benefits of Ecstasy, with the article pointing to MAPS’ ongoing research into the benefits of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD.



February 19, 2011


  The Guardian (UK) "Ecstasy Does Not Wreck the Mind, Study Claims" by Robin McKie.

Yet another international news media article, this time from the UK, summarizes the importance of Harvard University’s Dr. John Halpern’s methodologically innovative study showing no association between long-term Ecstasy use and cognitive damage. The paper summarizing Dr. Halpern’s study was published in Addiction in February 2011, and was based on pilot data collected with the assistance of MAPS.



February 18, 2011


  TIME "Ecstasy as Therapy: Have Some of its Negative Effects Been Overblown?" by Maia Szalavitz.

TIME magazine reports on the recent MAPS-supported Harvard study showing no link between heavy Ecstasy use and cognitive damage. The results of the study challenge decades of prior research, and remind us of the value of careful scientific investigation into both the benefits and the risks of psychedelics. As the article states: “The future of ecstasy seems promising.”



February 17, 2011


  Santa Cruz Sentinel "Ecstasy Study Questions Drug’s Longer-Term Effects" by Stephen Baxter.

The Santa Cruz Sentinel speaks with Dr. John Halpern of Harvard University/McLean Hospital, MAPS Communication and Education Associate Brad Burge, and local policymakers about the implications of Dr. Halpern’s new study of the risks of recreational Ecstasy use. After correcting for a number of methodological flaws in previous studies, Dr. Halpern and his team found that the cognitive risks of heavy, long-term Ecstasy are significantly less than previously believed, highlighting the need for a new series of careful investigations into the risks and benefits of the drug. The article also appeared in the San Jose Mercury News.


  Reason.com "NIDA-Funded Study Finds No Link Between MDMA and Cognitive Impairment" by Jacob Sullum.

Reason.com shares this blog post about Dr. John Halpern’s new MAPS-supported study finding no links between long-term Ecstasy use and cognitive damage. The author makes a great point about how the real risks of Ecstasy are at least partially (and possibly entirely) the result of irrational policies prohibiting its use. By pushing Ecstasy use underground and behind closed doors, the politics of prohibition make truly responsible use practically impossible.



February 16, 2011


  The Times of India "Ecstasy Use Does Not Decrease Mental Ability" by India Times.

Another international media outlet reports on the results of Dr. John Halpern’s latest study overturning years of faulty research into the cognitive risks of Ecstasy use. Dr. Halpern’s MAPS-supported, U.S. government-funded $1.8 million study showed that any cognitive risks involved in long-term Ecstasy use are more likely to be due to other factors than to the drug itself.



February 15, 2011


  AlterNet "The Puzzling Uproar Over One County’s Attempt to Educate People About Reducing Harm Risks from MDMA" by Julie Holland, M.D..

In this poignant opinion piece, psychiatrist, author, and MAPS associate Julie Holland, M.D., wonders why so many political leaders and journalists are taking issue with the Los Angeles Department of Public Health’s carefully considered decision to distribute informational fliers about the risks of using Ecstasy at raves. As Dr. Holland skillfully argues, people use Ecstasy regardless of laws prohibiting their use or cultural biases against illicit drugs in general—and distributing medically accurate information about the risks can only help.

Dr. Holland’s book, Ecstasy: The Complete Guide is available for purchase on the MAPS web store. All profits from sales of the book will go directly toward supporting MAPS’ psychedelic research and harm reduction services.


  O Magazine "Can a Single Pill Change Your Life?" by Jessica Winter.

In this thorough and well-balanced portrait, Sarah, who suffered from PTSD for twenty years as the result of severe childhood trauma, gives us a brutally honest look at her experience as a patient in MAPS’ groundbreaking study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. To see MDMA-assisted psychotherapy discussed so candidly and openly in such a prominent media source is to be reminded of the ever-broadening mainstream acceptance of psychedelics as medicines.

Also see O Magazine‘s “Inside the Investigation” interview with Jessica Winter for an account of how she first learned about MDMA-assisted psychotherapy.

Download the PDF.


  Addiction Journal "New Study Finds No Cognitive Impairment Among Ecstasy Users" by Addiction Journal.

A press release from the journal Addiction announces a groundbreaking new study by Harvard/McLean researcher John Halpern, M.D., and colleagues. The results of the study, which controlled for polydrug use among its subjects, call into question those of previous studies that linked recreational Ecstasy use and cognitive decline. MAPS provided both the concept for the research and $15,000 for the initial pilot study.