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MAPS Bulletin Spring 2014: Special Edition: Psychedelics and Education
 
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See below for up-to-date media articles about:
  • psychedelic and marijuana research
  • the politics of psychedelics and marijuana
  • other important news and information from around the world

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Archived Media Articles by Year

contract 2014 Media Articles...


August 19, 2014


  Fusion Live "Univ. of Arizona Terminates ‘Pot for PTSD’ Researcher" by Ryan Nerz.

Fusion Live interviews Dr. Sue Sisley about her planned study of medical marijuana for PTSD in veterans. Sisley speaks about the political climate surrounding marijuana research, her abrupt termination from the University of Arizona, and the importance of developing alternative treatments for PTSD through research with whole-plant marijuana. “Nobody is arguing that whole plant marijuana is a cure for PTSD, but it does seems to really reduce the severity of symptoms,” explains Sisley. “And many of our veterans are reporting that they have been able to successfully manage their PTSD symptoms and be able to be functional again.”



August 14, 2014


  Scientific American "Psychedelic Drugs Hold Medical Promise" by Roni Jacobson.

Scientific American writes about how the resurgence of research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics is helping scientists develop new treatments for PTSD, anxiety, depression, OCD, and addiction. Roni Jacobson of Scientific American declares that “Psychedelic drugs are poised to be the next major breakthrough in mental health care.” The article provides details about how the legal classification of psychedelics has hindered psychedelic research for decades, featuring perspective from MAPS and the Drug Policy Alliance about how psychedelic research can become more efficient by changing the way drugs are scheduled by the government.

Donate today to help make psychedelic therapy a legal treatment.



August 12, 2014


  Canada.com "Could MDMA Help Cure PTSD?" by Ashley Csanady.

Canada.com features an article about research into the therapeutic potential of MDMA, highlighting MAPS’ upcoming Canadian study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD. The article announces MAPS’ new Legalizing Psychedelic Therapy crowdfunding campaign, and interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about the potential public health benefits of increasing research into psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy to treat a variety of medical conditions. “There’s any number of lives that could have been saved if this was available previously,” Burge says. “We’d be 20 years advanced in our medical research and we could be using it in any number of ways.


  The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) "U. of Arizona Prof’s Marijuana Study Remains in Limbo" by Susan Kruth .

The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) reports on the current status of MAPS and Dr. Sue Sisley’s planned study of marijuana for PTSD, including an update about the continued controversy surrounding the University of Arizona’s decision to fire Sisley. The article reviews how political pressure influenced Sisley’s termination, and highlights mainstream media coverage of Sisley’s efforts to initiate marijuana research. “In short, UA’s actions are troubling—and are likely to be viewed by other professors as a signal that they should refrain from advocacy and research on controversial topics,” writes Susan Kruth of FIRE. “The allegations should be of great concern to those who value universities as places where innovative medical research can occur.”



August 11, 2014


  KJZZ "NAU Rejects Medical Marijuana Research Proposal" by Steve Shadley.

KJZZ reports on MAPS and Dr. Sue Sisley’s search for a new study location for our FDA-approved study of medical marijuana for PTSD, noting that Northern Arizona University has declined to host the study on their campus. The article explains the political situation surrounding Sisley’s termination from the University of Arizona. “Clearly all of these organizations in addition to these 100,000 people signing this petition and MAPS see Dr. Sisley as really the ideal investigator for the study and we’re not going to change the investigator simply because some conservative policy makers in Arizona decided they don’t like her political actions,”  says Brad Burge of MAPS.



August 9, 2014


  The New York Times "Medical Marijuana Research Hits Wall of U.S. Law" by Serge F. Kovaleski.

The New York Times reports on federal barriers to marijuana drug development research in the United States, focusing on MAPS and Dr. Sue Sisley’s efforts to initiate a clinical study of medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 70 U.S. veterans. The article explains the evolution of government restrictions on marijuana research, and notes that marijuana research has received prominent support from Congressional Representatives and over 100,000 people who signed a petition to support Sisley’s being rehired by the University of Arizona, after she was fired for political reasons.

Serge F. Kovaleski of The New York Times also investigates the political pressures behind Dr. Sisley’s firing from the University of Arizona: “The State Senate president, Andrew Biggs, called the university’s chief lobbyist, Tim Bee, to complain that Dr. Sisley seemed to be lobbying too aggressively and inappropriately. ‘Tim said he would call me back after he found out more,’ Mr. Biggs said in an interview. ‘And then he did and told me, “This will not be a problem going forward.” ’ ”

MAPS and Dr. Sisley have been working since 2010 to initiate a study of the safety and effectiveness of whole plant marijuana, smoked or vaporized, for symptoms of PTSD in 70 veterans. We are now seeking a new location for the study within Arizona.

Help clear the political haze obstructing research into the beneficial uses of Schedule I drugs.



August 5, 2014


  Arizona Daily Wildcat "Sisley Won’t Be Rehired At UA, PTSD Study Still on Hold" by Hannah Plotkin.

The Arizona Daily Wildcat investigates the developing situation surrounding marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley’s efforts to conduct an FDA-approved study of medical marijuana for PTSD in veterans in Arizona. The article details how the University of Arizona’s decision to terminate Sisley and deny her reinstatement appeal has inspired over 100,000 to sign a petition asking the Arizona Board of Regents to assist in the search for a new study location to conduct MAPS’ planned research. “With no more possibility for reinstatement at the University of Arizona, MAPS will move the research to another university where Dr. Sisley can continue to function as the Principal Investigator,” explains Brad Burge of MAPS.


  Baltimore Sun "Are Psychedelics the Next Medical Marijuana?" by Nate Greenslit.

The Baltimore Sun publishes an op-ed about what the growing cultural acceptance of psychedelic treatments has in common with the rise of medical marijuana in the United States. The article discusses how the recent resurgence in psychedelic research is developing new treatments for serious medical conditions, details how the recreational use of psychedelics within the counter-culture movement hindered early psychedelic research, and provides commentary about the future of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy.



August 4, 2014


  California Magazine "Goodbye to the Godfather of Psychedelics: Shulgin Now “Tripping in the Cosmos”" by Laura B. Childs.

California Magazine captures the experience of attending the memorial for renowned psychedelic researcher Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin, an event celebrating Shulgin’s life, knowledge, and research. Over 1,200 people gathered for the memorial in Berkeley, CA on August 2, 2014, including Shulgin’s family, friends, colleagues, and many others who have been inspired by his work to expand public knowledge about psychedelics.



August 3, 2014


  Vox "The Case for Medical LSD, Mushrooms, and Ecstasy" by German Lopez.

Vox reports on the resurgence of research into the medical potential of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, highlighting clinical studies investigating the therapeutic use of MDMA, LSD, and psilocybin for the treatment of anxiety, alcoholism, obsessive compulsive disorder, and addiction. The article notes how early psychedelic research has served as the inspiration and foundation for current psychedelic research, details the progress of current research, features a comprehensive interview with psychedelic researcher Dr. Charles Grob about past, present, and future psychedelic research. “It’s great to see that momentum is moving forward,” explains Grob. “I think we are going to be able to accomplish the goals that the earlier generations were not able to, by and large because the world we live in today is far more ready to handle the implication of research with psychedelic drugs.”



August 2, 2014


  The Los Angeles Daily News "UCLA Medical Researcher Studies Using Hallucinogenics, Ecstasy To Treat Autism" by Sandy Mazza.

The Los Angeles Daily News highlights MAPS’ new clinical study of MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum, now enrolling subjects at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute. The article details the methodology involved with conducting the study, notes the importance of creating a comfortable setting for study participants, and reviews various studies of the therapeutic potential of MDMA. “We’re looking for something to facilitate positive, ongoing change,” explains Principal Investigator Dr. Charles Grob. “You can’t take an autistic person and make them un-autistic, but you can treat the overwhelming social anxiety.”



July 31, 2014


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Petition to Reinstate Medical Marijuana Researcher Receives Over 100,000 Signatures"

A petition launched on Change.org by an Arizona veteran has gathered over 100,000 signatures in support of Dr. Sue Sisley’s efforts to initiate medical marijuana research in Arizona. Launched on July 10, the petition reached 100,000 signatures in just 21 days.



July 30, 2014


  AZ Daily Sun "Supporters of Former UA Med Pot Researcher Plan to Appeal to ABOR" by Howard Fischer Capitol Media Services.

The AZ Daily Sun highlights how MAPS, veterans, and other supporters of Dr. Sue Sisley’s marijuana research are asking the Arizona Board of Regents to help find a new location for the FDA-approved study of medical marijuana for PTSD in veterans. The article discusses the events surrounding Sisley’s termination from the University of Arizona, noting that her official appeal to be reinstated was rejected on July 28, 2014. “[MAPS] has said its money follows Sisley and will not be awarded even if the UA finds some other principal researcher,” writes Howard Fischer of Capitol Media Services.


  Associated Press "Fired Medical Marijuana Researcher Loses Appeal To Keep University Job"

The Associated Press reports that marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley’s appeal to be reinstated at the University of Arizona has been denied by the university. The article details Sisley’s work toward studying the effects of medical marijuana for PTSD in veterans and highlights her next steps toward initiating the FDA-approved research. “Sisley and her supporters will ask the Arizona Board of Regents to help her find a new home for the study. She is hoping to work with Arizona State University or Northern Arizona University,” explains the Associated Press.



July 29, 2014


  Military Times "Pot-for-PTSD Researcher Denied Reinstatement" by Patricia Kime.

Military Times reports that marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley’s appeal to be reinstated at the University of Arizona has been rejected, causing Sisley and MAPS to search for a new location to conduct our FDA-approved study of medical marijuana for PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans. The article discusses how political pressure may have influenced Sisley’s termination, highlights the online petition that has collected nearly 100,000 signatures in support of Sisley’s research, and looks at the future of MAPS’ planned medical marijuana study. “Dr. Sisley‘s primary focus is finding a safe and secure home in Arizona for this research,” explains MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. “Were it not for Dr. Sisley’s efforts, this research would not exist.”


  AZ Central "Fired U of A Marijuana Researcher Trying to Keep Study in AZ" by Brahm Resnik.

AZ Central features a report on medical marijuana for PTSD in veterans, highlighting MAPS and Dr. Sue Sisley’s planned study of marijuana for PTSD. The report explains that the study was planned to be conducted at the University of Arizona, though the University of Arizona’s decision to fire Dr. Sisley and reject her reinstatement appeal has resulted in MAPS and Sisley’s search for a new study location. “I’m focused on finding a home for this research,” explains Sisley. “I made a commitment to these veterans.”


  Arizona Public Media "Medical Marijuana for PTSD Study May Move From UA" by Zachary Ziegler.

Arizona Public Media highlights MAPS’ press release announcing that marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley and MAPS are in search of a new location to conduct their study into medical marijuana for PTSD. The article details how Sisley’s appeal to reverse her termination at the University of Arizona resulted was rejected on Monday, July 28, forcing the study to be moved away from the University of Arizona to a new location.


  CBS 5 Arizona "Marijuana Researcher Seeking Out Other Places to Do PTSD Study" by Jason Barry.

CBS 5 Arizona reports on the controversy surrounding the University of Arizona’s decision to fire marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, noting that the university has denied her appeal to be reinstated. The article features perspective about how political pressure may have affected Sisley’s termination, underscoring the need for fewer obstacles that prevent rigorous scientific research. “We have over a half million veterans living in Arizona, who have fought side by side with me to get this study to its precipice, where its finally ready to be implemented,” said Sisley. “I refuse to turn my back on these Vets.”


  NBC News "Pot Researcher Firing Unleashes Rising Veteran Backlash" by Bill Briggs.

NBC News reports that marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley’s appeal for reinstatement at the University of Arizona has been rejected by the university. The article details Sisley’s work to initiate an FDA-approved study of medical marijuana for PTSD in veterans, highlights how a petition to support Sisley’s research has reached nearly 100,000 signatures, and confirms that MAPS and Sisley are pursuing other locations where the study can be conducted. “It’s so sad that it requires political courage to do an FDA randomized control trial,” explains Sisley. “This isn’t like some stoner saying, ‘I want to do research.’ This involves blinded, independent investigators just trying to collect objective data.”


  CBS 5 Arizona "UA Denies Appeal of Medical Pot Researcher’s Firing" by Steve Stout and Colton Shone.

CBS 5 Arizona reports on the University of Arizona’s rejection of marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley’s appeal to be reinstated at the university. The article gives an overview of Sisley’s work to initiate an FDA-approved study of marijuana for PTSD and details the various political obstacles obstructing marijuana research. “If medical schools are forbidden from doing this, we’re really missing out in advances in medical science,” explains Dr. Richard Strand of the Arizona Wellness Chamber of Commerce.


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Dr. Sue Sisley Seeks New Study Location; UA Denies Appeal for Reinstatement"

On July 28, 2014, the University of Arizona denied Dr. Sue Sisley’s administrative appeal for reinstatement (view the letter).

Update (July 31, 2014): The Arizona Board of Regents has announced that the August 7 Executive Committee Meeting will not be open to the public. Contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) for more information.



July 25, 2014


  reddit "MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy Study Participant CJ Hardin Hosts Q&A on reddit" by CJ Hardin.

On July 25, 2014, former U.S. Army Sergeant and MDMA-assisted psychotherapy study participant CJ Hardin participated in an AMA (Ask Me Anything) session hosted on reddit. Hardin answered over 100 questions from the public about the benefits of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, the intensity of his combat experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan, and how his life has improved since overcoming PTSD.



July 23, 2014


  AZ Daily Sun "Study Head Threatens To Pull Funding Over Firings" by Howard Fischer Capitol Media Services.

AZ Daily Sun writes about the University of Arizona’s firing of marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley and the possibility that MAPS and Sisley will find an alternative location for their FDA-approved clinical study for PTSD in veterans. The article provides an overview of obstacles standing in the way of clinical research into the benefits of marijuana, and interviews MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin about the future of the study. “So long as the university obtains all the necessary approvals to comply with state and federal law and regulatory requirements, there is no policy in place that would preclude a different state university from conducting this research,” explains Katie Paquet of the Arizona Board of Regents.


  Arizona Public Media "Medical Marijuana for PTSD Study May Move from UA" by Maria Inés Taracena.

Arizona Public Media explores the next steps for MAPS and Dr. Sue Sisley’s planned study of marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in U.S. veterans while Dr. Sisley awaits the university’s response to her appeal. “We are not interested in working with other principal investigators that the university might propose to us, because they haven’t done the hard work for four years, like Sue has, to make the study happen,” said Rick Doblin, executive director and founder of MAPS.



July 22, 2014


  CBS 5 Arizona "Valley Veterans Rally To Support Marijuana Researcher" by Jason Barry.

CBS 5 Arizona highlights a press conference hosted by veterans and community leaders who gathered at the University of Arizona on July 22 to demand the reinstatement of Dr. Sue Sisley, the medical marijuana researcher recently fired by the university. The report describes the various efforts to appeal Sisley’s termination, addresses the political environment surrounding Sisley’s termination, and interviews prominent community members. “I am crestfallen and heartbroken that the university would impede this study as if we’re returning to the dark ages,” said former U.S. Attorney Mel McDonald.


  FOX 10 Phoenix "Vets Rally Behind Pot Researcher Set To Be Fired By the UofA" by Steve Krafft.

FOX 10 Phoenix reports on the July 22 gathering of veterans, activists, and community leaders at the University of Arizona to demonstrate their support for the reinstatement of marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, the principal investigator for MAPS’ planned study of marijuana for PTSD in veterans who was recently fired by the university. The report summarizes the circumstances surrounding Sisley’s termination, highlights the perspective of veterans in favor of medical marijuana research, and mentions that letters to appeal the decision were delivered to the Arizona State Board of Regents and the University of Arizona. “You are at a university; it should be about advancing science and understanding that to me is the key element of this,” explains U.S. Army veteran Sean Kiernan. “I think it is a black eye to the University of Arizona to be honest with you, and for her to get terminated and fired based on this study to me is un-American.”


   "Dr. Andrew Weil Asks University of Arizona to Reconsider Firing of Dr. Sue Sisley" by Andrew Weil, M.D..

On July 22, 2014, Andrew Weil, M.D., sent a letter to University of Arizona president Dr. Ann Weaver Hart to express his support for Dr. Sue Sisley, the medical marijuana researcher recently fired by the university after receiving approval to conduct MAPS-sponsored medical marijuana research for veterans with PTSD. Read Dr. Weil’s letter to President Hart



July 21, 2014


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Veterans Demand Reinstatement of Dr. Sue Sisley at University of Arizona on Tuesday"

On Tuesday, July 22, at 12:00 pm, a group of veterans will assemble at the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix to demand the reinstatement of Dr. Sue Sisley, which will enable FDA-approved research into medical marijuana for veterans with PTSD to continue at the University of Arizona. Media are invited to attend.


  Medscape "Psychiatrist Fired as ‘Payback’ for Marijuana Research?" by Deborah Brauser.

Medscape summarizes how the University of Arizona’s firing of marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley impacts FDA-approved research into marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in U.S. veterans. The article acknowledges growing support for Sisley’s reinstatement, citing mainstream media coverage on CNN and a public petition that has so far received over 33,000 signatures in support of Sisley. Sisley speaks about the political nature of her termination, the importance of developing alternative treatments for PTSD, and the next steps she will take to initiate clinical research into the benefits of medical marijuana. “My sponsor and I are prepared to fight, because this is a fight for scientific freedom. It’s not just about reinstating Sue Sisley. It’s a much larger issue,” explains Sisley.



July 18, 2014


  ABC 15 Arizona "Medical Marijuana Research For Vets Halted"

ABC 15 Arizona interviews marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley about her work toward initiating FDA-approved research into the potential benefits of medical marijuana for PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans.


  Associated Press "Professor Aims to Resume Research on Pot and PTSD" by Astrid Galvan.

The Associated Press reports new details about the University of Arizona’s decision to fire marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, the lead investigator for an FDA-approved study focusing on medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD in veterans. The article highlights various obstacles that have impeded the initiation of research into the potential benefits of marijuana, investigates anecdotal evidence suggesting marijuana is helping veterans manage symptoms of PTSD, and features an interview with Sisley about her perspective regarding her termination and the state of MAPS’ planned marijuana study. “Sisley says the battle is not over,” explains Astrid Galvan of the Associated Press. “She is asking the university to reinstate her. If she fails, she intends to try to get another university to take on the project.”



July 17, 2014


  AZ Central "Marijuana Researcher Appeals UA’s Firing" by Ken Alltucker.

AZ Central reports on the implications of the University of Arizona’s decision to fire marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, the lead investigator for MAPS’ planned study of marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in veterans. The article reveals how political pressure may have influenced Sisley’s termination, features an interview with Sisley about her official appeal to the university, and highlights how a public petition to reinstate Sisley has achieved over 31,000 signatures. “The main goal is to get me reinstated to conduct research that is so important to the veterans of this state,” explains Sisley. “I refuse to turn my back on these veterans, many who have stood shoulder to shoulder with me.”


  Tucson Weekly "Reefer Research Madness" by Mari Herreras.

Tucson Weekly gives an overview of the current controversy surrounding medical marijuana research in Arizona, featuring critical commentary about the University of Arizona’s decision to fire MAPS-sponsored marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley. Mari Herreras of Tucson Weekly highlights Sisley’s plans to continue working toward initiating MAPS’ FDA-approved clinical research into marijuana for PTSD, and provides needed perspective about how politics can influence the actions of universities by controlling schools’ budgets. “While her research has been delayed, veterans are dying,” explains Arizona veteran Ricardo Pereyda. “She’s advocating saving lives. Why would you rebuke her for that advocacy?”



July 16, 2014


  Charleston City Paper "Iraq Nearly Broke James Hardin. Ecstasy Is Helping Him Rebuild." by Paul Bowers.

In a cover story for the Charleston City Paper, North Carolina veteran James Hardin shares his experience receiving MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in a MAPS-sponsored trial. The article features a comprehensive overview of Hardin’s experience in the military, how posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affected his daily life, and how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy helped him overcome treatment-resistant PTSD. “It gave me that safety that I had not felt,” explains Hardin.



July 15, 2014


  Huffington Post "Petition To Reinstate Marijuana Scientist Gets Thousands of Signatures" by Matt Ferner.

The Huffington Post reports on the Change.org petition to support MAPS and Dr. Sue Sisley’s medical marijuana research in Arizona. The article provides background about Sisley’s termination and highlights the need for a more effective treatment for PTSD. “The university must reinstate Dr. Sisley, providing her with the necessary space and resources she needs to conduct her research,” wrote veteran Ricardo Pereyda, who created the petition. “Her study could mean life or death for many veterans. ‘Bigger Questions, Better Answers, Bear Down,’ is the Wildcat motto. Demand that President Hart and the University of Arizona live up to it.”



July 14, 2014


  VICE News "Meet the Researcher Who Was Fired After Trying to Give Weed to Veterans" by Samuel Oakford.

Medical marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley talks to VICE News about her work with veterans, why she was fired by the University of Arizona, and about her plans going forward. In the interview, Sisley speaks about MAPS’ planned study of marijuana for PTSD in veterans, stating, “It’s a triple-blind randomized controlled trial — it’s the most rigorous science you can conduct in the US. It would have answered tons of questions for the veterans and the general public.”


  Military Times "Researcher Leading PTSD-Pot Study Loses Job" by Patricia Kime.

Military Times highlights the work of marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, who was fired from the University of Arizona after working for more than four years to initiate MAPS’ planned study of marijuana for PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans. The article details Sisley’s dedicated work toward developing an alternative treatment for veterans suffering from PTSD, summarizes the study protocol, and reveals Sisley’s intentions to move the marijuana study to a new university if her reinstatement appeal is unsuccessful. “Dr. Sisley has a genuine passion for researching marijuana as a possible treatment for PTSD and a long track record providing clinical care to vets with PTSD,” explains MAPS Founder Rick Doblin in a letter to administrators at the University of Arizona.



July 12, 2014


  CNN "University Drops Marijuana Researcher" by Sanjay Gupta, M.D..

CNN chief medical correspondent Sanjay Gupta, M.D., speaks with Dr. Sue Sisley, the marijuana researcher recently fired by the University of Arizona, about why she was fired and what it could mean for MAPS’ planned, FDA-approved study of marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans.



July 11, 2014


  USA TODAY "Studies Ask Whether MDMA Can Cure PTSD" by Rachel Chason.

USA TODAY highlights how veteran Virgil Huston overcame PTSD after receiving MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in a clinical trial. “It wasn’t the MDMA that made him better, but the conversation that the drug facilitated,” explains Rachel Chason of USA TODAY.


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Letter from Rick Doblin to University of Arizona in Support of Dr. Sue Sisley"

On July 11, 2014, MAPS Founder Rick Doblin, Ph.D., wrote to Caroline Garcia, Associate Vice President for Research at the University of Arizona, to express MAPS’ support for Dr. Sue Sisley’s reinstatement at the university after she was fired on June 30. Dr. Sisley is the lead investigator of MAPS’ planned study of marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans.



July 10, 2014


  Tucson Weekly "Research Ruckus" by Brad Poole.

The Tucson Weekly reports that even with the University of Arizona’s firing of Dr. Sue Sisley, MAPS’ planned study of marijuana for veterans with PTSD will still go forward.



July 9, 2014


  CNN "5 Things You May Not Know About Post-Traumatic Stress" by Sara Cheshire.

CNN includes MDMA-assisted psychotherapy on its list of five things that might surprise you about posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While noting the various ways that traumatic events can affect people and their communities, the article highlights promising research into the use of MDMA as an adjunct to therapy as a treatment for PTSD. “We’re not just talking about finding moments of joy or spiritual awareness. The illegal drug MDMA, also know as Ecstasy or Molly, has been shown to help some individuals suffering from PTSD. Combined with therapy, it can assist in processing traumatic memories and change thought patterns surrounding traumatic events.”


  Al Jazeera America "University of Arizona Marijuana Researcher Fired Before Landmark Study" by Jacob Ward.

Al Jazeera America takes a look inside the firing of University of Arizona medical marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley.



July 7, 2014


  USA Today "Marijuana Study Backed By Feds Delayed After Researcher’s Firing" by Jolie Lee.

USA Today reports on the University of Arizona’s decision to fire marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, noting that Sisley believes her termination is the result of her political activism. The article highlights Sisley’s long path toward initiating MAPS’ planned research into the medical benefits of marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD in veterans, shares perspective from a University of Arizona representative regarding the political nature of Sisley’s termination, and explains the next steps necessary in order for Sisley’s FDA-approved marijuana research to be initiated. “We were on the cusp of finally implementing this study and helping veterans answer the question of what role marijuana can play in treating PTSD,” explains Sisley.



July 5, 2014


  AlterNet "5 Mind-Blowing Lessons from Psychedelics Experts" by April Short.

April Short of AlterNet reviews MAPS’ first online educational course, “Psychedelic Science: How to Apply What We’re Learning to Your Life,” a 5-session interactive collection of workshops hosted by Evolver Learning Lab that gathered prominent psychedelic researchers to reveal how insights from their research can be applied to people’s everyday lives in beneficial ways. The article features five notable lessons learned from the course, including overviews of harm reduction principles, research into the therapeutic use of MDMA, and how psychedelic research may help provide new treatments for a variety of serious medical conditions. “Since its founding in the ‘80s, MAPS has gathered a wealth of insight into the interactions between psychedelics and the human mind,” explains Short.



July 4, 2014


  Science "High Hopes | Can Ecstasy Treat The Agony of PTSD?" by Kai Kupferschmidt.

Science catalogues the reemergence of international research into the therapeutic use of psychedelics. The article details work conducted by MAPS to develop psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy into prescription treatment options for a variety of medical conditions, highlighting clinical research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy for anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness, ibogaine-assisted therapy for opiate addiction, and MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. “I believe in people’s basic human right to use molecules to explore their consciousness,” MAPS Founder Rick Doblin, Ph.D., tells Science.



July 1, 2014


  AZ Capitol Times "The Personnel Is The Political: Ua Marijuana Researcher Fired, Claims Political Motivation" by Evan Wyloge.

AZ Capitol Times reports that MAPS-sponsored marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley has been fired from her position at the University of Arizona. Sisley worked for years to receive approval from both the Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Health and Human Services to study the benefits of marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD in veterans, though now Sisley could face another delay due to her termination. Sisley speaks about the political connotations regarding her termination and reveals her personal thoughts about the university’s decision. “If there is some kind of behind-the-scenes string pulling going on that curtails educational freedom, that’s just unacceptable,” states Congressional Representative Ethan Orr. “I hope that’s not the case.”


  KJZZ "U of A Professor Claims She Was Fired Over Medical Marijuana Research" by Steve Shadley.

KJZZ broadcasts news of the firing of marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley from the University of Arizona. The radio segment shares details about Sisley’s dedicated work to initiate government-approved research into the benefits of marijuana for PTSD, provides context about the controversial political nature of Sisley’s termination, and features an interview with Sisley about her next steps toward conducting clinical research into the effects of medical marijuana.


  Your West Valley "Doctor Who Backs Wider Study Of Medical Marijuana Let Go by UofA" by Howard Fischer Capitol Media Services.

Your West Valley writes about the political climate surrounding medical marijuana research in Arizona, noting that MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley has been fired from the University of Arizona without a given reason. The article features an interview with Sisley about her perspective regarding her termination and provides context about how recent political activism in Arizona may have led to Sisley’s termination.


  The Los Angeles Times "Pot Researcher Abruptly Fired By University of Arizona" by Evan Halper.

The Los Angeles Times reports that the University of Arizona has fired MAPS-sponsored marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, the study coordinator for MAPS’ planned study of marijuana for PTSD. In an interview with Sisley, she explains how her contract was terminated by the University of Arizona without any reference to her job performance, speculating on how politics may have influenced the university’s decision. “This is a clear political retaliation for the advocacy and education I have been providing the public and lawmakers,” Sisley said. “I pulled all my evaluations and this is not about my job performance.”


  HuffPost Live "Professor Says University Fired Her Over Medical Marijuana Study" by Alyona Minkovski.

HuffPost Live interviews marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley about the political implications regarding the University of Arizona’s decision to terminate her employment and how it will affect MAPS’ planned research into the benefits of treating symptoms of PTSD with medical marijuana. Sisley speaks candidly about her termination, provides a comprehensive overview of her involvement with an FDA-approved study of marijuana for PTSD, and explains how difficult it is to tell veterans with treatment-resistant PTSD that they have to wait longer for an alternative treatment. “It just seemed to be a deliberate repression of all of my academic pursuits at the UofA,” explains Sisley. “It’s hard to ignore the fact that all of my work surrounds marijuana— whether it’s marijuana education or marijuana research— that was the bulk of my work at the UofA.”


  Reuters "Arizona Psychiatry Professor Says Fired Over Marijuana Research" by David Schwartz.

Reuters investigates the unfolding story regarding the University of Arizona’s decision to fire marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, a psychiatry professor who has been working for over 5 years to initiate a study of medical marijuana for treating symptoms of PTSD. Sisley is interviewed about the conversations and events that preceded her termination, speculating that the university’s decision was motivated by political influence as opposed to job performance. “It appears this is happening because I am at forefront of the most controversial research happening at the university,” explains Sisley. “That’s why they are throwing me under the bus.”


  Psychedelic Frontier "Interview with Rick Doblin, Psychedelic Pioneer & Founder of MAPS"

Psychedelic Frontier interviews MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin, Ph.D., about his career of advocating for research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics and marijuana. Doblin speaks about the process of creating a non-profit psychedelic research organization, reveals how various psychedelic experiences helped shape his perspective of the world, and lists recent successes surrounding the process of turning MDMA-assisted psychotherapy into a prescription treatment option for PTSD. “The FDA has been pretty much an ally, not in favor of medical marijuana or in favor of psychedelic research, but in favor of science over politics,” explains Doblin. “That, combined with the openness at the Department of Defense and the VA, combined with a growing series of pilot studies that have shown MDMA to be really helpful, suggests that maybe if we can scale up and do the work necessary to raise $15-18 million and treat 400 more people, we’ll be able to get MDMA as a prescription medicine in 2021.”



June 27, 2014


  The New York Times "Obituary for Richard Rockefeller" by The David Rockefeller Family.

The New York Times publishes an obituary for prominent philanthropist Richard Rockefeller, M.D., who passed away on June 13, 2014 at the age of 65 while piloting a small plane that crashed in Westchester County, NY. The tribute honors Rockefeller’s life as a physician, activist, and philanthropist by highlighting his involvement with various nonprofit projects that helped fulfill his desire to make the world a better place. The David Rockefeller Family concludes the obituary by encouraging people to honor Richard Rockefeller’s memory by contributing to the nonprofit organizations that he supported most, including MAPS, Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative, Sargasso Sea Alliance, and the Maine Coast Heritage Trust.



June 23, 2014


  The New York Times "A Rockefeller Known Not for Wealth but for His Efforts to Help" by Joseph Berger.

The New York Times honors the legacy of prominent philanthropist Richard Rockefeller, M.D., who passed away while piloting a small plane that crashed in New York on June 13, 2014. The article shares memories about Rockefeller’s life from his friends and family, providing perspective about Rockefeller’s varied hobbies, lifestyle, and philanthropic efforts. Rockefeller’s generous contributions toward improving the world are highlighted, including his work to provide medical care to areas of the world in need of assistance, preserve the sanctity of nature, and develop MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD. “Mr. Rockefeller, 65, was what is commonly called a Renaissance man, a Harvard-trained family doctor who could, among other enthusiasms, play the bagpipe, take polished photographs, carve wood, and ski, hike and sail expertly. But he devoted himself to a half-dozen causes, among them healing the wounds of post-traumatic stress disorder, curing sleeping sickness in Africa and saving the seas,” explains Joseph Berger of the New York Times.



June 22, 2014


  AlterNet "Blocking Science: How Congress and the DEA Have Thwarted Official Research on Pot for 40 Years" by April Short.

April Short of AlterNet writes about the new report published by MAPS and the Drug Policy Alliance on how the Drug Enforcement Administration has consistently obstructed research into the medical benefits of marijuana for decades. Short writes about the recommendations proposed in the report that could allow a more scientific approach to the approval of research. “This young man, this veteran who was having seizures in the brain now hasn’t had one for a year,” notes Congressional Representative Dana Rohrabacher. “And the fact that this VA doctor felt he couldn’t even honestly give his advice to a veteran who was going through brain seizures says there’s something really fundamentally wrong with the way things are working, and we need to change that and prove exactly what properties marijuana has, both negative and positive.”



June 20, 2014


  Reality Sandwich "The Second Psychedelic Revolution, Part Five: A Short Psychedelic History of Humanity" by James Oroc.

James Oroc writes for Reality Sandwich about the vast history of humans using psychedelics, highlighting how recent research into psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy is creating a “Second Psychedelic Revolution.” Oroc discusses the ancient use of psychedelics, contextualizes the first wave of psychedelic research beginning in the 1950’s, and highlights various researchers’ accomplishments that have served as catalysts for the new psychedelic research renaissance. “There are of course other factors and other people who have contributed greatly to this ongoing process and who also deserve mention; most importantly Rick Doblin and MAPS, who have almost single-handedly led the fight to get psychedelic research back into the Universities,” explains Oroc.


  AlterNet "Major Federal Health Official Admits That Prohibition Has Harmed Research Into Marijuana’s Benefits" by Paul Armentano.

AlterNet reports details from a Congressional hearing about marijuana research, highlighting National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Director Nora Volkow’s testimonial confirming that initiating marijuana research is more difficult than initiating research into other scheduled substances. The article features quotes from Congressional Representative Gerry Connolly’s exchange with Volkow during the House Committee on Oversight & Government Reform meeting, illustrating how Connolly’s questions to Volkow helped create a better understanding of the NIDA monopoly on research-grade marijuana and other notable impediments to clinical research into the benefits of marijuana.


   "Social Anxiety in Autistic Adults: First Two Subjects Enrolled"

On May 17 and June 20, 2014, the first and second subjects were enrolled in our new study of MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum. The first treatments are scheduled to take place in July. Based on the known effects of MDMA, as well as individual reports, this exploratory study in 12 subjects will focus on enhancing functional skills and quality of life in autistic adults with social anxiety. The study is led by Principal Investigator Charles Grob, M.D., and Co-Investigator Alicia Danforth, Ph.D., in affiliation with the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute.


  Mint Press News "Congress Pushes Feds To Expand Researchers’ Access To Marijuana" by Katie Rucke.

Mint Press News provides an extensive overview of the recent surge in support for medical marijuana, highlighting a letter signed by 30 members of Congress and sent to the Department of Health and Human Services Secretary in favor of removing restrictions to research into the medical benefits of marijuana. The article documents the various barriers preventing a full spectrum of marijuana research, reveals the inefficiency of the U.S. government-controlled monopoly on research-grade marijuana, and notes that cultural acceptance of medical marijuana is improving quickly. “It’s exciting to see such significant bipartisan support for eliminating barriers to privately funded medical marijuana drug development research,” explains Brad Burge of MAPS. “State legislatures, scientists and public opinion already recognize the need for more research into marijuana’s medical benefits, and Congress is now catching on. Even now, federal guidelines are preventing FDA-approved research from moving forward.”



June 19, 2014


  Business Week "Pot Scientists Brace for Marijuana Abuse as Laws Ease" by Anna Edney.

Bloomberg Business Week reports on the ongoing political obstacles preventing researchers from studying the benefits of medical marijuana. The article illustrates how the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)’s monopoly on the supply of marijuana does not include the necessary CBD-rich research-grade marijuana needed for MAPS’ planned study of marijuana for PTSD, compiles unsubstantiated claims about the potential risks of marijuana, and explores the possibility of importing research-grade marijuana from other countries. “I think we need all sorts of research into the risks of marijuana,” explains MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. “But what’s unbalanced is the obstruction of research into the benefits of marijuana.”



June 17, 2014


  Medical Jane "Report Suggests The DEA Has Ignored Four Decades Of Cannabis Research" by Ryan Longley.

Medical Jane offers perspective on a new comprehensive report on the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)’s scheduling of marijuana and other substances. The report written by MAPS and the Drug Policy Alliance highlights how the DEA has consistently obstructed marijuana rescheduling efforts, chronicles the DEA’s interference during the rescheduling of MDMA, and explains how the DEA has overruled and ignored scheduling rulings from the DEA Administrative Law Judge on multiple occasions. “Through the use of such tactics, the DEA has consistently demonstrated that it is more interested in maintaining existing drug laws than in making important drug control decisions based on scientific evidence,” notes the report.


  Congressman Earl Blumenauer "Blumenauer Urges More Marijuana Research"

Today, Representatives Earl Blumenauer (OR-03), H. Morgan Griffith (VA-09), Dana Rohrabacher (CA-48) and Jan Schakowsky (IL-9) along with 26 other members of Congress, sent a letter to the Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Matthews Burwell requesting that the process through which certified scientists obtain marijuana for medical research be made less burdensome.

View the letter.


  The Huffington Post "30 Members Of Congress Demand Increased Access To Marijuana For Research Purposes" by Matt Ferner.

The Huffington Post reports that on June 17, 2014, 30 members of Congress sent a letter to Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell to end the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)’s monopoly on research-grade marijuana and the redundant reviews that are preventing scientists from developing marijuana into a prescription drug. The letter offers solutions that would allow research to move forward more efficiently, suggesting that researchers should be able to purchase marijuana for research at-cost from NIDA if they are not being funded by the National Institute of Health and have received approval from the Food and Drug Administration, the Drug Enforcement Administration, and an Institutional Review Board. “We need the Administration to stop targeting marijuana above and beyond other drugs when it comes to research,” explains Congressional Representative Earl Blumenauer. “By increasing access for scientists who are conducting studies, we end the Catch-22 of opponents claiming they can’t support medical marijuana because there’s not enough research, but blocking research because they don’t support medical marijuana.”


  UPI "Thirty Members of Congress Ask HHS to Facilitate The Research of Medical Marijuana" by JC Sevcik.

UPI reports that 30 members of Congress are voicing their support in favor of removing barriers preventing researchers from efficiently studying the benefits of medical marijuana by sending a Congressional sign-on letter to Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell. The article demonstrates the importance of understanding the scientific and medical potential of marijuana by highlighting rational views from Congressional Representatives and drug policy experts regarding the current system of approving marijuana research. “Considering the number of states with medical marijuana laws and the number of patients who use marijuana medicinally in the United States, it is clear that we need more scientific information about the therapeutic risks and benefits of marijuana,” explains the Congressional sign-on letter.



June 14, 2014


  Vice "DEA Accused of Obstructing Research on Marijuana Benefits" by Mary Emily O’Hara.

Vice gives an extensive overview of the politics of medical marijuana research, highlighting a new report from MAPS and the Drug Policy Alliance revealing the Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA) decades-long obstruction of marijuana research. The article presents case studies from the report, notes that the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is in violation of the Controlled Substances Act of 1970 by not providing an uninterrupted supply of research-grade marijuana for FDA-approved research, and offers logical counterpoints to the government’s rationale regarding the scheduling of marijuana. “It’s like giving the Highway Patrol the ability to set speed limits,” explains former DEA senior intelligence research specialist Sean Dunagan.



June 13, 2014


  Stop the Drug War "DEA Ignores Science, Obstructs Research, New Report Finds" by Phillip Smith.

Stop the Drug War summarizes a new report written by MAPS and Drug Policy Alliance focusing on the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)’s refusal to utilize scientific evidence in their scheduling of marijuana and other substances. The article features an overview of the DEA’s interference with medical marijuana research, publishes viewpoints from politicians and activists, and highlights suggestions that could help reduce the DEA’s obstruction of research into the medical benefits of marijuana. “The DEA has opposed efforts to reform federal scheduling policy to acknowledge that marijuana has medical purposes,” explains Dr. Carl Hart of Columbia University. “As someone who has studied marijuana, this concerns me. That the DEA has not rescheduled marijuana seems to go against all the scientific evidence and against a society that uses empirical evidence.”


  The New York Times "Ayahuasca: A Strong Cup of Tea" by Bob Morris.

The New York Times publishes a comprehensive article about the role of ayahuasca in medicine, religion, and popular culture. The article highlights the experiences of multiple people who have participated in ayahuasca ceremonies, analyzes increased media attention surrounding ayahuasca, and provides perspectives from researchers about the potential benefits and risks of ayahuasca. “It must be used carefully, but it has a good mind and body connection,” explains MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin, Ph.D. “You have a sense of inner light in your brain.”


  The New York Times "Dr. Richard Rockefeller Dies in Small-Plane Crash" by Marc Santora.

On Friday, June 13, prominent MAPS supporter Dr. Richard Rockefeller died when the plane he was piloting crashed in Westchester County, NY. He was 65. “Richard’s political wisdom and generosity in making personal connections have helped us eliminate barriers to research that we had been unable to overcome for over 20 years,” reflected MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. “Now everything is different because of Richard.”



June 11, 2014


  Vox "6 Ways The Federal Government Continues Its War on Marijuana" by German Lopez.

Vox highlights six ways that the federal government is waging a “war” on marijuana, noting how various agencies are interfering with marijuana research and medical marijuana dispensaries. The article explains why it is difficult for researchers to initiate clinical research into the benefits of marijuana and describes the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)’s monopoly on the only government-approved supply of research-grade marijuana allowed for clinical research.


  Drug Truth Network "Interview with Rick Doblin About Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin"

Drug Truth Network interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin about the legacy of Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin, the pioneering psychedelic researcher who passed away on June 2, 2014 at the age of 88. Doblin speaks about Shulgin’s vast psychedelic research career, Shulgin’s involvement with creating the underground psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy movement, and ongoing research into treating PTSD from various causes with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy.


  Huffington Post "New Report Blasts DEA For Spending 4 Decades Obstructing Marijuana Science" by Matt Ferner.

The Huffington Post highlights the new joint report from MAPS and the Drug Policy Alliance on how the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) prevents research into the benefits of medical marijuana. The article includes perspectives from policy advocates who propose more rational approaches to federally regulated drug research. “The DEA has obstructed research into the medical use of marijuana for over 40 years and in the process has caused immeasurable suffering that would otherwise have been treated by low-cost, low-risk generic marijuana,” explains MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. “The DEA’s obstruction of the FDA approval process for marijuana has—to the DEA’s dismay—unintentionally catalyzed state-level medical marijuana reforms.”


  Boston Globe "Lawmakers Slam DEA For Targeting Mass. Doctors" by Kay Lazar, Shelley Murphy.

The Boston Globe reports that the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is threatening the careers of physicians and doctors in Massachusetts by forcing them to sever connections to medical marijuana dispensaries to maintain their licenses to prescribe other medications. Members of Congress have begun to speak out against the DEA’s actions in Massachusetts and are advocating for a new measure with the intention of protecting state marijuana laws from DEA interference. “It’s intimidation,” US Representative Steve Cohen explains. “We should encourage doctors to be involved with medical [marijuana] dispensaries . . . yet they are trying to run people off.”


  Al Jazeera America "DEA Obstructs Research into Medical Marijuana: Report" by Renee Lewis.

Al Jazeera America calls attention to a new report from MAPS and the Drug Policy Alliance about the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)’s continuous resistance to scientific research into the benefits of medical marijuana. The report, “The DEA: Four Decades of Impeding and Rejecting Science,” features a compilation of case studies illustrating how the DEA obstructs research and maintains unscientific drug scheduling standards. The article highlights a group teleconference hosted by MAPS and DPA that gathered members of Congress, scientists, policy experts, and medical marijuana advocates to provide perspective about the DEA’s interference with medical research. “To say the least I’m living proof that cannabis saves lives … it may not be the answer for everyone, but not only vets, but others should have the safe, legal option to treat their ailments with marijuana instead of all the prescription pills,” explains veteran Sean Azzariti.


  Substance "New Report Condemns the DEA’s Willful Obstruction of Science" by Mei Schultz.

Substance highlights a new report about the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)’s obstruction of scientific research into the medical benefits of marijuana. The report, by MAPS and the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA), was accompanied by a teleconference on June 11, 2014, featuring policy makers and drug policy advocates discussing solutions for expediting medical marijuana research. “The DEA is a police and propaganda agency,” explains DPA Executive Director Ethan Nadelmann. “It makes no sense for it to be in charge of federal decisions involving scientific research and medical practice, especially when its successive directors have systematically abused their discretionary powers in this area.”



June 10, 2014


  Drug Policy Alliance, MAPS "The DEA: Four Decades of Impeding and Rejecting Science"

This report, co-published by DPA and MAPS, illustrates a decades-long pattern of behavior that demonstrates the Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA’s) inability to exercise its responsibilities in a fair and impartial manner or to act in accord with the scientific evidence.


  MAPS, DPA "PRESS RELEASE: Wednesday Teleconference: New Report Highlights DEA’s Obstruction of Science"

On Wednesday, June 11, the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) and the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) will hold a press teleconference to accompany the release of their new report, “The DEA: Four Decades of Impeding and Rejecting Science.” The report – which is being made available today – documents a decades-long pattern of systematically obstructing medical research and ignoring scientific evidence.

Listen to the recorded teleconference.



June 9, 2014


  Arizona Public Media "AZ Health Officials Have Last Word on Medical Pot for PTSD" by Maria Inés Taracena.

Arizona Public Media announces that a new court ruling from Arizona Administrative Judge Thomas Shedden will allow people in Arizona to purchase medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD if it is approved by State Department of Health Services Director Will Humble. MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley shares her positive perspective regarding this ruling, notes anecdotal evidence suggesting safe and successful use of marijuana for PTSD, and discusses working with the University of Arizona to conduct new research into marijuana for PTSD. “Judge Shedden took a compassionate approach and was willing to listen to both patient experience and physician experience, and that is why this judgement is so sensible…because he is doing the right thing by our veterans,” explains Sisley.



June 7, 2014


  Associated Press "Arizona Judge Rules Pot Can Be Used for PTSD" by Terry Tang.

The Associated Press reports that an Arizona administrative law judge has issued a court ruling intended to allow PTSD to be accepted as a qualifying condition for patients seeking medical marijuana treatment in Arizona. The ruling must be accepted within one month by State Department of Health Services Director Will Humble, who previously rejected a similar initiative due to lack of research. The article highlights MAPS’ planned research into marijuana for veterans with PTSD and notes how veterans and others in favor of medical marijuana research are speaking out during rallies, court hearings, and media interviews to generate widespread awareness about alternative treatment methods for PTSD.



June 6, 2014


  Medical News Today "Moderate Doses of MDMA ‘Fatal in Warm Environments’" by David McNamee.

Medical News Today provides perspective about research into the risks, safety, and benefits of MDMA. The article places focus on the risk of overheating after ingesting MDMA and shares optimistic hope for future research that may help reduce various risks. David McNamee of Medical Daily News highlights MAPS-sponsored research into MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum for its potential therapeutic advantage over traditional medication for social anxiety. “The reason why researchers have turned to MDMA as a treatment for this group is because the conventional prescription medication used to treat anxiety or depression in other adults is often ineffective in people who have autism,” explains McNamee.


  Midwest Real "Do Psychedelics Have a Place in the Future of Medicine?" by Michael Phillip.

Midwest Real interviews Brad Burge of MAPS and retired Army Ranger Tim Amoroso about clinical research and anecdotal testimonials suggesting that the therapeutic use of psychedelics can provide profound healing for people suffering from a variety of conditions. The group discusses current research into the medical potential of various psychedelics, the best approaches to pursuing a career in the field of psychedelics, the value of the internet and social media for providing psychedelic education, and future research that can lead to FDA-approval for prescription use of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy.


  The Street "Government Pot Contract Open for Bids, but Nobody Wants It" by Debra Borchardt.

The Street analyzes the U.S. government’s planned renewal of a contract to grow research-grade marijuana, bringing attention to the current monopoly held by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). The article exposes how NIDA’s monopoly on research-grade marijuana is hindering the advancement of science while also in violation of the Controlled Substances Act of 1970 due to an inadequate supply of marijuana. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin shares his ideas and optimism regarding overcoming the obstacles preventing effective research into the medical benefits of marijuana, stating, “The NIDA monopoly is doomed. It will be broken by foreign imports.”



June 5, 2014


  The Conversation "Molecules Have No Morals: Ecstasy Godfather Alexander Shulgin’s Legacy" by Simon Cotton.

The Conversation honors the life of Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin, the recently deceased psychedelic researcher who passed away on June 2, 2014, at the age of 88. The article focuses on Shulgin’s legacy surrounding his creation of hundreds of psychedelics, his advocacy for the therapeutic use of MDMA, and his work co-authoring psychedelic education books PiHKAL and TiHKAL. “Shulgin maintained that his work was motivated by a belief that MDMA and other molecules could be useful aids to psychotherapists and in recent years evidence has emerged that MDMA may be useful in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder, whether victims of war or sexual assault,” explains Simon Cotton of The Conversation. “MDMA may yet prove to be Alexander Shulgin’s most valuable legacy.”



June 4, 2014


  Los Angeles Times "Alexander Shulgin, Chemist Behind MDMA, Dies at 88" by David Colker.

The Los Angeles Times publishes an obituary for Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin, the pioneering psychedelic researcher who passed away on June 2, 2014 at the age of 88. The article details Shulgin’s path to becoming a psychedelic researcher, explores how Shulgin helped popularize MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, and shares his insights about psychedelics and consciousness. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin is quoted about Shulgin’s advocacy regarding the use of MDMA as an adjunct to psychotherapy, stating, “It was the best candidate for legal therapy out of all the drugs he helped create.”


  Reset.me "Mother of Four Cures PTSD With MDMA" by Amber Lyon.

Amber Lyon of Reset.me interviews MDMA-assisted psychotherapy study participant Rachel Hope about how receiving MDMA as an adjunct to therapy in a clinical trial helped her overcome treatment-resistant PTSD. Hope recounts her experience, describes the importance of setting intentions for psychedelic experiences, and reveals life-changing insights that have helped her recover from PTSD and live a more fulfilling life. “It was something like getting acquainted with my very, very best self,” explains Hope. “You get to turn that best, best self onto your most damaged self. Wow— That’s profound.”


  Huffington Post "In Memoriam: Alexander Shulgin, The ‘Godfather of Ecstasy’" by Rick Cusick.

The Huffington Post pays tribute to the life of Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin, the pioneering psychedelic researcher who passed away on June 2, 2014 at the age of 88. The article shares Shulgin’s perspective on the future of psychedelics, highlights FDA-approved research into substances that Shulgin helped popularize, and examines the legacy that Shulgin’s books and chemistry will leave behind. “He was the bridge between ancient spiritual traditions and modern chemical science, and his many contributions that he made to mankind are likely to resonate through the ages,” explains Rick Cusick.


  Reason TV "In Praise of Psychedelics: Rick Doblin and the MAPS Project" by Alex Manning, Paul Feine.

Reason TV interviews leaders in the field of psychedelic science about the history and future of research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics to treat a variety of serious medical conditions. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin speaks about the benefits of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, shares information about the history of MAPS and the resurgence of psychedelic research, and speaks about his vision for the future of psychedelics. “By the end of 2021, we are hoping that MDMA would be a prescription medicine,” explains Doblin.


  NPR "How A Scientist Of Psychedelics Became The ‘Godfather Of Ecstasy’" by Audie Cornish.

NPR interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin about the legacy of pioneering psychedelic researcher Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin. Doblin speaks about Shulgin’s history of creating and experimenting with hundreds of psychedelic substances, commends him for being an advocate of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, and explains how his work will be remembered by future generations. “The legacy of Sasha will be, on the one hand, this incredible nuanced understanding of consciousness, spirituality, psychotherapy, love and the depth of human emotions. That’s what Sasha was really committed to - was trying to piece apart how it is that these molecules can open us up to parts of ourselves,” notes Doblin. “And on the other hand, he was a staunch defender of the right of individuals to explore their own consciousness at sometimes great risk to himself.”


  Reason Magazine "Reason’s Special Issue on Drugs"

Reason Magazine publishes a special issue on the role of psychedelics and marijuana in science, politics, and culture. The issue includes articles and videos on the politics of medical marijuana, the need for improved drug policy laws, making psychedelic research appeal to mainstream audiences, and more.



June 3, 2014


  International Business Times "Sasha Shulgin, the ‘Godfather of Ecstasy’ Takes His Final Trip - Death" by Ewan Palmer.

International Business Times memorializes the life of Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin, who passed away on June 2, 2014 at the age of 88. The article highlights Shulgin’s long career, ranging from the synthesis of new psychedelics to becoming an advocate of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy. Ewan Palmer of International Business Times notes that Shulgin’s research is laying the groundwork for a new generation of scientists to use psychedelics for their healing potential, stating, “Thanks to Shulgin’s original paper, medical studies on the positive effects of MDMA are still being carried out to this day, with clinical trials showing it has the potential to be used as treatment for anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).”


  Motherboard "‘Dr. Ecstasy’ Alexander Shulgin Is Dead, Leaving a More Euphoric and Weird World" by Michael Byrne.

Motherboard reviews the life of Dr. Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin, the recently deceased pioneering psychedelic researcher responsible for creating hundreds of psychedelic substances and for recognizing the therapeutic potential of MDMA. The article details Shulgin’s early career, reveals details about the birth of underground psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, and lists how recent studies into the therapeutic potential of MDMA were inspired by Shulgin’s research.


  The Washington Post "Chemist Alexander Shulgin, Popularizer of the Drug Ecstasy, Dies at 88" by Brian Vastag.

The Washington Post commemorates the life of Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin, the pioneering psychedelic researcher who passed away on June 2, 2014, at the age of 88. The obituary highlights Shulgin’s expansive career, his advocacy for the psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, and his perspective on the legacy of his work. “Sasha always felt these drugs didn’t open people up to drug experiences, but opened us up to human experiences of ourselves,” explains MAPS Founder Rick Doblin.



June 2, 2014


  The Hill "Sanctioning New Drug Research is Best Way to Honor Fallen Soldiers" by Andrew Gargano.

The Hill reports on the growing number of people suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), making a call for better treatment options for veterans and others diagnosed with PTSD. The article highlights research into the therapeutic use of MDMA, marijuana, and psilocybin as alternative treatment methods for people diagnosed with PTSD, noting that further research is required to better understand these treatments. “Perhaps the best benefit from these drugs is that they only need to be administered a few times in comparison to other costly medications which need to be taken daily for years,” explains Andrew Gargano of The Hill.



May 30, 2014


  Drug War Chronicle "The Ibogaine Frontier: A Report from Durban" by Douglas Greene.

Douglas Greene of the Drug War Chronicle reports on research presented in Durban, South Africa at the International Ibogaine Provider’s Conference, highlighting research results from studies into ibogaine-assisted therapy for drug addiction. The article features a review of presentations about the safety, sustainability, and science surrounding ibogaine. The review of the event includes updates from MAPS-sponsored ibogaine researchers Thomas Kingsley Brown, Ph.D., and Geoff Noller, Ph.D., about insights from observational studies taking place in Mexico and New Zealand.



May 27, 2014


  Northern Virginia Magazine "Venturing Strange Terrain" by Helen Mondloch.

Northern Virginia Magazine highlights the upcoming publication of award-winning journalist Tom Shroder’s new book Acid Test, a captivating true story about the resurgence of psychedelic research. The article features a brief review of Acid Test, highlighting Shroder’s investigative work into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics. “‘Acid Test’ explores the subject of psychedelic drugs on an epic scale, unearthing annals stranger than fiction,” explains Helen Mondloch of Northern Virginia Magazine. “Shroder recounts the medical renaissance of these and other psychoactive substances through a convergence of stories, including Doblin’s and that of an Iraq war vet whose treatments with MDMA reportedly helped him confront and surmount the anguishes born of combat.”



May 24, 2014


  Santa Cruz Sentinel "A New Way To Heal: Nonprofit Navigates Politics, Science To Put MDMA On Path To Clinical Use" by Jason Hoppin.

The front page of the Santa Cruz Sentinel features a comprehensive report on MAPS’ work, focusing on the history of the non-profit, current research into the therapeutic use of psychedelics, and how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can help people overcome treatment-resistant PTSD. “Studies are showing MDMA several times more effective than either Zoloft or Paxil at treating PTSD,” explains Jason Hoppin of the Santa Cruz Sentinel. “And unlike those medicines, patients do not need to keep taking the drug in order see the benefits — MDMA seems to permanently restructure a patient’s relationship to trauma.”


  Pioneer Press "Red Tape Slows Minnesota Medical Marijuana Study" by Christopher Snowbeck.

Pioneer Press reports on medical marijuana research in the United States, highlighting how political obstacles are preventing studies of marijuana to treat PTSD, pain, and other conditions. Researchers at the University of Minnesota have received a grant to fund a study of marijuana for pain in patients with sickle cell disease, though the research cannot commence due to lack of cooperation from government agencies. MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley expresses her frustration about political obstacles surrounding marijuana research, highlighting recent news that the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) does not have the necessary amount of CBD-rich research-grade marijuana for MAPS’ FDA-approved study of marijuana for PTSD.



May 23, 2014


  PolicyMic "Scientists Studied What Psychedelics Do to the Brain, and It’s Not What You’ve Been Told" by Tom McKay.

PolicyMic analyzes research into psilocybin for reducing alcoholism, treating anxiety associated with advanced-stage cancer, managing cluster headaches, and facilitating spiritual experiences. The article explores psychedelic research, highlighting promising studies of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. Psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy researcher Katherine MacLean of Johns Hopkins University speculates on the future of psilocybin research and speaks about positive changes in personality reported by study participants. “Many years later, people are saying it was one of the most profound experiences of their life,” explains MacLean. “If you think about it in that context, it’s not that surprising that it might be permanent.”



May 22, 2014


  AZ Central "Insider: Recall Effort Against Sen. Kimberly Yee Over Medical Pot Ends" by Yvonne Wingett Sanchez.

AZ Central reports that veterans in favor of medical marijuana research have withdrawn a recall initiative against Arizona state Senator Kimberly Yee, who blocked a bill intended to fund MAPS’ FDA-approved research into marijuana for PTSD. After launching the recall effort in April, the Arizona Veterans Assistance Committee worked alongside Yee and her attorney to come to an agreement about future legislature and research. Yvonne Wingett Sanchez of AZ Central shares information from her interview with Daron Babin of the Arizona Veteran’s Assistance Committee, noting that “Yee has committed to building a bi-partisan coalition to craft legislation next session that would allow funding for the study of cannabis as a treatment to various ailments.”



May 21, 2014


  Reset.Me "How Psychedelics Are Saving Lives" by Amber Lyon.

Amber Lyon of Reset.Me highlights clinical research indicating that the therapeutic use of psychedelics can help people overcome PTSD, anxiety, depression, and addiction.



May 20, 2014


  FOX CT "Ask the Pharmacist"

Pharmacy professor Dr. Michael White of the University of Connecticut speaks in a 6-minute feature on FOX CT about using MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in treating PTSD.


  Southern California Public Radio "Can Psychedelic Drugs Help Treat Addiction?" by Larry Mantle.

Larry Mantle of Southern California Public Radio hosts an episode of AirTalk focused on research into psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy for treating severe alcoholism and other drug addictions. Professor John Kelly of Harvard Medical School and Marc Mahoney of SOBA Recovery Center join in a discussion about traditional addiction treatments, current psychedelic research, and the benefits and risks of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy. “The stigma of using psychedelic drugs is fading, and renewed interest in this kind of therapy has prompted new studies across the country,” notes Mantle.



May 19, 2014


  Southern California Public Radio "Psychedelic Science: Psilocybin Shows Promise Treating Cancer Anxiety" by Stephanie O'Neill.

In the final installment of their four-part report on psychedelic science, Southern California Public Radio writes about ongoing research into psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage cancer. Stephanie O’Neill examines the culture surrounding death in our society, interviews researchers about how psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy can help cancer patients overcome the fear of death, and shares stories from study participants about how the treatment has helped them reevaluate how they spend their time while they are still alive. “To me it’s been some of the most remarkable clinical findings I’ve ever seen as a psychiatrist,” explains Johns Hopkins researcher Stephen Ross.

Read Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four


  Southern California Public Radio "Psychedelic Science: Using Ecstasy to Treat Post Traumatic Stress Disorder" by Stephanie O'Neill.

In Part Three of a four-part series on psychedelic science, Southern California Public Radio reports on the growing body of research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD, highlighting currently ongoing studies and the publication of research results. Stephanie O’Neill highlights how MDMA was originally used by psychologists as an adjunct to therapy in the 1970’s and 80’s, interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin about how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can help people approach their trauma in a more effective way than conventional therapy, and speaks with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy researcher Dr. Michael Mithoefer about the significance of the published results. “We had very strong results,” explains Mithoefer. “This may turn out to be a very effective therapy for many people who wouldn’t respond to other things…so the potential is there could be millions of people helped who aren’t being helped now.”

Read Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four


  Southern California Public Radio "Psychedelic Science: Researchers Enlist Psilocybin to Help Fight Alcoholism" by Stephanie O'Neill.

In Part Two of a four-part series, Southern California Public Radio reports on research into psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy for alcoholism and drug addiction. Stephanie O’Neill interviews a study participant who quit drinking alcohol after psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy, and notes that research into ayahuasca and ibogaine for the treatment addiction is also showing promising preliminary results. Johns Hopkins researcher Dr. Stephen Ross explains how integrating insights from psychedelic experiences can be just as important as the experience itself, stating, “Somebody can have an amazing transcendental experience and they can have insight that ‘I should never use drugs again,’” notes Ross. “But if there is nothing afterwards to contain and embed and nurture those experiences, it will just fade.”

Read Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four


  Southern California Public Radio "Psychedelic Science: The Surge In Psychiatric Research Using Hallucinogens" by Stephanie O'Neill.

Southern California Public Radio journalist Stephanie O’Neill debuts her new four-part report on new research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics for the treatment of PTSD, alcoholism, drug addiction, and anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. O’Neill interviews leaders of the psychedelic science field about past and current psychedelic research, explains how the birth of 1960’s counterculture contributed to the origin of the War on Drugs, and explores the mechanisms behind psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy. “It’s a new world and there is a greater need than ever for more effective treatment models for individuals for whom our conventional treatment models are often sorely lacking,” explains UCLA researcher Dr. Charles Grob.

Read Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four



May 18, 2014


  London Real "Rick Doblin - MDMA Therapy" by Brian Rose.

London Real host Brian Rose interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin about the “psychedelic renaissance” and inspiring international research into the therapeutic uses of psychedelics and marijuana. Doblin updates us on recent breakthroughs in medical marijuana and MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD research, announces MAPS’ upcoming crowdfunding campaign for psychedelic research, and discusses potential upcoming research for veterans. Doblin enthusiastically notes that psychedelic research is showing no signs of slowing down, stating, “There is more research now than any time since the late 1960’s.”



May 15, 2014


  Huffington Post "DEA Chief Michele Leonhart Should Resign" by Bill Piper.

Bill Piper of the Drug Policy Alliance encourages Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Administrator Michele Leonhart to resign due to her history of actively obstructing marijuana research, making inaccurate statements about the safety of marijuana and other substances, and disagreeing with drug policy reform suggestions from Attorney General Eric Holder and President Obama. “The U.S. and the rest of the world are moving toward an approach that prioritizes public health and legal regulation,” explains Piper, “but she remains hopelessly committed to the failed war-on-drugs approach. She is plagued with scandals, out of touch with reality, and increasingly an embarrassment to both Attorney General Holder and President Obama.”



May 12, 2014


  Midnight Sunrise Radio "The War on Cognitive Liberty" by Charles Shaw.

Charles Shaw of Midnight Sunrise Radio interviews former drug war prisoner Casey William Hardison and his partner, activist Charlotte Walsh, about how the War on Drugs often causes non-violent offenders to be imprisoned longer than those convicted of violent crimes. Hardison narrates the tumultuous history surrounding his 10-year prison sentence, shares insights about psychedelic chemistry, and emphasizes the importance of cognitive freedom.


  MAPS "Letter to MAPS Supporters" by Rick Doblin, Ph.D..

MAPS and Veterans for Medical Cannabis Access (VMCA) are requesting the help of our friends and supporters in contacting your Congressional Representative before May 19 [Update: Extended to June 9] asking them to add their signature to a Congressional Sign-On Letter urging that federal obstruction of non-NIH funded medical marijuana research be reduced by ending the redundant protocol review process by the Public Health Service (PHS).



May 11, 2014


  The World Today Weekend "Interview with Andrew Feldmar About Psychedelic-Assisted Psychotherapy" by Sean Leslie.

The World Today Weekend host Sean Leslie interviews MDMA-assisted psychotherapy researcher Andrew Feldmár about past, current, and future psychedelic research. Feldmar illustrates the pathway to approval for prescription use of MDMA and LSD as adjuncts to psychotherapy, shares his optimism about the training of future psychedelic therapists, and explains how treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can be more effective than currently-approved prescription medicines. “Within half an hour after taking MDMA, you’re present, your heart is open, and you feel no shame. So you can immediately deal with traumatic memories,” explains Feldmar. “It can save 5-10 years in psychotherapy.”



May 8, 2014


  Leaf Science "Marijuana Use May Improve PTSD, Study Finds"

Leaf Science reports on research into treating symptoms of PTSD with marijuana, highlighting FDA-approved research planned by MAPS and the recent publication of results from an observational study of marijuana for PTSD. Results from a New Mexico observational study conducted by George Greer, MD, indicate that marijuana helped reduce symptoms of PTSD by 75% on average.



May 7, 2014


  Medical Daily "Using Ecstasy To Cure PTSD: Psychedelic Gives War Veterans A New Lease On Life" by Anthony Rivas.

Medical Daily highlights research indicating that MDMA-assisted psychotherapy could be a promising future treatment for people suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The article highlights the rate of PTSD among U.S. war veterans, describes how the reputation surrounding MDMA is increasing favorably, and explains how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy helps patients approach their PTSD in an entirely new way. Anthony Rivas of Medical Daily notes that research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics is making a resurgence, stating, “MDMA is among other psychotherapeutic drugs experiencing a comeback, as psychiatrists look to promising alternative treatments.”



May 6, 2014


  Military Times "In Study, Ecstasy Shows Promise for Treating PTSD" by Kyrie O'Connor.

Military Times explores promising results of research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD, highlighting the impact the treatment could have on reducing the PTSD epidemic. The article suggests that this treatment method should be provided for people with PTSD who live in Texas during the next phase of studies, noting that Texas is one of the largest concentrations of veterans from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. The article investigates how MDMA interacts with the brain, reveals the history of MDMA’s transition from being a therapeutic tool to a recreational party drug, and notes that 83% of study participants overcame PTSD after receiving MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in a pilot study. “It’s tricky talking about a cure, but it is a sustained remission,” explains MAPS Clinical Investigator Michael Mithoefer, M.D.

This article first appeared in the Houston Chronicle and has been reposted by the Military Times.


  Houston Chronicle "In Study, Ecstasy Shows Promise for Treating PTSD" by Kyrie O'Connor.

Houston Chronicle explores promising results of research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD, highlighting the impact the treatment could have on reducing the PTSD epidemic. The article suggests that this treatment method should be provided for people with PTSD who live in Texas during the next phase of studies, noting that Texas is one of the largest concentrations of veterans from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. The article investigates how MDMA interacts with the brain, reveals the history of MDMA’s transition from being a therapeutic tool to a recreational party drug, and notes that 83% of study participants overcame PTSD after receiving MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in a pilot study. “It’s tricky talking about a cure, but it is a sustained remission,” explains MAPS Clinical Investigator Michael Mithoefer, M.D.



May 5, 2014


  International Voter Network "Studies Reveal Major Breakthroughs in Treating PTSD with Ecstasy" by Wendy Innes.

International Voter Network reports on research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy indicating that the treatment may help people overcome PTSD. The article highlights the history of MDMA, analyzes results from current MDMA research, and shares MAPS’ timeline for developing MDMA-assisted psychotherapy into a prescription treatment for PTSD. Wendy Innes of International Voter Network offers further details about the MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research, stating, “Study participants say that they are finding relief from the gut wrenching anxiety and other symptoms associated with PTSD that have plagued them for years.”


  The Huffington Post "The Federal Government Just Ordered A Thousand Pounds of Marijuana" by Matt Ferner.

The Huffington Post reports on the U.S. government’s increase in their production limits for research-grade marijuana from 46 to 1,433 pounds per year in anticipation of upcoming marijuana research. Despite the planned increase in production of research-grade marijuana, NIDA has recently announced that it does not currently have a supply of marijuana containing the balanced THC/CBD ratio that is necessary for our study of marijuana for PTSD, causing the commencement of this study to be further delayed by the government until at least the fall of 2014. Meanwhile, NIDA is in violation of the Controlled Substances Act of 1970, which requires it to provide a “continuous and uninterrupted supply” of marijuana for federally approved research.



May 2, 2014


  Vox "The Feds Are Looking to Score 650 Kilos of Weed" by German Lopez.

Vox reports that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) has increased the production quotas for research-grade marijuana grown by the federal government, allowing the supply of marijuana for research to increase from 21 kilograms per year to 650 kilograms— a nearly 3,000% increase. The increase in research-grade marijuana is for the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s supply grown at the University of Mississippi, a government-controlled monopoly that continues to create significant obstacles and delays for ongoing and planned research. “This is a big deal: it means the federal government is moving closer and closer to accepting marijuana for research and, potentially, medical purposes,” writes German Lopez of Vox.



April 30, 2014


  Fusion Live "Why Does Colorado Take Such a Hard Stand Against Marijuana to Treat Soldiers With PTSD?" by Ryan Nerz.

Fusion Live interviews Iraq war veteran Sean Azzariti about the politics of marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD. Azzariti describes recent government approvals of MAPS’ planned research into marijuana for PTSD as “huge step forward,” suggesting that this research could provide the evidence needed for PTSD to be added as a qualifying condition for medical marijuana programs across the country. “We want veterans to be able to speak directly to their doctors about this,” explains Azzariti. “I went from taking 13 pills a day to zero.”



April 29, 2014


  The Verge "Ecstatic States" by Lessley Anderson.

The Verge debuts their all-new longform report on the benefits of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The report highlights personal testimonials and researchers’ perspectives about healing trauma with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, notes the positive shift in public perception about the therapeutic potential of psychedelics, and illustrates the need for significant funding into the future of research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD. Vietnam veteran Bob Walker shares how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy helped him recover from PTSD, stating, “I did in 3 sessions what I couldn’t do in thirty, forty years.” MDMA-assisted psychotherapy study participant Rachel Hope also revisits the moment when she found out that she overcame treatment-resistant PTSD. “He comes back and sits down and says, ‘Rachel, you don’t have posttraumatic stress disorder any more,’” recalls Hope, on the verge of tears. “‘You don’t have it.’”


  The Bristol Post "Bristol Research: Danger Drugs ‘could Have Potential To Save Lives’" by Louis Emanuel.

The Bristol Post highlights emerging research into psilocybin, MDMA, and ketamine as treatments for addiction, depression, PTSD, obsessive compulsive disorder, and other conditions. The article profiles Dr. Tim Williams, a psychiatrist with experience researching addictions and psychedelics. “What we want to be able to do is use these drugs to help unstick people whose minds are stuck,” explains Williams. “Then we can allow them to engage with regular therapy, which they wouldn’t have been able to do before.


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Precious Moments Artist Timothy Butcher Leaves $1.9 Million Bequest to MAPS"

Funding for research into the therapeutic uses of psychedelics and medical marijuana increased significantly this April, when the non-profit Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) announced that it will receive a generous $1.9 million bequest from the estate of longtime MAPS supporter Timothy Butcher.



April 28, 2014


  The Verge "The Verge’s Inside Look at MDMA Therapy Debuts Tomorrow"

The Verge announces tomorrow’s premiere of their investigative report about the past, present, and future of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, including the story of one Vietnam veteran who found that MDMA-assisted psychotherapy helped him recover from PTSD.


  The Raw Story "Mystical Visions Induced By Magic Mushrooms Help Cancer Patients Conquer Fear, Study Shows" by Travis Gettys.

The Raw Story explores ongoing research into the benefits of psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage cancer. New York University researchers conducting the study note that study participants have reported reductions in anxiety, depression, anger, social isolation, and hopelessness after receiving the psilocybin treatment. The article also touches upon the growing field of research into psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, highlighting MAPS’ research into the therapeutic potential of MDMA and LSD. “Patients will come to me and say, ‘I understand intuitively now that love is truly the most important force on the planet. I experienced a profound sense of peace that I never felt before and it has stayed with me. I know now that my consciousness is bigger than me.’” explains researcher Jeffrey Guss.



April 24, 2014


  April Short "Psychedelic Mushrooms Could Cure Anxiety for Cancer Patients" by AlterNet.

April Short of AlterNet reports that researchers at New York University are using psilocybin, the active ingredient in some psychedelic mushrooms, as an adjunct to psychotherapy for the treatment of anxiety associated with advanced-stage cancer. Testimonials and preliminary results from some of the 32 participants in the ongoing double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study suggest that the treatment method may hold promise. The article highlights the reemergence of research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics, also calling attention to MAPS’ recently completed study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety advanced-stage illness. “While the federal government still deems them dangerous and void of medical purpose,” writes Short, “Research continues to reveal a promising medical potential of most psychoactive Schedule I substances to treat issues ranging from pain and anxiety to addiction and cancer.”


  Elite Daily "Forget Raving, MDMA Is Helping War Veterans Cope With Their PTSD" by Sean Levinson.

Elite Daily shares Tony Macie’s perspective about his experience participating in a clinical trial of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD. The article pieces together Macie’s story with quotes from his interview with Vice, crafting a narrative that details preparing for the treatment, arriving to important realizations during the MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, and receiving a new outlook on life. “I realized that I was pushing people away, so I rekindled a lot of relationships with my family and friends, and I was more open to love,” explains Macie. “When I got home [from Iraq] I couldn’t really communicate with my family, but I think I’m a lot closer to them now.”


  Independent Voter Network "Federal Decision on Marijuana Research Gives Hope to PTSD Patients"

The Independent Voter Network reports on the progression of MAPS’ planned marijuana research, highlighting recent government approvals that have brought research into the benefits of marijuana for PTSD in veterans closer to commencing than ever before. The article commends MAPS for receiving approval from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to purchase research-grade marijuana after attempting to do so for over 22 years, and details additional political obstacles that are still delaying the initiation of this research.



April 23, 2014


  Vox "The Federal Government’s Insane Restrictions on Medical Marijuana" by German Lopez.

Vox details how the current path for clinical research into the medical benefits of marijuana is shrouded by obstacles including redundant government reviews and the current scheduling of marijuana. The article highlights how the change in perspective from politicians and the general public is persuading governmental organizations to reevaluate their stance on research. MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley provides updates about trying to initiate FDA-approved research into medical marijuana for PTSD and shares her perspective about the current roadblocks surrounding this research. “The whole scheduling system needs to be reevaluated by true medical professionals, not law enforcement officials,” explains Sisley.


  The Global Post "The Next Hotbed for Medical Marijuana Research" by Will Carless.

The Global Post investigates how Uruguay’s new laws permitting the cultivation, sale, and use of marijuana may help scientists study the effects of the drug with less political interference than any other country. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin expresses his support for marijuana research to be conducted in Uruguay, noting that it would “greatly influence” discussions in many places. “Research done in Uruguay that’s scientific and that ideally gets published in a scientific journal would have a big impact on the state level for states that were thinking of expanding the medical use of marijuana to conditions where they claim there’s no research,” Doblin said.



April 22, 2014


  Washington Times "Veterans Push to Test Marijuana as a Life-Saving Treatment for Crippling PTSD" by Jacqueline Klimas.

Washington Times highlights veterans’ organizations growing support for research into medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD. The article provides anecdotal testimonials from veterans about their successful use of marijuana for PTSD, and notes that FDA-approved research into the the effectiveness of this treatment method still requires major funding and additional government approval before commencing. Veteran Sean Azzariti speaks about how influential marijuana has been for treating his PTSD symptoms. “It changed my life,” Azzariti says. “I wouldn’t be talking to you right now if I kept taking those pills.”


  Vice "Ex-Soldiers Are Being Given MDMA To Help Them Manage Their PTSD" by Jack Gilbert.

Vice interviews U.S. Army veteran Tony Macie about how his experience participating in a clinical study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy helped him overcome treatment-resistant PTSD. Macie speaks about being deployed in Iraq for combat, struggling to treat PTSD with the currently accepted treatments, and how his relationship with PTSD “changed completely” after receiving MDMA as an adjunct to psychotherapy. Macie describes how this treatment method helped him realize that he should stop taking painkillers, make efforts to rekindle his connection with his family, and become more open and positive. “I want anyone who is lost as a result of trauma to be able to have this tool at his or her disposal,” explains Macie. “For me, MDMA-assisted psychotherapy opened the doors to compassion, love, and moving on.”


  MAPS "Exploring Psychedelic Medicines"

Leading researchers in the fast-growing Canadian psychedelic science field speak about the future of research at Exploring Psychedelic Medicines, an event hosted in Vancouver by MAPS Canada in collaboration with the Canadian Drug Policy Coalition on April 22, 2014.


  CPR "Can Pot help Veterans with PTSD?" by Andrea Dukakis and Ryan Warner.

CPR interviews MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley about the timeline surrounding FDA-approved research into the benefits of marijuana for treating symptoms of PTSD. Sisley speaks at length about anecdotal evidence for the effectiveness of marijuana for PTSD in veterans, overcoming political obstacles preventing the purchase of research-grade marijuana, and creating momentum alongside veterans, the public, and media outlets to help advance scientific research. “We’re looking forward to seeing a renaissance of marijuana research in this country,” explains Sisley.


  The Daily Beast "Are the Feds Hoarding Pot?" by Steven Wishnia.

The Daily Beast reports on marijuana research in the United States, noting that governmental agencies including the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the Public Health Service have the power to arbitrarily delay scientific advancement by refusing to approve studies and denying researchers access to research-grade marijuana. The article gives a comprehensive overview of NIDA’s funding and approval of other marijuana-related research, noting that the agency favors research into isolated cannabinoids found within marijuana as opposed to studying the medical applications of the whole marijuana plant. The evolving situation surrounding MAPS’ planned research into marijuana for PTSD is illustrated, noting recent news indicating that NIDA does not have an adequate supply of marijuana to provide for the study.



April 19, 2014


  Guardian Liberty Voice "Ecstasy the Newest Therapeutic Drug?" by Faye Barton.

Guardian Liberty Voice shares the results from a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of how MDMA interacts with the human brain. The study found that participants were able to be more open and less negative when thinking about their memories, noting that MDMA affects areas of the brain responsible for emotional control. The article uses the MRI study to corroborate published results from MAPS’ clinical research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD, making a case that the therapeutic use of MDMA may hold promise for treating mental health conditions such as PTSD.



April 18, 2014


  Mysterious Universe "Mysterious Universe Podcast Highlights Psychedelic Medicines" by Benjamin Grundy.

Mysterious Universe explores the therapeutic potential of psychedelics through testimonials from the new documentary Neurons to Nirvana: Understanding Psychedelic Medicines and the reddit Ask Me Anything session hosted by MDMA-assisted psychotherapy study participant and veteran Tony Macie.


  High Times "Psychedelic Science: Online Courses Start May 7" by Mike Adams.

High Times encourages their readers to register for MAPS’ first online course, “Psychedelic Science: How to Apply What We’re Learning to Your Life,” a 5-session educational webinar sharing insights about the role of psychedelics in science, art, medicine, and spirituality. “There has been an explosion of research into psychedelics as therapeutic tools, scientific tools, and spiritual tools,” explains course organizer Brad Burge of MAPS.  “And this course is intended to give an overview that is both broad and deep.”



April 16, 2014


  Huffingon Post "Veteran Explains How MDMA Helped Heal His Postwar Trauma" by Anna Almendrala.

The Huffingon Post highlights comments from MDMA-assisted psychotherapy study participant and veteran Tony Macie’s reddit “Ask Me Anything” (AMA) session. The reddit AMA generated over 2,000 questions and comments, providing Macie with an outlet to discuss his history with the military, suffering from PTSD, and how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy changed his life and relationship with PTSD. The article shares Tony’s account of receiving MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, providing in-depth details about how this treatment method can help people transform their relationship with trauma. “Ultimately I’d like to see the VA look into this as a tool for veterans,” explains Macie. “So people with PTSD who are treatment resistant to other things can have this as an option.”


  Business Insider "Veteran: Ecstasy Drug Saved Me From My Battle With PTSD" by Jeremy Bender.

Business Insider shares questions and answers from MDMA-assisted psychotherapy study participant and U.S. Army veteran Tony Macie’s reddit “Ask Me Anything” session. Macie’s AMA thread became the top story on the front page of reddit, generating over 1,800 questions and comments about healing trauma. The article shares Macie’s answers about his experience serving in the military, being diagnosed with PTSD, and how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy was the first treatment to help him effectively adjust his relationship with PTSD. “I remember when the MDMA kicked in saying out loud that this feeling of relaxation and peace had been what I had been seeking since I returned from the war,” explains Macie.


  Motherboard "These Short Online Psychedelic Courses Will Bend Your Mind" by DJ Pangburn.

Motherboard announces the upcoming online course “Psychedelic Science: How to Apply What We’re Learning to Your Life,” MAPS’ new 5-session webinar hosted by Evolver Learning Lab. Brad Burge of MAPS is interviewed about the formation and trajectory of the course, his previous history with psychedelic education, and details a variety of ways that psychedelics can be used in a therapeutic context. “Our goal for this course is to show how applying insights from psychedelic research can help us lead more conscious, responsible, sustainable, healthy, and fun lives,” explains Burge.


  reddit "MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy Study Participant Tony Macie Hosts Q&A on reddit" by Tony Macie.

On April 16, 2014, MDMA-assisted psychotherapy study participant and veteran Tony Macie participated in an AMA (Ask Me Anything) session hosted on reddit. The public interview became the top-rated post on the home page of reddit, generating over 2,000 questions and more than 250 responses about Tony’s experience in the military, developing PTSD, and how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in a clinical setting helped him overcome PTSD.



April 15, 2014


  Crushplate "The Bright Future Of Clinical LSD Research: A Conversation With MAPS"

Crushplate interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about promising results stemming from the completion of MAPS’ study into the benefits of LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. Burge provides details about the results and design of the study, obstacles surrounding psychedelic research, and shares his optimism for future research into LSD as a catalyst for personal development, creativity, and spiritual growth. “This scientific evidence indicating that LSD can be administered safely in a controlled clinical environment with proper support will pave the way for future studies conducted by MAPS and other scientists around the world,” explains Burge.



April 14, 2014


  Health Central "First LSD Hallucination: April 16, 1943"

Health Central shares a comprehensive history of LSD, ranging from its discovery and initial research, to countercultural use and recently completed research. The article explores how Dr. Albert Hofmann’s synthesis of LSD led to an abundance of research into the effects of the substance as an adjunct to psychotherapy in the 1950s and 1960s, noting that over 40,000 patients were administered LSD during that time. The article concludes by highlighting MAPS’ research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness, noting that the study was the first study of the therapeutic use of LSD in over 40 years.



April 11, 2014


  Flying Forms "Interview with Brad Burge: The Therapeutic Use of Psychedelics" by Rabia Yeaman.

Flying Forms interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about results from the growing field of psychedelic research. The interview focuses on the difference between treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy versus other treatments, the process of conducting research with criminalized substances, and the benefits of psychedelic-assisted therapy. Burge highlights how psychedelic research can be applied outside of medical contexts, noting that previous LSD studies helped pave the way for neuroscientists to better understand how serotonin works within the brain.


  AlterNet "5 Amazing Things Scientists Have Discovered About Psychedelics" by April M. Short.

April Short of AlterNet takes a look at a few of the most fascinating findings from contemporary psychedelic research, from DMT occurring naturally in the bodies of mammals to psilocybin reducing activity in certain parts of the brain rather instead of increasing it. The article also looks at ayahuasca and psilocybin’s potential as treatments for cocaine and nicotine addiction.



April 10, 2014


  Arizona Horizons "Arizona Horizons Interviews Dr. Sue Sisley" by Ted Simons.

Arizona Horizons hosts MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley for an interview about MAPS’ proposed three-year study of the safety and effectiveness of medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans. Sisley details the study protocol, expresses the need for funding to initiate and complete the research, and provides an overview of political obstacles that have delayed the study. “The progress on marijuana research has been stymied by a lot of the different federal regulations,” explains Sisley.


  The Electronic Music Alliance, DanceSafe, the Drug Policy Alliance, Mutual Aid Response Services (MARS), and the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) via Zendo Project "EDM Coalition Calls for Updated Safety and Harm Reduction Practices"

A broad alliance of harm reduction organizations have announced the formation of a new coalition focused on setting improved safety standards for music events and festivals around the world. The EDM Coalition advocates for event organizers to provide increased drug education, free water, space for attendees to relax, on-site drug testing, and other elements that promote public safety. “Our coalition of organizations stand ready to help them and other event organizers make those changes for better, safer events.” says Janine Jordan of the Electronic Music Alliance.



April 8, 2014


  MAPS Canada "Exploring Psychedelic Medicines: April 22 Event Presents Leading Psychedelic Research in Canada"

On Tuesday, April 22, 2014, at 7:00 PM, leading scientists and educators will host “Exploring Psychedelic Medicines,” an open conversation about new and ongoing research into the benefits and risks of psychedelics in an evening lecture and reception at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, BC. The event is presented by the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) Canada and co-sponsored the Canadian Drug Policy Coalition.



April 7, 2014


  Arizona Central "Medical-Pot Advocates Launch Recall Effort vs. Sen. Yee" by Yvonne Wingett Sanchez.

Arizona Central reviews the political backlash facing Senator Kimberly Yee after her decision to block HB 2333, a bill that could disperse funds raised from Arizona’s medical marijuana program into FDA-approved research into the benefits of marijuana for veterans with PTSD. The Arizona Veterans Assistance Committee has announced a recall petition in an effort to remove Senator Yee from office. “We formed this committee to make a statement,” remarks Kathy Inman of NORML [Arizona]. “We don’t feel that one lawmaker should have the power to stymie this sort of research.”


  Arizona Central "Medical-Pot Advocates Launch Recall Effort vs. Sen. Yee" by Yvonne Wingett Sanchez.

Arizona Central reviews the political backlash facing Senator Kimberly Yee after her decision to block HB 2333, a bill that could disperse funds raised from Arizona’s medical marijuana program into FDA-approved research into the benefits of marijuana for veterans with PTSD. The Arizona Veterans Assistance Committee has announced a recall petition in an effort to remove Senator Yee from office. “We formed this committee to make a statement,” remarks Kathy Inman of NORML [Arizona]. “We don’t feel that one lawmaker should have the power to stymie this sort of research.”


  Dose Nation "DoseNation Ep. 47: Dr. Rick Doblin" by Jake Kettle and Brian Normand.

Dose Nation interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin and Ryan LeCompte of Veterans for Entheogenic Therapy (VET) about their advocacy for increased research into the benefits of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy. Doblin speaks about MAPS’ psychedelic research program, the promising results from research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD, and creating a global understanding that psychedelics can safely be used as medicines. LeCompte speaks about his experience in the Marines, founding VET after the loss of a fellow Marine, and his hopes for a future where psychedelics can be used legally for their therapeutic potential by veterans, active duty soldiers, and anyone else who may receive benefits.


  Arizona Central "Arizona Marijuana Dispensaries Applaud Extract Ruling" by Ken Alltucker.

Arizona Central provides an overview of Arizona’s medical marijuana program. The article explains that conditions including depression, migraines, and PTSD do not currently qualify for access to medical marijuana in Arizona, and highlights the efforts of Dr. Sue Sisley and MAPS to initiate a study of medical marijuana for veterans with PTSD. Sisley voices her opinion about the Sen. Kimberly Yee’s blockade of HB 2333, a bill that could provide significant funding to MAPS’ proposed study, noting, “That would be really sad if the veterans suffer because of the schoolyard games that are being played down there [at the state legislature].”



April 6, 2014


  Oped News "Investing in Psychoactives" by Craig Comstock.

Craig Comstock of Oped News reviews Neurons to Nirvana: Understanding Psychedelic Medicines, a new documentary about the resurgence of research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics. In his review, Comstock provides context about the history of psychedelic research, explores the prohibition of psychedelics, and shares inspiring quotes and moments from the film. “If we’re moved by the experts whom the director has gathered, and his genius at finding images that resonate with their messages,” muses Comstock, “Then many viewers may reconsider attitudes toward mindful molecules.”


  San Francisco Chronicle "It’s About Time - Pot to Ease PTSD" by Michael J. Haworth.

San Francisco Chronicle shares a reader’s letter responding to recent coverage of MAPS’ research into marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD. Author Michael J. Haworth shares an optimistic perspective about the study’s overall progress. “Put a rush on this one, and when official approval is secured, cut through the red tape and help our vets rejoin society,” writes Haworth.


  Arizona Daily Wildcat "Pro: Marijuana Studies Smoke Out Confusion" by Eric Klump.

The Arizona Daily Wildcat writes about the level of acceptance for medical marijuana in America, highlighting research approvals and growing medical marijuana programs as evidence of a shift in public perception. The article notes that MAPS’ FDA-approved study into the medical benefits of marijuana for PTSD is facing political opposition due to Arizona State Senator Kimberly Yee’s opposition of HB 2333, a bill that could provide funding for the study. “If scientists had the abilities to research as they should, with fewer loopholes, we would know so much more, and no longer be trapped in a smoke cloud of marijuana misinformation,” writes Eric Klump of the Arizona Wildcat.



April 5, 2014


  International Business Times "Magic Mushrooms and LSD Help Cancer Patients Overcome Fear of Death, Say Scientists" by Tom Porter.

International Business Times writes favorably about the resurgence of psychedelic research, highlighting that studies of MDMA, LSD, and psilocybin are helping scientists develop new treatments for serious medical conditions. The article highlights the landmark completion of MAPS’ study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced stage illness and provides details about the initiation of new research into MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in autistic adults.


  Tricycle Magazine "Dharma on the Playa" by Allan Badiner.

Allan Badiner writes for Tricycle Magazine about how the Zendo Project’s psychedelic harm reduction services at Burning Man convinced him to attend the festival for his first time after having “planned never to go.” Badiner shares elaborate details about his experience as a Zendo Project volunteer, recounting how applying harm reduction principles taught during the Zendo volunteer training helped him provide compassionate care for individuals undergoing difficult psychedelic experiences. Badiner describes one of his experiences with a guest in need of help. “I reassured him that his discomfort would be short-lived, bringing him water and extra pillows,” writes Badiner. “I wanted him to know that I was available to witness what he was going through. I listened to him talk about his life, relationships, dreams, and fears.”



April 4, 2014


  NORML Phoenix "NORML Phoenix Rallies Arizona Legislators to Approve Medical Marijuana Funding Research For Veterans"

NORML Phoenix reports on the strong showing of veterans, research advocates, elected representatives, and others who gathered in Phoenix, Arizona, on April 2 to rally in support of research into medical marijuana for veterans with PTSD. The group joined together to raise awareness of Senator Kimberly Yee’s blocking of HB 2333, an Arizona bill that could partially fund research MAPS’ medical marijuana research. “Instead of listening to the voice of reason, or any voice at all… she stops the democratic process so that these veterans cannot get the treatment they know works for them,” explains Daron Babin of NORML.



April 3, 2014


  International Business Times "Ketamine, LSD, Magic Mushrooms and Ecstasy: The Illegal Drugs Which Can be Good for You" by Ewan Palmer.

International Business Times investigates how research into the medical benefits of substances such as LSD, MDMA, ketamine, psilocybin, and marijuana is helping scientists develop new methods for treating depression, addiction, anxiety, PTSD, and other serious conditions. The article highlights MAPS’ research into the potential benefits of using LSD and MDMA as an adjunct to psychotherapy, highlighting promising results indicating that these substances can be safely used in a therapeutic context.


  High Times "One Arizona Senator Is Blocking PTSD MedCan Research" by David Bienenstock.

High Times author David Bienenstock writes about the controversy surrounding Arizona state Senator Kimberly Yee’s refusal to allow the progression of HB 2333, a bill that could provide some funding for MAPS’ planned study of the therapeutic benefits of marijuana for veterans suffering from PTSD. Yee is blocking the bill in favor of providing drug use prevention education, stifling the advancement of scientific knowledge that could bring relief to veterans. “By refusing to consider HB 2333, Senator Yee is making it clear that she would prefer the research never to happen at all,” explains MAPS Founder Rick Doblin.


  Associated Press "Advocates Call for Funding of Marijuana Research in Ariz." by Astrid Galvan.

The Associated Press reports that on Wednesday, April 2, veterans, activists, and elected representatives rallied in support of HB 2333, an Arizona bill that could have provided funding MAPS’ research into medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD. “We think it’s very undemocratic that Sen. Yee would choose to ignore a bill that was supported by a wide margin in the Arizona House,” explains Jessica Gelay of the Drug Policy Alliance.



April 2, 2014


  Mint Press News "Ariz. Senator Blocks Fed-Approved PTSD Medical Marijuana Research" by Katie Rucke.

Mint Press News announces today’s rally in support of medical marijuana research, taking place in Phoenix, Arizona, from 5:00pm-7:00pm on April 2, 2014. This rally will protest Sen. Kimberly Yee’s blocking of HB 2333, a bill that could fully fund MAPS’ research into medical marijuana for PTSD. The article details the progression of HB 2333, noting that Yee intends for the money raised from Arizona’s medical marijuana program to be used toward drug prevention outreach instead of toward funding research into the medical potential of marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in veterans.  “Senator Yee is placing politics before science, and doing so at the expense of our combat veterans,” explains veteran Ricardo Pereyda. “It’s a shameful way to treat our veterans, and worse, will force many not to pursue treatment at all.”



April 1, 2014


  The Daily Chronic "Arizona Medical Marijuana Supporters to Rally for Veterans with PTSD on April 2"

The Daily Chronic announces an organized rally in support of MAPS’ research into medical marijuana for PTSD will take place on Wednesday, April 2 in Phoenix Arizona. The gathering is happening as a result of Senator Kimberly Yee’s opposition of HB 2333, a proposed bill that could fully provide funding for our proposed study of medical marijuana for PTSD. “Being able to treat multiple symptoms from post-traumatic stress with cannabis has been instrumental in my ability to lead a full and productive life,” said veteran Ricardo Pereyda, “Senator Yee is placing politics before science, and doing so at the expense of our combat veterans.”


  NBC News "‘Out of Options’: Veterans with PTSD Hit Pot Underground" by Bill Briggs.

NBC News reports that an increasing number of veterans are using marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD. The article shares passionate testimonials from veterans and highlights planned research to make marijuana into a federally legal prescription medicine. “With all of these people coming home from war, [the PTSD and veteran suicide crises] are only going to get worse.” explains veteran Sean Azzariti. “How are we going to treat that? We can’t just keep throwing pills at people.”


  Vice Australia "Why Won’t Australia Run Medical Trials of MDMA?" by Joseph Gelfer.

Vice Australia interviews Martin Williams of Psychedelic Research in Science and Medicine (PRISM) about proposals to conduct research in Australia on the potential benefits of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Williams speaks about the rising rate of PTSD in Australians, how research has provided evidence that MDMA can work as an adjunct to psychotherapy, and the difficulty of conducting psychedelic research in Australia. “MDMA-assisted psychotherapy appears to be one promising alternative to current treatment options that should be available to practitioners,” explains Williams.



March 31, 2014


  Drug Policy Alliance (DPA), Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), Students for Sensible Drug Policy (SSDP), National Organization for Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), Americans for Safe Access (ASA), Veterans for Medical Cannabis Access, and Arizona Medical Cannabis Nurses Association "PRESS RELEASE: Arizona State Senator Blocks Funding for Long-Sought Medical Marijuana Research"

After 22 years of hard-fought efforts, the non-profit pharmaceutical company Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) has finally obtained approval from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) for a FDA clinical trial to examine the medical safety and efficacy of marijuana. The trial would study military veterans suffering from treatment-resistant post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Yet the study’s ability to receive Arizona state funding is in jeopardy due to State Senator Kimberly Yee.



March 28, 2014


  Playboy "Can LSD Be Used for Medical Purposes?" by Tyler Trykowski.

Playboy publishes an update on the growing field of research into the medical potential of LSD, psilocybin, and MDMA, highlighting recently published research results into psychedelic-assisted treatments for alcoholism, nicotine addiction, and PTSD. Virginia Wright of MAPS shares her perspective about the challenges of finding government funding for psychedelic research and how stigma sometimes prevents the advancement of science.


  Intellihub "New Study Researches MDMA Therapy for Autistic Adults with Social Anxiety" by John Vibes.

Intellihub covers the initiation at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute’s of MAPS’ new study of MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in autistic adults. Charles Grob, M.D., and Alicia Danforth, Ph.D., will conduct the MAPS-sponsored study and measure how MDMA-assisted therapy affects 12 participants’ reported levels of social anxiety.


  Mixmag "MDMA Could Treat Cancer and Other Illnesses But It’s Still Demonised"

Mixmag provides an overview of past and present research into the medical and therapeutic uses of MDMA, noting that scientists believe MDMA may provide relief to people suffering from PTSD, tinnitus, depression, Parkinsons, anxiety, and cancer. “Given the positive research that has been completed so far,” writes Mixmag, “It should be taken seriously as a potential therapeutic drug whether the establishment likes it or not.”


  The Raw Story "MDMA Helps Reduce Social Anxiety for Autistic Adults, and Researchers Want to Find Out How" by Travis Gettys.

The Raw Story reports on the initiation of MAPS’ new study of MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum. The article highlights anecdotal evidence from co-investigator Alicia Danforth’s study of recreational MDMA and Ecstasy use by autistic adults, noting that for some, positive effects “lasted for a year or more.” “If the results of this research warrant further investigation, data from this study will be used to design additional clinical trials,” Danforth explains.


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Historic Shift In Federal Policy As HHS Approves Medical Marijuana Study for PTSD"

On March 14, 2014, in an historic shift in federal policy, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services granted permission for researchers to purchase research-grade marijuana from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) for a planned study of marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans.



March 27, 2014


  Reality Sandwich "MAPS Offers First Ever Online Course" by Evolver Learning Lab.

Reality Sandwich announces MAPS’ first live online video course, “Psychedelic Science: How to Apply What We’re Learning to Your Life,” a 5-week educational webinar with experts discussing how insights from conducting psychedelic research can be applied to daily life. The begins May 7 and will include Rick Doblin, Gabor Maté, Brad Burge, Rak Razam, Alicia Danforth, Linnae Ponté, Julie Megler, Clancy Cavnar, and others who presented their work at the historic Psychedelic Science 2013 conference in Oakland, California. The course will cover topics including drug addiction, psychedelic harm reduction, psychedelic-inspired art, the therapeutic use of ayahuasca, and openly communicating with your peers about psychedelics.


  Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute and MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Study Initiated Exploring MDMA-Assisted Therapy for Social Anxiety in Autistic Adults"

Seeking new therapies for the treatment of social anxiety in autistic adults, researchers at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed) announced today that they are initiating a novel study into the safety and effectiveness of MDMA-assisted therapy. The study is the latest in an expanding program of research into the therapeutic use of MDMA by the nonprofit Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS). The research seeks to examine effective treatments for adults on the autism spectrum, who often face social adaptability challenges and greater anxiety, depression, and victimization than typically developing adults.



March 26, 2014


  NBC 7 San Diego "Can Ecstasy Treat PTSD?" by Bridget Naso.

A family tells NBC 7 San Diego why they believe that MDMA-assisted psychotherapy could have prevented the suicide of their son Daniel, a U.S. Army veteran diagnosed with PTSD. Howard and Jean Somers explain how a overflowing drawer of prescription medications did not help their son, nor did psychotherapy. “If this is something that will stave a suicide—that will hold that off for a day—it’s worth it,” declares mother Jean Somers.



March 25, 2014


  Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News "Psychedelics Shown to Relieve Anxiety" by Alex Philippidis.

Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News highlights recent breakthroughs in psychedelic research, noting that studies into the therapeutic potential of LSD, MDMA, ayahuasca, and psilocybin have reached a level of prominence unseen in decades. Brad Burge of MAPS speaks about the fading taboo surrounding psychedelic, how MAPS’ psychedelic research is funded entirely by donations, and how further research into psychedelic-assisted therapy may reveal beneficial uses for treating PTSD and other medical conditions.


  Nature "Federal Red Tape Ties Up Marijuana Research" by Helen Shen.

Nature explores the breaking down of political interference that has been preventing researchers from effectively studying the medical potential of marijuana. The article details MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley’s successful efforts to receive permission from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to purchase research-grade marijuana for MAPS’ FDA-approved study of medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD.


  Santa Cruz Good Times Weekly "Historic Shift in Drug Research" by April M. Short.

The Santa Cruz Good Times Weekly looks at the recent government approval of a study to investigate medical marijuana to treat PTSD symptoms in 70 U.S. veterans. After receiving final approval from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency, the study will be conducted at the University of Arizona by MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley. “If it can be shown that marijuana helps reduce depression and suicidality,” explains Brad Burge of MAPS, “then we can save a lot of lives.”


  Military Times "Research OK’d Into Effects of Pot on PTSD Symptoms" by Patricia Kime .

Military Times covers MAPS’ plans to study medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans. The study has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which will allow researchers to purchase research-grade marijuana from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) once final approval is obtained from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency. “We have thousands of years of history of human use of this drug,” notes Brad Burge of MAPS. “Far more years than SSRIs.”


  Arizona Daily Wildcat "UA Doctor’s Medical Marijuana Study Lacks Funding" by Brittny Mejia.

The Arizona Daily Wildcat highlights how an FDA-approved study into the medical potential of marijuana is facing funding obstacles due to Arizona State Senator Kimberly Yee’s blocking of HB 2333, an Arizona bill that could provide $250,000 in funding for the study. The article features quotes about the importance of improving our scientific understanding of marijuana from policymaker Ethan Orr, researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, and veteran Ricardo Pereyda. “I’ve got veterans across the country that are depending on us at the U of A now,” explains MAPS-sponsored researcher Sisley. “I don’t want to disappoint them.”



March 24, 2014


  My Chronic Relief "NIDA Approves Medical Cannabis Study for PTSD"

My Chronic Relief commends University of Arizona researcher Dr. Sue Sisley and MAPS for their persistence in pushing for government approval for marijuana research, highlighting that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has approved their request to purchase research-grade marijuana for an FDA-approved study into the potential benefits of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in U.S. veterans. The article explains the final steps to be completed before the study can begin, explaining that the researchers still require DEA approval and a source of funding.



March 23, 2014


  The San Francisco Chronicle "Pot To Be Tested as Remedy For Post-traumatic Stress Disorder" by Stacy Finz.

The front page of The San Francisco Chronicle underscores the unprecedented momentum for research into marijuana and psychedelics as treatments for PTSD. The article notes that MAPS’ FDA-approved study of the potential benefits of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans has received approval from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. “It’s 100 percent fantastic,” explains MAPS executive director Rick Doblin. “For 22 years I’ve been trying to study marijuana and make it a medicine. So this is a massive step.”



March 22, 2014


  Arizona Family "Ariz. Senator Stalls Medical Marijuana Research Bill" by Dennis Welch.

Arizona Family explains how Arizona State Senator Kimberly Yee has refused to consider a bill that could provide up to $250,000 in funding for MAPS’ government-approved study of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD. MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley speaks about the abundance of anecdotal reports that serve as the inspiration for her research. “Nobody’s suggesting this is a cure for PTSD, but it does seem to be extremely useful in managing day-to-day symptoms,” explains Sisley.



March 21, 2014


  Washington Post "Marijuana Research Hampered By Access From Government And Politics, Scientists Say" by Ariana E. Cha.

The Washington Post explores how scientists are overcoming political obstacles surrounding medical marijuana research. The article explores the past and future of medical marijuana, looking at the variety of medical conditions that may benefit from it. “If research shows that marijuana is an effective medical treatment, it could force the federal government’s hand on reclassifying it,” explains Washington Post writer Ariana Cha.


  KJZZ "Medical Marijuana For PTSD Bill Faces GOP Challenge" by Dennis Lambert.

KJZZ offers a glimpse at the political climate surrounding HB 2333, an Arizona bill that could provide $250,000 in funding for MAPS’ FDA-approved research into the potential benefits of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD. The article notes that Arizona State senator Kimberly Yee is using her political power to block the bill from advancing, providing a delay in researching ways to help our veteran population suffering from PTSD. “This should not be an ego battle. This should be a way to get good policy to the governor’s desk,” Arizona State Rep. Ethan Orr said.


  East Valley Tribune "State Senator Putting End to Marijuana Study Bill" by Howard Fischer.

East Valley Tribune reports on Arizona state Senator Kimberly Yee’s blockade of HB 2333, a proposed bill in the Arizona legislature that could provide funding for MAPS’ proposed research into the benefits of medical marijuana to treat PTSD. “What I’m contending is the private donors have already paid into a fund to support research,” says MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley. “We just need to have the opportunity to access it.”



March 20, 2014


  Fox 7 Austin "Killeen Veteran Hopeful as Study on Marijuana for PTSD Gets Green Light"

Fox 7 Austin highlights a veteran’s testimonial in support of MAPS’ planned study of the benefits of medical marijuana for symptoms of PTSD. “Every veteran who has used cannabis as an alternative to medication, to opiates and to psychotropic drugs testifies that cannabis was very effective, much less dangerous,” says veteran Dave Bass, Director of Veterans Outreach for Texas NORML. “You can’t overdose on it.”


  The Los Angeles Times "Letters: PTSD and MDMA" by James M. Bivins.

The Los Angeles Times publishes a reader’s positive response to previous coverage of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat PTSD. The letter of support comes from James M. Bivins, a Navy nurse who has worked with many veterans who suffer from PTSD. Bivins speaks about the “exciting” potential of using MDMA as an adjunct to therapy, noting, “It makes sense that psychotherapy would work better as a result. More studies on this, please.”


  Tucson Weekly "Stress Study Success" by J.M. Smith.

J.M. Smith of Tucson Weekly writes an editorial about Arizona state Senator Kimberly Yee’s refusal to allow the progression of a bill that could fund MAPS’ FDA-approved study into the benefits of medical marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in 70 U.S. veterans. Smith highlights MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley’s continued efforts to bring this study to fruition over the course of three years. “It looks like she is well on her way to helping Arizona veterans find relief.” writes Smith. “Wouldn’t that be awesome? Why yes, it would be awesome. Very awesome.”



March 19, 2014


  FOX 10 Phoenix "State Senator Blocks Medical Marijuana Study" by Steve Krafft.

FOX 10 Phoenix reports that a new bill to fund medical marijuana research in Arizona is facing political resistance from Arizona state senator Kimberly Yee. The bill to fund the study has been approved by the Arizona House with a vote of 52 to 5, though Yee is attempting to use her power to stop the Senate Education Committee from considering the bill at all. MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley explains how veterans reacted upon hearing about Yee’s actions, noting, “When they heard this week Kimberly Yee was refusing to allow this bill on her education committee agenda they were astounded, they were angered.”


  McClatchy Washington Bureau "Feds Accused of Steering Funding to Anti-Pot Researchers" by Rob Hotakainen.

McClatchy Washington Bureau provides an overview of the current state of marijuana research, highlighting recent government approval of MAPS’ planned study of the potential benefits of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD. The article interviews representatives from MAPS and NIDA, allowing a fair look at the merits of marijuana research. MAPS-sponsored Sue Sisley speaks about her plans to conduct the study upon receiving final approval from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency. “Sisley said she’s excited to get started and hopes to launch the project late this spring or early this summer,” writes Rob Hotakainen of McClatchy Washington Bureau.


  University Herald "Federal Government Approves Marijuana Study For Veterans With PTSD" by Jaleesa Baulkman.

University Herald notes the significance of the Department of Health and Human Services’ approval of MAPS’ planned study of marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in U.S. veterans. The article provides details about how the FDA-approved study will be conducted at the University of Arizona. Jaleesa Baulkman of University Herald writes that the study will help provide a better scientific understand of medical marijuana, noting that “Physicians have long speculated that medical marijuana use would help to calm the parts of the brain affected by PTSD.”



March 18, 2014


  Motherboard "With Long-Sought Federal Approvals, Psychedelic Research Is Finally Rolling" by Brian Anderson.

Motherboard showcases the recent wave of success for government-approved research into the medical benefits of Schedule I substances such as LSD and marijuana. To illustrate the momentum, the article highlights the Department of Health and Human Services’ March 14, 2014, approval of research into the potential benefits of medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD in veterans and the March 4, 2014, publication of promising results from research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. “Psychedelic drugs, it seems, are having a bit of a moment,” muses Brian Anderson of Motherboard.


  HuffPost Live "New Studies Show LSD Reduces Anxiety" by Ricky Camilleri.

HuffPost Live interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin, PhD, David Nichols, PhD, and John Halpern, MD, about the recently published results from MAPS’ study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. The experts speak about the variety of conditions that can potentially benefit from psychedelic-assisted therapy and share their perspectives on the past, present, and future of research in this area.


  The Joe Rogan Experience "Joe Rogan Experience #470 - Amber Lyon" by Joe Rogan.

Joe Rogan speaks with three-time Emmy Award-winning journalist and filmmaker Amber Lyon of Reset.Me about her investigative reporting on the therapeutic potential of psychedelics, highlighting both clinical research results and their personal experiences. Lyon speaks at length about her transition from providing mainstream coverage for CNN to becoming an independent journalist focusing on the use of psychedelics in cultures worldwide. She highlights how her own ayahuasca experiences facilitated her spiritual growth, as well as some of the dangers of taking ayahuasca in unsafe settings.


  New Zealand Doctor "Range of Cures Likely For Tinnitus"

New Zealand Doctor writes about research into treatments for tinnitus, noting that some researchers believe that MDMA can help reduce tinnitus symptoms. The article highlights MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin and MAPS Director of Clinical Research Amy Emerson’s presentation at the Tinnitus Research Initiative conference in New Zealand on March 12, 2014, about their observations from current MDMA research suggesting that additional studies into MDMA as a tinnitus treatment may be warranted.


  Phoenix New Times "UA Study on Pot and PTSD Could Impact Arizona’s Medical Marijuana Program" by Matthew Hendley.

Phoenix New Times gives details about the progress of MAPS’ FDA-approved medical marijuana research, set to be conducted at the University of Arizona by Dr. Sue Sisley. The article notes that MAPS has been attempting to purchase research-grade marijuana from the government for over 22 years, highlighting that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services granted researchers permission to purchase research-grade marijuana from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) on On March 14, 2014. The article details the medical marijuana program in Arizona, noting petitions to add PTSD, depression, and anxiety disorders as qualifying conditions have been rejected due to lack of research. “Without the evidence, neither the panel nor the AZDHS director were in favor of adding the conditions to the list.” writes Matthew Hendley of Phoenix New Times. “Perhaps that would change, pending the outcome of that UA research.”


  Huffington Post "What Psychedelic Research Can Teach Us About Mental Health" by Natalie Ginsberg.

Natalie Ginsberg of the Drug Policy Alliance writes for the Huffington Post about how the resurgence of research into the therapeutic potential of LSD, MDMA, and psilocybin is contributing to the development of new treatments for a variety of medical conditions. “Further research is desperately needed to quell the unbearable pain of hundreds of thousands of individuals,” declares Ginsberg. “As well as to continue illuminating the mysteries of mental illness and brain function.”


  Psychedelic Salon "MDMA and Autistic Adults: A New Research Study"

Psychedelic Salon shares the audio recording of MAPS-sponsored researcher Alicia Danforth’s presentation during Burning Man 2013 at the Palenque Norte Lecture Series about her work investigating the effects of MDMA on autistic adults. The podcast concludes with a discussion between Danforth and Dr. Charles Grob about the upcoming MAPS-sponsored study of MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum.


  Motherboard "How the World’s Foremost Psychedelic Researchers Finally Got Some Weed to Study" by Thor Benson.

Motherboard covers recent developments in medical marijuana research for PTSD, noting that MAPS’ FDA-approved study has received approval from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin is interviewed about the previous obstacles surrounding MAPS’ 22-year effort to start medical marijuana drug development research, and the differences between MDMA-assisted psychotherapy and medical marijuana as PTSD treatments.


  High Times "Feds Relent On Long-Delayed Pot For PTSD Study" by Paul Armentano.

High Times writes about the U.S. Health and Human Services’ March 14, 2014, approval of MAPS’ protocol for a study of effects of medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD in U.S. veterans. The article details previous political obstacles surrounding the commencement of this research and explores other studies looking into the medical potential of marijuana. “Regulators at the US National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the federal agency that must approve the use of cannabis in any FDA-approved clinical study, have consistently stood in the way. That is, until this month,” explains Paul Armentano of High Times.


  USA Today "Medical Marijuana Research for PTSD Clears Major Hurdle" by Jolie Lee.

USA Today reports on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ approval for MAPS to purchase the marijuana for a controlled study of medical marijuana as a treatment for PTSD in U.S. veterans. The article interviews University of Arizona researcher Dr. Sue Sisley and Brad Burge of MAPS about the current state of medical marijuana research, the need for more effective PTSD treatments, and the pathway to turning the whole marijuana plant into a prescription drug.



March 17, 2014


  Hemp.org "U.S.: Federal Government Approves Medical Marijuana Research For PTSD" by Steve Elliott.

Hemp.org highlights researchers’ efforts to conduct an FDA-approved study into the effects and potential benefits of smoked or vaporized medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD, noting that recent approval from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has pushed the research closer to commencing than ever before. “The political dynamics are shifting,” explains MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin.


  Camp Verde Bugle "UA Could Move To Forefront Of Medical Marijuana Research" by Howard Fischer.

The Camp Verde Bugle writes about the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’s March 14, 2014 approval of research into the potential benefits of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in U.S. veterans. The article details the study protocol and highlights the shift in public perception of medical marijuana. MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley explains why it is important that this study recruits participants diagnosed with treatment-resistant PTSD, noting more effective treatments must be explored. “All these folks have gone through all the standard conventional meds,” Sisley said.


  Military.com "Marijuana Study In Veterans Wins US Backing"

Military.com reports that MAPS’ FDA-approved study of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in veterans has received approval from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. After a four and a half month review process, MAPS now has permission to purchase research-grade medical marijuana from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the only provider of marijuana for government-approved research. The study will be conducted by Dr. Sue Sisley and will begin after receiving final approval from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency.


  Business Insider "How The Main Ingredient In A Party Drug Could Help Veterans With PTSD" by Jeremy Bender.

Business Insider reports that research into the benefits of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is showing promise and increasing worldwide. The article highlights a government-approved study led by MAPS Clinical Investigator Michael Mithoefer, M.D., which is currently investigating the effects of the treatment on veterans, firefighters, and police officers suffering from service-related PTSD.


  FOX 10 Phoenix "Marijuana Study in Veterans Wins Federal Backing"

FOX 10 Phoenix reports on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ approval of MAPS’ study of medical marijuana for PTSD. “There’s a hundred different scenarios that will run through my head at any given time, and using cannabis quiets that,” notes veteran Ricardo Pereyda. “It allows me to be able to go throughout my day being productive.”


  Reason "HHS Approves Marijuana Study for Veterans With PTSD" by Elizabeth Nolan Brown.

Reason notes the significance of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ approval of research into the potential benefits of medical marijuana as a treatment for symptoms of PTSD in veterans. After their second protocol submission, researchers waited over four and a half months for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to grant permission for researchers to purchase marijuana from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. “Researchers, advocates, and general folks for sensible drug policy hope it’s a signal that federal attitudes toward drug research are starting to shift,” writes Reason staff editor Elizabeth Nolan Brown.


  Associated Press "Marijuana Study in Veterans Wins Federal Backing" by Matthew Perone.

The Associated Press announces that MAPS’ FDA-approved study of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in veterans has received approval from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. After a four and a half month review process, MAPS now has permission to purchase research-grade medical marijuana from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the only provider of marijuana for government-approved research. The study will be conducted by Dr. Sue Sisley and will begin after receiving final approval from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency.



March 16, 2014


  AlterNet "Historic Shift in U.S. Drug Policy: Public Health Service Approves Medical Marijuana Study" by April M. Short.

AlterNet reports on the major shift in U.S. policy allowing researchers to purchase marijuana for a study measuring the benefits of treating symptoms of PTSD with medical marijuana. The proposed study has now received approval from the FDA, an IRB, and the Department of Health and Human Services, and is awaiting final approval from the DEA. “While many vets are calling for increased access to marijuana medicine,” writes AlterNet editor April Short, “the study in question would be the first-ever controlled, clinical study to look at using marijuana to treat PTSD in human patients.”


  Stars and Stripes "Exploring Therapeutic Effects of MDMA on Post-Traumatic Stress" by Alan Zarembo.

Stars and Stripes puts the spotlight on how international researchers and independent therapists are finding benefits in MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD. Through interviews with therapists, veterans, and researchers, the article takes a skeptical stance while underscoring the importance of further research. “I feel like I found meaning again,” says U.S. Army veteran Tim Amoroso, who used MDMA on his own and found that it helped his PTSD symptoms. “My life wasn’t as bad as I thought it was.”



March 15, 2014


  Los Angeles Times "Exploring Therapeutic Effects of MDMA on Post-Traumatic Stress" by Alan Zarembo.

The Los Angeles Times puts the spotlight on how international researchers and independent therapists are finding benefits in MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD. Through interviews with therapists, veterans, and researchers, the article takes a skeptical stance while underscoring the importance of further research. “I feel like I found meaning again,” says U.S. Army veteran Tim Amoroso, who used MDMA on his own and found that it helped his PTSD symptoms. “My life wasn’t as bad as I thought it was.”



March 14, 2014


  Medscape "LSD for Anxiety: Hallucinogen as Treatment Revisited" by Fran Lowry.

Medscape gives a comprehensive overview of the first study of the therapeutic use of LSD in over 40 years. The results, published in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, indicate that a full 200 microgram dose of LSD in conjunction with psychotherapy can be safely administered and can help reduce anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. The article covers everything from study design to music selection and features an interview with Gasser. “I’m quite satisfied with the results,”  explains Gasser. “Because the most important thing after a stop of 35 years of research is that we could show that LSD is safe and effective.”


  Los Angeles Times "Government Approves Medical Marijuana Research" by Evan Halper and Cindy Carcamo.

The Los Angeles Times is the first to report on the approval of our planned study of marijuana for symptoms of PTSD by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. After waiting over four and a half months for a response to our October 24, 2013, protocol resubmission, HHS finally granted approval for MAPS to purchase marijuana from the National Institute on Drug Abuse on March 14, 2014. MAPS has been attempting to purchase marijuana for medical marijuana drug development research for over 22 years. “This is a great day,” said University Arizona researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, who will lead the study. “The merits of a rigorous scientific trial have finally trumped politics.”

Much more news coverage at MAPS in the Media.



March 13, 2014


  Guardian Liberty "Study Brings LSD Back Into the Spotlight" by Gabriela Motroc.

Guardian Liberty shares the published results of MAPS’ study of the benefits of LSD-assisted psychotherapy for anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. The study was conducted in Switzerland by Dr. Peter Gasser, who found a 20% reduction in anxiety scores in the eight participants who received the full 200-microgram dose. Gabriela Motroc of Guardian Liberty declares that the completion of the study and the promising results have brought LSD “back into the spotlight.”



March 11, 2014


  The Big Picture with Thom Hartmann "LSD for the Dying?" by Thom Hartmann.

The Big Picture with Thom Hartmann invites April Short of AlterNet to speak about the significance of newly published LSD-assisted psychotherapy research results. Short notes that participants who received the full 200 microgram dose of LSD in the context of a controlled psychotherapy session reported a 20% reduction in levels of anxiety after their sessions.



March 9, 2014


  Stuff "Party Drug Link to Tinnitus ‘Cure’" by Shabnam Dastgheib.

Stuff highlights new work by Auckland researchers to start a study of MDMA for reducing symptoms of tinnitus. “In our study of veterans, some of them have tinnitus and report that MDMA-assisted psychotherapy had the unexpected benefit of reducing tinnitus to some extent,” explains MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. “Perhaps people with tinnitus under the influence of MDMA can relate differently to their tinnitus so it recedes to some extent into the background.”


  NPR "The ‘60s Are Gone, But Psychedelic Research Trip Continues" by NPR Staff.

NPR explores psychedelic science, looking at how researchers are studying the therapeutic potential of psychedelic substances after a decades-long hiatus. The article highlights the development of a protocol to study the effects of MDMA-assisted therapy to treat social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum and interviews Clinical Investigator Charles Grob. “I believe we are on the threshold of some very exciting discoveries that the health field can only benefit from,” explains Grob.


  The Times of India "LSD Can Help Ease Fear of Death" by Steve Connor.

The Times of India highlights the completion of LSD-assisted psychotherapy research conducted in Switzerland by MAPS Principal Investigator Dr. Peter Gasser. The results from the study were published in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease and indicate that subjects given a full dose of LSD experienced significant reductions in anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. “All of them said after 12 months of taking the drug that it was worth taking part in the trial and they would come again if asked,” explains Gasser. “They also said they would recommend it for other people in the same position as themselves.”


  Gawker "Doctors Are Reconsidering LSD" by Gabrielle Bluestone.

Gawker writes about the first controlled study of the therapeutic use of LSD in over 40 years, highlighting results indicating that study participants diagnosed with advanced-stage illness had a statistically significant reduction in anxiety after receiving a 200 microgram dose of LSD in conjunction with psychotherapy. The article notes that the participants who received the full dose of LSD noted a 20% improvement in anxiety that was maintained at the one-year follow-up.


  AlterNet "LSD Can Ease Anxiety for Dying Patients" by April M. Short.

AlterNet provides an overview of newly completed research into the medical potential of LSD-assisted psychotherapy. The results, published in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, indicate that LSD-assisted psychotherapy can be safely administered and can help reduce anxiety associated with treat advanced-stage illness. The article covers the history of this LSD research, describes the study protocol, and shares quotes from researchers and a study participant.



March 8, 2014


  Digital Journal "LSD Relieved Dying Patients’ Anxiety in First Tests in Decades" by Brett Wilkins.

Digital Journal writes about the monumental reemergence of research into the therapeutic potential of LSD after a 40 year hiatus. The article interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about the broad implications of the results from new research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. “The stigma against psychedelic research is finally lifting, and we’re getting concrete results showing that psychedelics can be safely and effectively used in the context of therapy,” Burge explains. “Like any drug, LSD has risks as well as benefits, and we’re finding the safest and most beneficial ways to use it.”


  TEDx Santa Cruz "Science Not Fear - Drug Policy and Medical Research: Virginia Wright at TEDx Santa Cruz" by Virginia Wright.

TEDx Santa Cruz hosts Virginia Wright of MAPS to speak about the promise of psychedelic research, how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can help people overcome PTSD, and how drug policy could be dictated by science instead of fear. “We need to use science, compassion, and not fear to understand these drugs so that we can help heal people,” explains Wright.



March 6, 2014


  The Independent "First Scientific Study of LSD in 40 Years Shows Positive Therapeutic Results" by James Vincent.

The Independent reports that new research into the therapeutic potential of LSD has produced results indicating that LSD-assisted psychotherapy can reduce anxiety associated with advanced stage illness. “The study was a success in the sense that we did not have any noteworthy adverse effects,” explains Principal Investigator Peter Gasser, who conducted the research in Switzerland. “All participants reported a personal benefit from the treatment, and the effects were stable over time.”


  The Huffington Post "First LSD Study In 40 Years Shows Promising Medical Uses" by Emily Thomas.

The Huffington Post reports that recently published research into the effectiveness of LSD-assisted psychotherapy is the first study of the therapeutic use of LSD in over 40 years. MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin is interviewed about the results of the study and the role of LSD in science and politics. “The political suppression of this research is over,” pronounces Doblin. “I don’t think the genie is going to be put back in the bottle.”


  Intellectual Gentlemen's Club "Intellectual Gentlemen’s Club Interviews Brad Burge and Dennis McKenna" by Jason Abbott.

The Intellectual Gentlemen’s Club interviews ethnobotanist Dennis McKenna and Brad Burge of MAPS about the current state of scientific research into the potential medical benefits of LSD, MDMA, psilocybin, and ayahuasca.


  News AM "LSD for Therapy"

News AM highlights results from new research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. The article details the protocol for the LSD study and shares affirming experiences reported by study participants. “After about two months of weekly therapy, the eight participants who received full doses of LSD improved,” notes the article.


  The Fix "LSD Used In Drug Therapy For First Time In Four Decades" by McCarton Ackerman.

The Fix highlights the publication of LSD research results in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, noting that scientists have found that LSD-assisted psychotherapy can help reduce anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin explains how this research can change public perception of psychedelics, stating, “We want to break these substances out of the mold of the counterculture and bring them back to the lab as part of a psychedelic renaissance.”



March 5, 2014


  Discover Magazine "First LSD Study in 40 Years Finds Therapeutic Potential" by Carl Engelking.

Discover Magazine covers the historic publication of results from the first study of the therapeutic use of LSD in more than four decades. Researchers note that subjects receiving a full dose of LSD during psychotherapy experienced statistically significant reductions in anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. “My LSD experience brought back some lost emotions and ability to trust, lots of psychological insights, and a timeless moment when the universe didn’t seem like a trap, but like a revelation of utter beauty,” said one study participant.


  The Los Angeles Times "First Trial of LSD as Medicine in 40 Years Shows Promise" by Melissa Healy.

The Los Angeles Times highlights this week’s published results from the first therapeutic study of LSD in more than four decades, showing that can be safely administered in a controlled setting and can help reduce anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. The study was conducted over a span of 4 years in Switzerland by MAPS Principal Investigator Dr. Peter Gasser, and the results were published in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. The article shares specific details from the study, analyzes results, and covers the history of LSD’s original role in therapy and science.


  The Verge "Acid Test: LSD Used as Drug Therapy for the First Time in 40 Years" by Arielle Duhaime-Ross.

The Verge provides an overview of new research into the medical potential of LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. The article highlights the results of the study, noting, “A year after the sessions ceased, the patients who had received a full dose of LSD — 200 micrograms — experienced a 20 percent improvement in their anxiety levels.”


  International Business Times "Can LSD Reduce Anxiety? First Human Trial In Decades Shows Potential Benefits Of Psychedelic Drug" by Zoe Mintz.

International Business Times reports that scientists have published promising new results from research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy, noting that the treatment can be safely administered in a controlled, therapeutic context. The results from the study indicate that talk therapy combined with LSD can help reduce anxiety associated with advanced stage to a significant degree.


  New York Daily News "First LSD Study In More Than 40 Years Shows Reduced Anxiety In Terminally Ill" by Deborah Hastings.

New York Daily News reports that results published in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease indicate that LSD-assisted psychotherapy can help reduce anxiety in subjects diagnosed with advanced-stage illness. The study notes the positive outcome of the study, explaining, “Those who received full dosages of LSD reported their feelings of anxiety dropped by about 20%.”


  PolicyMic "Swiss LSD Study Yields Incredible Results for Terminally Ill Patients" by Victoria Kim.

PolicyMic details how researchers have completed the first study of the therapeutic use of LSD in over 40 years, noting that LSD can be safely administered in a controlled clinical context. The article notes that the new research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy produced results indicating that anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness can be reduced after receiving two sessions of talk therapy combined with LSD.


  Live Science "Good Trip? LSD May Ease Anxiety" by Marc Lallanilla.

Live Science showcases how scientists are researching the therapeutic potential psychedelic substances including LSD, MDMA, and psilocybin and finding promising results. The article highlights the recent publication of results from research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat advanced-stage illness and notes that research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy is also producing inspiring results.


  The Dish "Psychedelics As Medicine" by Andrew Sullivan.

The Dish writes about how scientists are exploring the concept of psychedelic medicine, noting that researchers have recently completed studies into LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness and studies into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy to treat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).


  Now This News "Study: LSD Works as Anxiety Therapy"

Now This News creates a video overview of the history of LSD research, noting that results from new research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy indicate that the treatment method can help reduce anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness.


  CTV News "LSD-Assisted Therapy May Help Reduce Anxiety, Study Finds" by Marlene Leung.

CTV News looks into the revival of research into the therapeutic potential of LSD, highlighting how new study results indicate that LSD-assisted psychotherapy can help reduce anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. “This study is historic and marks a rebirth of investigation into LSD-assisted psychotherapy,” notes MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin. “The positive results and evidence of safety clearly show why additional, larger studies are needed.”


  Motherboard "Scientists Are (Finally) Studying LSD Again" by DJ Pangburn.

Motherboard remarks on the significance of reemerging scientific research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics, showcasing results from the MAPS-sponsored study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced stage illness. In a paper published in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, the study author’s explain the promising results and make a call for expanded research, stating, “Further study is warranted into the potential of LSD-assisted psychotherapy.”



March 4, 2014


  Medical Daily "LSD May Help Treat Anxiety For Terminal Patients: Are The Psychedelic’s Benefits Worth Revisiting?" by Anthony Rivas.

Medical Daily details the history of research into the medical potential of LSD and highlights the completion and results of the MAPS-sponsored study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for advanced-stage illness. The article notes the progression of interest in psychedelic therapy, stating, “Psychiatrists in the U.S. and abroad are starting to see that the drug may be worth revisiting — the patients certainly think so.”


  Reason.tv "MDMA for PTSD: How Ecstasy Is Helping People with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder" by Paul Feine and Alex Manning.

Reason.tv gives an investigative report on research into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, through original interviews with MAPS Clinical Investigator Michael Mithoefer, M.D., MAPS Founder Rick Doblin, Ph.D., and a veteran who shares his view on how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can help people suffering from PTSD.


  TIME "LSD Therapy Lowers Anxiety, Study Finds" by Alexandra Sifferlin.

TIME covers the publication of study results in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease indicating that LSD-assisted psychotherapy can help reduce anxiety associated with life-threatening disease. The MAPS-sponsored study was conducted in Switzerland by Dr. Peter Gasser and found that anxiety levels improved by 20% in volunteers who received a full dose of LSD.


  Waking Times "First Study in 40 Years Legitimizes LSD for Psychotherapeutic Use" by Buck Rogers.

Waking Times analyzes the recent renaissance of research into the potential medical benefits of psychedelics, highlighting how the publication of results from new research into LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness is helping reduce the stigma surrounding psychedelics. Buck Rogers of Waking Times notes, “Legitimate and positive scientific research is the key that can unlock long-held cultural taboos and misunderstandings about the nature of psychoactive substances.”


  The Raw Story "First LSD Tests in Decades Show Terminal Patients Gained Valuable and Lasting Insights" by Travis Gettys.

The Raw Story shares results from a double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy to treat anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. Dr. Peter Gasser conducted the study in Switzerland and worked with 12 participants. Gasser explains the results that he observed and measured in study participants receiving the full dose of LSD as an adjunct to psychotherapy, noting, “Their anxiety went down and stayed down.”


  Forbes "First Study Of LSD’s Psychotherapeutic Benefits In Four Decades Breaks Research Taboo" by Jacob Sullum.

Forbes reports on today’s publication of the results from the first therapeutic study of LSD in over 40 years in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. The Swiss study was led by Principal Investigator Peter Gasser, M.D. and monitored the anxiety levels of volunteers diagnosed with life-threatening diseases before and after receiving LSD-assisted psychotherapy. The article summarizes the study protocol and results, noting that the treatment was safely administered and resulted in statistically significant reductions in anxiety among participants. “These results indicate that when administered safely in a methodologically rigorous medically supervised psychotherapeutic setting, LSD can reduce anxiety,” explains Gasser.


  The New York Times "LSD, Reconsidered for Therapy" by Benedict Carey.

The New York Times announces today’s publication of the results from MAPS’ completed Swiss study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy for anxiety associated with advanced-stage illness. The study, published online in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, is the first study of the therapeutic use of LSD in humans in over 40 years. The double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study in 12 subjects found statistically significant reductions in anxiety following two LSD-assisted psychotherapy sessions. The results also indicate that LSD-assisted psychotherapy can be safely administered in these subjects, and justify further research. “It’s a proof of concept,” MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin explains. “It shows that this kind of trial can be done safely, and that it’s very much worth doing.”


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: LSD Study Breaks 40 Years of Research Taboo"

On March 4, 2014, the results of the first study of the therapeutic use of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in humans in over 40 years were published online in the peer-reviewed Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. Sponsored by the non-profit Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), the double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study in 12 subjects with advanced-stage illness found statistically significant reductions in anxiety following two LSD-assisted psychotherapy sessions.



March 1, 2014


  O’Shaughnessy’s "NIH Director Francis Collins —Ignorant, Dishonest, or Both?" by Fred Gardner.

Fred Gardner of O’Shaughnessy’s refutes comments about medical marijuana made by National Institute of Health Director Francis Collins in a recent USA Today article. The article notes that Collins lacks a fundamental understanding of what research has been completed. “Sad to see such willful ignorance,” laments MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. “As for the lack of research, it’s now been 4 months and 1 week that the Public Health Service reviewers have been sitting on MAPS’ marijuana/PTSD protocol.”



February 28, 2014


  AlterNet "Psychedelic Science Org’s 14-Year Headache of Trying to Buy Pot From the Feds" by April M. Short.

April Short of AlterNet gives a full overview of how MAPS’ FDA-approved protocol for medical marijuana research is facing obstructions from governmental agencies. “We’re hoping with this pressure, with enough public attention, HHS will make a statement or Obama—especially given his recent statements on medical marijuana—will decide to eliminate the hold, and to eliminate the process,” says Brad Burge of MAPS. “Something tells me this news about actual research being obstructed may come as a surprise to many.”



February 27, 2014


  Waking Times "Support the Troops – Let Them Treat PTSD with Cannabis" by Alex Pietrowski.

Waking Times examines how MAPS’ FDA and IRB-approved protocol for research into marijuana for treating PTSD in veterans is being blocked by the U.S. Public Health Service. “The fact that the government would prevent research of a natural medicine for the cure of PTSD speaks volumes about our government’s overall lack of interest in a genuine commitment to the mental health and wellness of our soldiers after returning from combat zones,” explains article author Alex Pietrowski.


  Mint Press News "Feds Block FDA-Approved PTSD-Marijuana Research" by Katie Rucke.

Mint Press News sheds light on how political obstacles are blocking medical marijuana research. The article notes that the FDA and Institutional Review Board-approved protocol for this research has been put on hold for over four months by the U.S. Public Health Service review process, delaying the advancement of scientific knowledge about marijuana and PTSD. “This groundbreaking research could assist doctors in how to recommend treatment for PTSD patients who have been unresponsive to traditional therapies,” explains MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin.


  Foreword Reviews "Book Review: Manifesting Minds" by Patty Sutherland.

Foreword Reviews takes a look at Manifesting Minds, the anthology of articles from the MAPS Bulletin released last month. The review highlights thought-provoking content from Manifesting Minds and describes the book as “an ode to all things psychedelic.”



February 24, 2014


  High Times "Feds Won’t Supply Pot for PTSD/Marijuana Research" by Mike Adams.

High Times reviews how MAPS’ FDA-approved study of medical marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in veterans is being blocked by the U.S. Public Health Service. The article notes that over 14 weeks have passed since the protocol was resubmitted to the PHS for approval, showing that this unnecessary review process hinders the advancement of science and medicine. “If the PHS review requirement was removed,” says MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, “we would gather information that could help veterans today. The stifling of medical research on marijuana stands in the way of our vets returning to a normal life.“



February 21, 2014


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE: Public Health Service Blocking FDA-Approved Medical Marijuana Research for PTSD"

A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and University of Arizona Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved protocol for a study of marijuana for symptoms of PTSD in U.S. veterans, sponsored by the non-profit Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), has been on hold for over 3½ months, as researchers wait for the PHS to respond to their request to purchase marijuana for the study.



February 20, 2014


  The Nexian "Rick Doblin Asks the Government About Their Obstruction of Cannabis Research" by David Nickles.

The Nexian explains how MAPS’ FDA-approved study of marijuana for treating symptoms of PTSD cannot begin due to obstacles put in place by the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). The article highlights MAPS Executive Director Rick Doblin’s recent letter to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services explaining how research can only move forward if the PHS protocol review process ends and/or the NIDA monopoly on marijuana ends.



February 18, 2014


  Marie Claire "The New Power Trip: Inside the World of Ayahuasca" by Abby Aguirre.

Abby Aguirre writes for Marie Claire about the increase of public interest in ayahuasca, detailing the history, culture, and science surrounding the psychedelic brew. Aguirre shares insights gleaned from her ayahuasca experience, interviews researchers about the therapeutic potential of ayahuasca, and calls attention to how ayahuasca retreats are rapidly becoming the newest health fad.



February 14, 2014


  Reality Sandwich "The Second Psychedelic Revolution Part One: The End of Acid" by James Oroc.

Author James Oroc writes for Reality Sandwich about how psychedelic research education positively influences the cultural perception of psychedelics. Oroc defines some of the elements contributing to these changes. “We can witness psychedelic research slowly but surely re-entering the universities and research labs,” he writes, “thanks to: the vision and persistence of Rick Doblin and MAPS.”


  AlterNet "Cannabis University Trains Vets to Grow, Sell and Advocate for Pot Medicine" by April M. Short.

AlterNet reports that Oaksterdam University has launched a new scholarship fund to provide veterans with an extensive education about the science, politics, history, and careers surrounding medical marijuana. The article makes it clear that MAPS’ proposed research into the effects of medical marijuana to treat symptoms of PTSD in veterans is continuing to face governmental obstacles, noting that over three months have passed since the study protocol has been resubmitted for review without receiving a response from the government.



February 13, 2014


  Intellectual Gentlemen's Club "Intellectual Gentleman’s Club Interviews Veteran Tim Amoroso" by Jason Abbott and Matt Abbott.

The Intellectual Gentlemen’s Club interviews U.S. Army veteran Tim Amoroso about his experience serving in the military, returning home with PTSD, and how his non-clinical experiences with psychedelics changed his relationship with PTSD. Amoroso and the show’s hosts discuss the risks and benefits of psychedelic experiences, share their perspectives on the history of psychedelic research, and offer their hopes for future legal uses of psychedelics.



February 12, 2014


  The Stream "Psychedelic Drugs: Harmful or Therapeutic?"

The Stream explores the current status of research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin shares promising results from completed psychedelic research and Rachel Hope speaks about how being a study participant in MAPS’ study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy helped her overcome treatment-resistant PTSD.



February 9, 2014


  WND "70 Million Americans Taking Mind-altering Drugs" by David Kupelian.

WND comments on current drug use in America, examining how prescription drugs, alcohol, and other substances influence public health. While examining the future of medicine, the article highlights MAPS’ research into the medical potential of psychedelics and marijuana as treatments for a variety of conditions.



February 7, 2014


  Medical Daily "Open Science Or Protective Laws? Ending Restrictions On Psychoactive Drug Research" by Susan Scutti.

Medical Daily responds to Scientific American’s recent article about obstacles surrounding psychedelic research. The article explores the history of research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics, noting that LSD and MDMA were originally used in medicine before being placed in Schedule I.  Susan Scutti of Medical Daily writes about why the research should continue, wondering whether “[p]erhaps the world would be a better place.”


  Forbes "More Than Zero: Reclassifying Marijuana Could Have A Significant Impact On Drug Policy" by Jacob Sullum.

Forbes investigates the laws and politics surrounding marijuana, noting how medical marijuana research is being blocked by federal agencies. The article highlights President Obama’s recent comments about the safety of marijuana, and MAPS Founder Rick Doblin explains that receiving further research approval is necessary for marijuana to become reclassified. “Assuming that marijuana has been approved as a prescription medicine by the FDA,” Doblin says, “Schedule II seems too high, since Marinol is in Schedule III. Due to its actual abuse potential, marijuana for medical use should be in Schedule V.”


  Psychedelic Press UK "Interview with Manifesting Minds editor Brad Burge of MAPS"

Psychedelic Press UK interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about Manifesting Minds, the newly released anthology of articles from the MAPS Bulletin. Burge speaks about the wide variety of topics about psychedelics found in special editions of the MAPS Bulletin and offers insight into the future of research into the medical potential of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. “Though our primary focus is scientific research,” he explains, “Educating the public is also an essential part of our mission and the MAPS Bulletin has been a way to do that.”



February 5, 2014


  Reality Sandwich "Consideration of Ayahuasca for the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder" by Jessica Nielson and Julie Megler.

Reality Sandwich features an excerpt about ayahuasca research from Manifesting Minds, the newly released MAPS Bulletin anthology. The article gives an extensive overview of research into ayahuasca-assisted therapy as a potential treatment for PTSD and points to studies investigating the use of ayahuasca as a treatment for drug addiction.


  The Daily Beast "Longtime Sufferers of Cluster Headaches Find Relief in Psychedelics" by Valerie Vande Panne.

The Daily Beast reports on new research into psilocybin and LSD as treatments for cluster headaches, featuring interviews with researchers Dr. John Halpern and Bob Wold of ClusterBusters. Halpern speaks about 2-Bromo-LSD, a non-psychoactive version of LSD, which could also help relieve cluster headaches. To illustrate the need for more effective treatment options, the article cites statistics published by Bob Wold in the MAPS Bulletin, noting that the suicide rate is 20 times higher than average for people suffering from cluster headaches.


  Good Times Weekly "Tales of the Vine" by Damon Orion.

Good Times Weekly shares how journalist Rak Razam first experienced ayahuasca in Peru while creating a report about shamanism, which led him to write a book and direct a documentary, both of which are titled Aya: Awakenings. The article highlights the upcoming MAPS-sponsored film screening and Q&A featuring Rak Razam and members of the MAPS Staff on February 8 in Santa Cruz, CA.



February 4, 2014


  Psychology Today "Psychedelics 2.0 and the Shadow of the Sixties" by Anca Ulea.

Psychology Today explores how research into the effects of psychedelics has changed between the 1960s and today, highlighting how scientists have become more rigorous with their studies. “The field itself has kind of moved from an excited adolescence to a calmer young adulthood,” explains Brad Burge of MAPS. “We have new methodologies that are really helping out, we control our clinical studies carefully with double blinds and really make sure to be as scientific as possible without that kind of explosive enthusiasm that earlier researchers had.”


  Psychedelic Press UK "Review: Manifesting Minds by Rick Doblin and Brad Burge (Eds.)"

Psychedelic Press UK reviews Manifesting Minds, the MAPS Bulletin anthology that features over thirty contributions from experts about the role of psychedelics in science, medicine, culture, and spirituality. The article highlights the history and purpose of the MAPS Bulletin, shares excerpts from various portions of the book, and explains why psychedelic research is important for the advancement of scientific knowledge.


  Pacific Standard "Philip Seymour Hoffman and a Simple Solution for America’s Heroin Addiction" by Ted Scheinman.

Pacific Standard looks at the overdose-related death of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, and points to research into the therapeutic use of ibogaine as a possible way to help people suffering from severe drug addiction. The article shares information about MAPS-sponsored ibogaine research taking place in New Zealand and Mexico and interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. “It has unique potential for helping people go through opiate withdrawal,” Doblin says.



January 30, 2014


  Medill Reports "First Medical Pot, Next Ecstasy Therapy?" by Elizabeth Wang.

Medill Reports of Northwestern University joins the conversation about MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD, highlighting the need for a more effective treatment for the 5.2 million Americans affected by PTSD each year. MAPS Clinical Investigator Dr. Michael Mithoefer is interviewed about the public response to research, the ineffectiveness of current PTSD treatments, and the fading stigma surrounding psychedelics. Mithoefer explains the importance of continuing research into the potential medical benefits of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, stating, “We don’t want to deprive patients of potentially life-saving treatment.”



January 28, 2014


  Motherboard "This Is Your Brain on Bitcoin" by Steven Melendez.

Motherboard highlights how and why MAPS began accepting bitcoin (BTC) donations in response to growing demand, how MAPS raised over $21,000 in bitcoins in less than two months, and why the bitcoin community is embracing charitable donations for scientific research on psychedelics and marijuana. Brian Brown explains, “As the Internet gave psychedelics a voice, bitcoins gave the Internet a wallet.”


  Psychotherapy Networker "Ecstasy in the Consulting Room" by Kathleen Smith.

Psychotherapy Networker shares progress from research into treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. The article covers the history of recent studies, details the therapeutic process, and reports on how therapist teams are being trained to conduct research in international locations including Israel, Canada, and Colorado. “One traumatized woman described herself as feeling lost in the underbrush,” recounts Clinical investigator Dr. Michael Mithoefer. “‘I didn’t know where I needed to go,’ she admitted. After some MDMA sessions, she said, ‘Now I have a map.’”



January 27, 2014


  Good Men Project "What Your Doctor Never Taught You About PTSD" by Jed Diamond, Ph.D..

Jed Diamond, Ph.D., writes for the Good Men Project about promising new treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), including Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) and MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. Diamond also recommends Manifesting Minds, the new MAPS Bulletin anthology.


  Examiner.com "Brad Burge on ‘Manifesting Minds’" by Jeffery Pritchett.

Jeffery Pritchett interviews Brad Burge of MAPS for Examiner.com about the wide range of content on the role of psychedelics in science, medicine, and culture in Manifesting Minds, the new anthology of articles from the tri-annual MAPS Bulletin. The article highlights the variety of contributors to Manifesting Minds, how psychedelics have helped as medical treatments for many people, and how psychedelics can creatively inspire the creation of technological inventions and creative insights.



January 23, 2014


  The Chicago Tribune "Obama Retreats from the Drug War" by Steve Chapman.

Steve Chapman of The Chicago Tribune‘s editorial board publishes an op-ed calling on President Obama to end the obstructive Public Health Service review process for medical marijuana research, especially considering Obama’s recent critical statements about the war on drugs.


  The Libertarian "Ibogaine Still Illegal in US, Despite Medical Potential" by Brendan Ferreri-Hanberry .

The Libertarian writes about the medical potential of ibogaine. The article covers its history, religious use, legality, and risks, and highlights MAPS’ ongoing research in New Zealand and Mexico into ibogaine’s potential in addiction treatment. Dr. Anwar Jeewa talks about the importance of a controlled setting for ibogaine experiences, explaining that ibogaine “has to be taken in the right setting and treatment has to be followed up with psychosocial care.”


  Mint Press News "Psychedelics Help Keep People From Returning To Prison: Study" by Katie Rucke.

Mint Press News shares the results of a new academic study analyzing the connection between psychedelic drug use and reduced criminal behavior. According to the researchers, the results suggest that psychedelics “may promote alcohol and other drug abstinence and prosocial behavior in a population with high rates of recidivism.”  Brad Burge of MAPS also gives commentary on the political history of drugs. “The legal status of drugs has historically had no relationship to scientific evidence about their risks,” he points out. “MAPS and other organizations in the psychedelic science field are changing that.”



January 22, 2014


  Scientific American "End the Ban on Psychoactive Drug Research"

Scientific American makes the case for additional public support for research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics and marijuana to treat severe mental illnesses and other medical conditions. The article explores the history of research into the potential medical benefits of LSD, MDMA, psilocybin, and marijuana, highlighting how these substances hold promise for treating people suffering PTSD, cluster headaches, obsessive compulsive disorder, and other conditions.



January 19, 2014


  Oped News "Mindful Molecules" by Craig K. Comstock.

Oped News reviews Manifesting Minds, the new MAPS Bulletin anthology featuring experts discussing the role of psychedelics in science, medicine, spirituality, and other areas. The review notes how psychedelic science is exploring the use of MDMA and other psychedelics for serious medical conditions including PTSD, to facilitate mystical and spiritual experiences, and improve the lives of healthy individuals.



January 17, 2014


  Time 4 Hemp "Veteran Sean Azzariti Talks about Marijuana for Treating PTSD on Time 4 Hemp" by Casper Leitch.

Time 4 Hemp interviews combat veteran Sean Azzariti, the first person to legally purchase recreational marijuana in Colorado. Azzariti describes how marijuana is a “life changer” for managing PTSD symptoms, and why it’s important to create conversations about the widespread issue of PTSD in veterans and others. Azzariti mentions the importance of MAPS’ work, stating, “It’s amazing to see the progress that we’re making with posttraumatic stress disorder outside of the normal pharmaceutical realm that we’re used to getting shoved down our throats.”


  International Business Times "Ecstasy a Potential Treatment for Anxiety and PTSD, Scientists Claim" by Hannah Osborne.

International Business Times reports on the completion of a new study by researchers at Imperial College London on the effect of MDMA in the brains of 25 healthy human volunteers. The results from the study, which was featured on UK Channel 4’s “Drugs Live” show last year, show that MDMA reduces blood flow in areas of the brain associated with processing emotions and memories. “The findings suggest possible clinical uses of MDMA in treating anxiety and PTSD,” says researcher Professor David Nutt. “But we need to be careful about drawing too many conclusions from a study in healthy volunteers. We would have to do studies in patients to see if we find the same effects.”


  Medline Plus "Could Ecstasy Help People With Anxiety, PTSD?" by Robert Preidt.

Medline Plus highlights a new study from Imperial College London on the effects of MDMA on the human brain. The study used fMRI brain scans to monitor how MDMA affected the brains of 25 healthy human volunteers as they processed positive and negative memories. The results show how MDMA changes the way the brain processes emotions, and add to the evidence for MDMA’s promise as a treatment for anxiety and PTSD.


  Imperial College London "Study Reveals How Ecstasy Acts on the Brain and Hints at Therapeutic Uses" by Sam Wong.

Imperial College London announces the results of their completed study of how MDMA works in the human brain. The study was led by Professors David Nutt and Val Curran, and portions of the study were previously televised on UK Channel 4’s “Drugs Live” program. The results show that volunteers were able to more easily process negative memories and had reduced blood flow in areas of the brain associated with memory and emotion. “In healthy volunteers, MDMA seems to lessen the impact of painful memories,” reports researcher Robin Carhart-Harris, PhD. “This fits with the idea that it could help patients with PTSD revisit their traumatic experiences in psychotherapy without being overwhelmed by negative emotions.”



January 15, 2014


  Motherboard "In a World of Opiate Addicts, the Internet Plays Doctor and Therapist" by Steven Melendez.

Motherboard highlights how sites including Bluelight and Opiophile support online harm reduction. Bluelight co-owner Sebastian’s Ghost talks about the history of Bluelight.org and how scientists use online information to gather information about drugs and drug use. Brad Burge of MAPS also speaks about the MAPS Forums on Bluelight and how services like Bluelight help create open dialogues about drugs.



January 13, 2014


  Psychedelic Frontier "MAPS Completes First New Therapeutic LSD Study in 40 Years"

Psychedelic Frontier announces that MAPS has completed the first new therapeutic study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy in over 40 years. The study focused on treating people with end-of-life anxiety and the results have been accepted for publication the peer-reviewed Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. The article shares quotes about the success of the research from study coordinator Dr. Peter Gasser and MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. In a public letter about the study, Gasser states, “We can show that LSD treatment can be safe when it is done in a carefully controlled clinical setting.”



January 7, 2014


  Santa Cruz Weekly "Santa Cruz Group Scrutinizes Powerful Psychedelic" by Maria Grusauskas.

Santa Cruz Weekly reports on current research into ibogaine-assisted therapy to treat opiate addiction. Ibogaine researcher Thomas Brown, Ph.D., and Brad Burge of MAPS are interviewed, sharing observations from the studies, information about how ibogaine works, and other addictions that may benefit from this research. Brown speaks about the success of this research, stating, “The ibogaine treatment gave people the sense that they could overcome the addiction.”


  Entheo Radio "Manifesting Minds: Psychedelic Therapy and Medical Cannabis" by Hugh T Alkemi.

Entheo Radio interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about the release of Manifesting Minds: A Review of Psychedelics in Science, Medicine, Sex, and Spirituality, the success of MAPS’ Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign to complete MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research, the current status surrounding clinical research proposals into the medical benefits of marijuana, and utilizing the internet to reach new supporters of psychedelic research.



January 3, 2014


  Leaf Science "Why Colorado’s First Legal Marijuana Buyer Was A War Veteran With PTSD"

Leaf Science announces that the first person to legally purchase recreational marijuana in Colorado was Sean Azzariti, a war veteran suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Azzariti explains how marijuana helps him manage the symptoms of PTSD, stating, “Cannabis saved me when PTSD was just overwhelming me.”


contract 2013 Media Articles...


December 30, 2013


  Medscape "Tuning In to Psychedelics’ Therapeutic Potential" by Nancy A. Melville.

Medscape explores the resurgence of research into the therapeutic potential of psychedelics including LSD, psilocybin, and MDMA. Through a series of interviews, prominent researchers explain how these substances may help people suffering from psychiatric disorders including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and depression.



December 23, 2013


  Arizona Capitol Times "Study of Marijuana Use for Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Remains Frozen" by Dr. Sue Sisley.

Dr. Sue Sisley sets the record straight about an AZ Central editorial repeating a misleading statement about the National Institute on Drug Abuse refusal to support medical marijuana research aiming to develop the whole marijuana plant into a prescription medicine. Dr. Sisley explains that NIDA has consistently prevented research, pointing to three separate FDA-approved studies to which NIDA has refused to sell marijuana.



December 17, 2013


  AlterNet "Why the Miraculous Healing Properties of Weed Are Driving a Decorated Veteran on a Mission" by April M. Short.

AlterNet shares the story of war veteran Perry Parks and his work to help veterans receive access to medical marijuana to help them cope with symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The article details Parks’ mission to provide an effective solution to treating symptoms of PTSD, and explains the science behind the effects of marijuana on people with PTSD. Brad Burge of MAPS also explains the obstacles facing clinical research into the potential medical benefits of marijuana.



December 16, 2013


  Midwest Real "Man Plans God Laughs"

Midwest Real interviews U.S. Army veteran Tim Amoroso about his experience returning home to the U.S. with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Amoroso details what it was like suffering from PTSD and explains his frustration with the current treatment methods offered by the Veterans Administration. He also recounts his experience of self-administering MDMA in a non-clinical setting and passionately expresses how his life has changed in great ways since.



December 13, 2013


  Medscape "Psychedelic Medicine: Worth the Trip?" by Professor David J. Nutt, MD, and Bret S. Stetka, MD.

Medscape hosts a slideshow presentation about the resurgence of research into the potential medical benefits of psychedelic substances. Written by Professor David J. Nutt, MD, and Bret S. Stetka, MD, this educational resource touches upon the history of psychedelics, details about the medical potential of MDMA, LSD, psilocybin, and ibogaine.



December 11, 2013


  Stoney Roads "Could MDMA Become a Legal Drug in the USA?"

Stoney Roads features a portion of the reddit Ask Me Anything session hosted by MAPS, looking at the timeline of research into treating posttraumatic stress disorder with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. In response to a question about making this treatment more widely available, Amy Emerson of MAPS explains, “At least two Phase 3 studies are typically required to prove safety and efficacy before permission for prescription use can be approved.”



December 10, 2013


  Less Than Three "MDMA Could Be Legally Prescribed by 2021" by Nathan Codd.

Less Than Three extracts information about MDMA research from the reddit Ask Me Anything session hosted by MAPS. The article highlights that MDMA-assisted psychotherapy may become a prescription treatment option for people suffering from PTSD in 2021 after more studies are completed.


  Crust Nation "MDMA in Phase 2 of Clinical Research as a Prescription Medication" by Ashley Cizek.

Crust Nation writes about the possibility of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy becoming a prescription treatment for PTSD by the year 2021. The article provides an in-depth overview of how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy affects people suffering from PTSD.



December 9, 2013


  The Commonwealth Club "Treating Trauma: Richard Rockefeller and Larry Brilliant at the Commonwealth Club" by MAPS.

Could MDMA effectively treat—maybe even cure—post-traumatic stress disorder (PSTD)? Dr. Richard Rockefeller says yes—or at least a very strong maybe. He says studies involving a small number of people with moderate to severe treatment-resistant PTSD found most subjects were improved after three treatments with medical-quality ecstasy. He’s cautiously optimistic about the prospect of psychedelic medicine, which he believes could heal the trauma in millions from Darfur to the former Yugoslavia. FDA-approved trials of therapy with ecstasy began in 2004, and Dr. Rockefeller believes the U.S. government will eventually approve using the drug for serious medical treatment if research on larger numbers bears out these early findings. What are the possible downsides to this research and what safeguards should be in place to govern it? Is this too good to be true? Join a conversation about the frontiers of brain science and potential for soothing the human condition.

Richard Rockefeller, M.D., Former Board Member, Rockefeller University; Former Chair, U.S. Advisory Board, Doctors Without Borders

In conversation with Larry Brilliant, M.D., MPH, President, Skoll Global Threats Fund; Co-founder, Seva Foundation

Special thanks to The Commonwealth Club of California.


  Religion Dispatches "Will Doctors Ever Prescribe Psychedelics?"

The University of Southern California’s Religion Dispatches covers the Ask Me Anything session hosted by MAPS Founder Rick Doblin and MAPS staff, focusing on the topic of spirituality. Responding to a question about the spiritual and therapeutic uses of LSD and ayahuasca, Doblin responded, “Spiritual experiences can occur in a hospital setting as well as in a shamanistic ritual.”


  The Dish "Ask Rick Doblin Anything: How To Experience Psychedelics?" by Andrew Sullivan.

The Dish asks MAPS Founder Rick Doblin the second in a series of reader-submitted questions about psychedelics. Doblin speaks about the unconscious mind as the guide for psychedelic experiences and emphasizes the importance of having someone nearby to provide a sense of safety.

Watch Part 1 of this video series here.


  Pulse Radio "MDMA Might Be A Prescription Drug By 2021" by Chandler Shortlidge.

Pulse Radio shares the reddit Ask Me Anything session hosted by MAPS, highlighting the status of research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy as a treatment for PTSD and how it could be a legal treatment by 2021.


  Fact Mag "MDMA Could Be Legally Prescribed Following Extensive Trials"

Fact Mag calls the recent reddit Ask Me Anything session hosted by MAPS “some of the most sober drug talk we’ve seen all year.” The brief article highlights researchers’ projections that MDMA-assisted psychotherapy could become a prescription treatment option for people diagnosed with PTSD by 2021.


  YourEDM "MDMA Could Be Legalized By 2021" by Ryan Railsback.

YourEDM explores MDMA-assisted psychotherapy becoming a prescription treatment for people suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder. The article details the timeline for current and future research into this treatment that must happen in order to make the therapy legally available.


  Mixmag "MDMA Could Become a Prescription Drug by 2021"

Mixmag highlights the Ask Me Anything session hosted on reddit by MAPS Founder Rick Doblin and the staff of MAPS. The topics of the article include the safety of marijuana, the myth of LSD “flashbacks,” and how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy research is helping people with PTSD.



December 8, 2013


  AZ Central "Lack of Pot for Research No Myth" by Dr. Sue Sisley.

Dr. Sue Sisley responds to an earlier AZ Central editorial echoing a misleading statement about the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s stance on medical marijuana research. Dr. Sisley points out NIDA’s refusal to provide research-approved marijuana to three separate FDA-approved studies, clarifying that NIDA continues to block research intended to develop the whole marijuana plant into a medicine.



December 6, 2013


  The Dish "Ask Rick Doblin Anything: The Myths Of Psychedelics" by Andrew Sullivan.

The Dish asks MAPS Founder Rick Doblin a reader-submitted question about the biggest myth surrounding psychedelic drugs. Clarifying a misconception about the validity of psychedelic experiences, he explains: “They are human experiences that we access through psychedelics, rather than psychedelic experiences that are somehow a foreign implant that are not actually real.”

Watch Part 2 of this video series here.



December 4, 2013


  AlterNet "10 Best Answers to Questions About Using Psychedelics" by April M. Short.

AlterNet highlights 10 of the best questions and answers from the AMA (Ask Me Anything) hosted by MAPS Founder Rick Doblin and MAPS staff on reddit. MAPS staff answered more than 75 out of over 2,000 questions asked by the reddit community. “This is one of the most exciting and inspiring parts of what we do,” says Brad Burge of MAPS. “Interacting with people who are actively trying to broaden their perspective about the risks and therapeutic benefits of psychedelics and marijuana.“


  Psychedelic Frontier "“Ask Me Anything” Reddit interview with Rick Doblin & MAPS"

Psychedelic Frontier collates the questions and answers from the AMA (Ask Me Anything) session hosted by MAPS Founder Rick Doblin and the staff of MAPS. The collection of answers touch upon research into the scientific and medical potential for psychedelics and marijuana; how these substances can produce therapeutic, spiritual, and enlightening experiences; and the future of psychedelics and marijuana.


  Being Bipolar Podcast "Being Bipolar: Ep. 154 – Psychedelics and Mental Health" by Bret Bernhoft.

The Being Bipolar Podcast interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about psychedelics and their role as tools for treating mental health issues. The discussion also addresses how MAPS is using the internet to maximize educational outreach and how psychedelics and marijuana are being seen more and more as healing tools.



December 3, 2013


  reddit "MAPS Hosts “Ask Me Anything” Interview on reddit" by MAPS.

On December 3, 2013, MAPS Founder Rick Doblin and the staff of MAPS participated in an AMA (Ask Me Anything) session hosted on reddit. The public interview remained on the home page of reddit throughout the entire day, generating over 2,000 questions and more than 75 answers about the scientific and medical potential of psychedelics and marijuana.



November 30, 2013


  Healthline "4 Illegal Drugs That Might Be Medicines" by Rachel Barclay.

Healthline explores the medical potential of several currently illegal drugs, including psilocybin, ketamine, and MDMA. Psychiatrist Michael Mithoefer, M.D., talks about MDMA as an adjunct to psychotherapy. He explains, “MDMA seems to give people a period of time in which they connect with their emotions but are not overwhelmed by them, a sense that ‘this is difficult, but I can do it.’”



November 22, 2013


  Reality Sandwich "Another Green World: Psychedelics and Ecology" by Daniel Pinchbeck.

Reality Sandwich publishes an excerpt from Manifesting Minds, the upcoming anthology of articles from the MAPS Bulletin, in which Daniel Pinchbeck reflects on the relationship between psychedelics and ecology. “In the same way that we garden plants, teacher plants like ayahuasca seem to garden us when we ingest them. During shamanic sessions, people often get direct messages about how to transform their lives.”



November 21, 2013


  WNPR "The Agony and Utility of Ecstasy" by Chion Wolf.

WNPR interviews Brad Burge of MAPS along with University of Connecticut Professor C. Michael White, Dr. John Halpern of Harvard, Sam Tracy of Students for Sensible Drug Policy, and EDM producer Tommie Sunshine in a special segment focusing on the risks, benefits, popular uses, and public health implications of MDMA.



November 20, 2013


  City Pages "How Ayahuasca Can Revolutionize Psychotherapy" by Olivia LaVecchia.

City Pages explores the world of the psychedelic brew ayahuasca, addressing its use for healing people in ceremonial contexts and in scientific research. The article highlights the potential of ayahuasca as a treatment for addiction, depression, and end-of-life anxiety, and shares interviews with Dennis McKenna, Gabor Mate, Brian Rush, and MAPS Founder Rick Doblin. Speaking about the need for more research into the potential medical benefits of ayahuasca, Brian Rush states, “This is a potential approach that a lot of people have some confidence in, and at least enough confidence to say, ‘We need more studies. We need to know more.’”



November 14, 2013


  Entheo Radio "Manifesting Minds with Brad Burge"

Entheo Radio interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about the excitement surrounding the launch of MAPS’ Indiegogo fundraising campaign to fund MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for veterans with PTSD, the expansion of global interest in ayahuasca, how media portrayal of psychedelics can improve, and the upcoming January 7 release of Manifesting Minds, an all-new anthology of articles from the MAPS Bulletin.



November 11, 2013


  Huffington Post Live "Marijuana Is Helping Our Vets Cope With War" by Josh Zepps.

Huffington Post Live interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin, Amy Rising, Ricardo Andre Pereyda, and Dr. Raphael Mechoulam about marijuana for treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans. Doblin details the current status of research initiatives focused on turning marijuana into a medicine, speaks about the increase in public support for medical marijuana, and explains the differences in treating PTSD symptoms with medical marijuana compared to MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, which aims at more lasting changes.



November 8, 2013


  SBS "Treating Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder with Ecstasy"

SBS interviews Rachel Hope about how her life changed after participating in MAPS’ clinical trial of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD. Martin Williams, founder of Psychedelic Research in Science & Medicine (PRISM), talks about his hopes to bring similar research to Australia, stating, “We are only interested in working with pure MDMA, the effects of which in participants are well categorised and the safety profile is well established.” Rachel Hope describes the impact and effectiveness of this treatment, saying, “My life is incredible,” she says. “I was grateful to just get a little relief but I’m cured of PTSD.”



November 5, 2013


  MAPS "PRESS RELEASE:  Smoke Signals and Acid Dreams: An Evening with Martin Lee and MAPS in Santa Cruz"

Santa Cruz, Calif.—The Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), a non-profit research and educational organization based in Santa Cruz, Calif., is hosting a free event at the Pacific Cultural Center on Friday, November 22nd at 7:00 PM. Smoke Signals and Acid Dreams: An Evening with Martin Lee, is an evening lecture and open discussion focusing on the latest research on the potential benefits, as well as the risks, of medical marijuana and psychedelic psychotherapy.

Download the press release.



November 1, 2013


  Reason "Psychedelic Science: Magic Mushrooms" by Alex Manning & Paul Feine.

Reason sheds light on the resurgence of scientific research into psilocybin mushrooms by interviewing psychedelic researchers Robin Carhart-Harris of Imperial College London and Roland Griffiths of Johns Hopkins University at Psychedelic Science 2013. They speak about the effects of psilocybin on the brain, their research results, and what the implications of this research may be.



October 26, 2013


  International Drug Policy Reform Conference "The Future of Psychedelic Research: What’s Next?" by MAPS.

We are now in the midst of a psychedelic research renaissance, with clinical studies under way at top medical schools and research institutes worldwide. How might psychedelics redefine medicine and science, and how can we effectively reintegrate them into contemporary society? What new directions will the future hold? And what are some post-prohibition models for regulation that are already being envisioned and implemented?

Featuring Gabby Agin-Liebes, Jag Davies, Rick Doblin, Albert Garcia, Ingmar Gorman, Joshua Wickerham



October 25, 2013


  International Drug Policy Reform Conference "Is the Drug War Blocking the Best PTSD Treatments?" by MAPS.

This interdisciplinary panel and discussion will focus on how psychedelic-assisted therapy, medical marijuana, and occupational therapy are helping some veterans for whom conventional treatments are not working. What does a federally approved clinical marijuana study look like for PTSD? What does an MDMA-assisted therapy study protocol look like? How does marijuana help de-escalate PTSD triggers? And what is going on in Congress to address this issue at the federal level?

Featuring Shawn Majors, Alexander Neumeister, Marcela Ot’alora, Bill Piper, Steph Sherer, and Sue Sisley


  International Drug Policy Reform Conference "What Can Psychedelics Teach Us About Drug Misuse and Addiction?" by MAPS.

Ayahuasca, ibogaine and psilocybin are helping people face death, cope with trauma, and overcome addiction to alcohol, tobacco, opiates and other drugs. What can we learn from the growing body of scientific research? Can these drugs revolutionize addiction treatment? And how can we enhance the benefits and reduce the harms of psychedelic drug use outside of treatment settings?

Featuring Albert Garcia, John Harrison, Stefanie Jones, Philippe Lucas, Linnae Ponté, and Andrew Tatarsky


  International Drug Policy Reform Conference "Communications Strategies:  Psychedelics as the “New Pot”?" by MAPS.

Public discourse around both marijuana and psychedelic drugs has shifted rapidly over the last decade, especially the past few years. Is that where the similarities end? In what ways have marijuana and psychedelics each been re-branded? To what extent can we draw lessons from recent marijuana reform victories when it comes to other drugs? And what are the opportunities and pitfalls for changing hearts and minds about marijuana and psychedelic policies moving forward?

Featuring Tom Angell, Brad Burge, Jag Davies, Aaron Houston, Jason Salzman, and Anna Szostek



October 24, 2013


  International Drug Policy Reform Conference "Research Impurities: What Do Politics Have to Do With Drug Research?" by MAPS.

Drug research is highly politicized. The National Institute on Drug Abuse, which funds 85% of addiction research worldwide, has been accused of using its influence to advance its political agenda. How do politics influence what and who gets studied, the measures used to evaluate drug effects, and the conclusions that are drawn? What are the fundamental biases inherent in the current research environment? How do political, financial and institutional constraints create gaps in our knowledge and shape core myths that have become taken-for-granted “truths” about drugs and people who use drugs? And what can researchers do to overcome some of these problems?

Featuring Shaquita Borden, Rick Doblin, Robert Grantfield, Carl Hart, Sheigla Murphy, Lynn Paltrow, and Sue Sisley



October 23, 2013


  OracleTalk "Voices of Tomorrow: Giancarlo Canavesio On His Transformational New Film ‘Neurons to Nirvana’" by Erik Bucci.

OracleTalk interviews Giancarlo Canavesio about Neurons to Nirvana, his newest documentary about how scientists are studying the medical benefits of various psychedelics and getting exciting results. While speaking about charitable and personal activities, Canavesio talks about why he supports MAPS and reflects on the vision of MAPS Founder Rick Doblin.



October 21, 2013


  UPI "New Study Will See if MDMA Can Help Autistic Adults with Social Anxiety" by Evan Bleier.

UPI shares a major update about research into MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in autistic adults, announcing that the Research Advisory Panel of California and the Institutional Review Board at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center/Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute has approved the new MAPS-sponsored study. The study will be led by Charles Grob, M.D., and Alicia Danforth, Ph.D.


  The Raw Story "California Science Review Panel Approves Study on MDMA Treatment for Autistic Adults" by Eric W. Dolan.

The Raw Story announces MAPS’ new study into MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in autistic adults that recently received approval from the Research Advisory Panel of California and the Institutional Review Board at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center/Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute. Researchers will study the therapeutic effects of MDMA-assisted therapy in 12 autistic adults, once the study has final approval from the Drug Enforcement Administration.


  Opposing Views "Major Committees Approve Study To Give Ecstasy To Autistic Adults With Social Anxiety" by Sarah Rae Fruchtnicht.

Opposing Views covers the Research Advisory Panel of California and the Institutional Review Board at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center/Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute’s approval of MAPS’ new research into MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum. The study received approval from the Food and Drug Administration in April and is awaiting approval from the Drug Enforcement Agency in addition to further funding.


  Shalom Life "Should MDMA be Legalized for Medicinal Purposes?" by Gideon Greenbaum-Shinder.

Shalom Life interviews MAPS Clinical Research Associate Mimi Peleg about her role in helping scientific research into the medical benefits of MDMA and marijuana take place in Israel. Peleg speaks about the high rate of PTSD among Israelis, the effectiveness of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD, and the future of medical marijuana.



October 20, 2013


  The Los Angeles Times "In New York, Late Nights Are Fueled by Party Drug Molly" by Alana Semuels.

The Los Angeles Times explores the rise in popularity of the drug known as Molly in New York and other areas, interviewing recreational users about their experiences with the drug. The article explains that Molly is often mixed with other substances and is usually not pure MDMA. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin reflects on the Molly trend in popular music culture. “In this digital age, people want human emotion, they want to celebrate communally,” Doblin said. “People are hungry for this type of experience.”


  Playboy "Molly is the New Club Drug, But What’s In It?" by Frank Owen & Lera Gavin.

Playboy includes commentary from MAPS Founder Rick Doblin in an article about the history of MDMA, from therapeutic tool to dance floor drug and back again.



October 18, 2013


  Huffington Post Live "Let’s Get Synthetic" by Ricky Camilleri.

Huffington Post Live host Ricky Camilleri interviews MAPS Founder and Executive Director Rick Doblin and VICE Science Editor Hamilton Morris about the current state of research chemicals, how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can help people suffering from PTSD, and how factual information about drugs is one of the best ways to promote harm reduction.



October 17, 2013


  Katie "What You Need to Know About Molly" by Katie Couric.

Katie Couric invites MDMA expert Dr. Julie Holland and former FBI agent Brad Garrett to clarify information about the emerging drug Molly, focusing on how it is not a pure version of MDMA while explaining the risks associated with taking an unknown substance from the streets. Holland explains the therapeutic value of MDMA, noting, “In its pure form, with a doctor supervising, you can give it to somebody. There’s a study with posttraumatic stress disorder where they’re giving MDMA to veterans.” Holland adds, “In that setting, it’s fairly safe, and there may even be some benefit.”



October 11, 2013


  The Subjective Perspective Show "The Subjective Perspective Show Interviews Brad Burge of MAPS"

The Subjective Perspective Show interviews Brad Burge of MAPS about the legitimization of psychedelic research, why he supports medical marijuana, and how MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can help people overcome treatment-resistant posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).



October 10, 2013


  CMC Forum "James Fadiman: Psychedelic Research and Applications" by Manav Kohli.

CMC Forum interviews psychedelic researcher James Fadiman, Ph.D., about exciting results from his career studying psychedelics. They investigate the promising results from research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD, and the creative insights that psychedelic research could provide for scientists and doctors to advance their fields of study.



October 8, 2013


  Tablet Magazine "Can Ecstasy, Primarily Known as a Club Drug, Help People Suffering From Trauma?" by Jennifer Bleyer.

Tablet Magazine checks in on psychedelic research in Israel, sharing an inspiring testimonial from a 70-year-old Israeli named Josef, who suffered from PTSD for decades until participating in our ongoing Israeli study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. The article also profiles MAPS Founder Rick Doblin, detailing his career aspirations, his family life, creating MAPS, and why Israel was selected as a location for MDMA research.



October 7, 2013


  The Raw Story "‘Transforming Medicine’ Mini Documentary Profiles Psychedelic Research Conference" by Eric W. Dolan.

The Raw Story showcases Transforming Medicine, the new mini-documentary about psychedelic science. The article quotes Gabor Mate, MD, who shares his stance on how to efficiently engage others in discussions about the medical benefits of psychedelics, and reminds viewers to discover over 80 videos of educational content presented at Psychedelic Science 2013, now available at psychedelicscience.org.



October 2, 2013


  Jewish Journal "Light-Up Nation: What Israel Can Teach America About Medical Marijuana" by SImone Wilson.

Jewish Journal investigates the history of medical marijuana in Israel. The article highlights Israel’s large legal medical marijuana farm, how the drug has helped Israeli Defense Forces veterans treat their PTSD, and how medical marijuana fits into Israel’s health care system. Dr. Alan Shackelford summarizes the importance of this research, noting, “We have an obligation as a medical community to study cannabis so that we can understand how it works, and more effectively decide what cannabinoids are most effective for what, and at what dose.”


  The Psychiatric Times "From the Streets to the Rx Pad: Do Party Drugs Have a Place in the Medical Office?" by Heidi Anne Duerr, MPH.

The Psychiatric Times speaks with Andrew Penn, Associate Clinical Professor at the University of California, San Francisco about his presentation at the US Psychiatric and Mental Health Congress regarding the therapeutic potential of MDMA, marijuana, and ketamine. Penn highlights the promising results of MAPS’ first completed study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD, details the variety of conditions that can be treated by medical marijuana, and urges clinicians to provide harm reduction advice to patients to promote safe drug use.



October 1, 2013


  Wired "Timothy Leary’s Transformation From Scientist to Psychedelic Celebrity" by Greg Miller.

Wired gives an overview of psychedelic researcher Timothy Leary’s archive of written papers, research, and experiences. The article points to the prominent of researchers and doctors that presented completed study results at Psychedelic Science 2013, and interviews MAPS Founder Rick Doblin about his studies of Leary’s early work and legacy. “Doblin says it’s not fair to blame the decades-long lull in psychedelic research entirely on Leary,” writes Greg Miller of Wired. “‘He deserves some condemnation, but he also made a fundamental contribution to the scientific study of psychedelics,’ Doblin said.”



September 30, 2013


  Midwest Real "Brad Burge of MAPS on Midwest Real"

Midwest Real engages Brad Burge of MAPS in a discussion about the path to legitimizing psychedelics, how the media sensationalizes negative stories about drugs, and about how psychedelic harm reduction and clinical research are changing public perceptions around psychedelics.



September 26, 2013


  Tikkun "PTSD Relief in Israel Through MDMA and Cannabis Research" by Mimi Peleg.

Researcher and advocate Mimi Peleg reports for Tikkun on psychedelic and medical marijuana research in Israel, sharing successes she’s witnessed, personal anecdotes about her work studying new treatments for PTSD using marijuana and MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, and how this research can shape the future. Peleg notes the prevalence of PTSD in Israeli citizens, highlights the progress and process of MAPS’ study into treating PTSD with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in Israel, and looks forward to a new study of treating PTSD with medical marijuana. Peleg emphasizes, “Cannabis and MDMA education and research in Israel suffers from a severe lack of funds and this is where any one of us anywhere can be of tremendous help.”



September 20, 2013


  The Atlantic "Electronic Dance Music’s Love Affair With Ecstasy: A History" by P. Nash Jenkins.

The Atlantic inspects the relationship between electronic dance music (EDM) concerts and the recreational use of MDMA, diving into the origins, culture, and rise in popularity of EDM culture. MAPS Founder and Executive Director Rick Doblin shares insights about the spiritual aspect of MDMA use, the impurity of street drugs claiming to be MDMA, and his thoughts about why the electronic music scene embraces MDMA.



September 19, 2013


  The Arizona Daily Wildcat "Medical Marijuana Research Sees Opposition" by Meggie Kessler.

The Arizona Daily Wildcat takes a glimpse at the harsh political landscape for medical marijuana research in Arizona. MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley speaks about the government obstacles surrounding our FDA-approved study of medical marijuana for 50 combat veterans suffering from PTSD.  Dr. Sisley explains, “[Federal regulators] decided that, in their heads, marijuana has no medical benefit. That’s why they put it as a Schedule I drug. People in law enforcement – the DEA – for some reason they’re allowed to make a decision about the medical properties of this plant. The DEA should have no business defining what class drugs are placed in.”



September 12, 2013


  AlterNet "Medical Marijuana Industry Sprouts Up in Israel" by April M. Short.

AlterNet dives deeply into Israel’s successful medical marijuana program, which effectively provides Israeli citizens with effective medicines while allowing scientists to conduct research into the medical benefits of the drug. MAPS Clinical Research Associate Mimi Peleg speaks with Alternet about the history of medical marijuana in Israel, how she prepares patients for treatment, and how Israel’s stance on medical marijuana is an example of how countries like the United States can move forward with medical marijuana.



September 9, 2013


  News21 "Veterans Try Alternative Treatments from Yoga to Marijuana" by Bonnie Campo and Jake Stein.

News21 takes an intimate look at the lives of veterans suffering from PTSD who are finding that alternative treatment methods including yoga and medical marijuana are more helpful for them than standard medications. In the report, MAPS-sponsored researcher Dr. Sue Sisley talks about about the growing need and continued resistance to medical marijuana research for veterans. Sisley notes, “Anytime you dare to ask the government to allow you to do a study on the efficacy of marijuana, it’s going to get blocked. Science should never be shackled by politics.”



September 6, 2013


  ABC News "A Music Festival Where Drugs Aren’t the Enemy" by Ted Hesson.

ABC News explores how the decriminalization of drugs in Portugal allows events like Boom Festival to provide services like KosmiCare, a dedicated space for harm reduction. By working closely with medical staff and police, KosmiCare helps festival attendees feel more comfortable in a potentially overwhelming environment. MAPS Founder Rick Doblin explains, “It creates a whole climate of comfort at an event.” He continues, “I think that there’s a general sense the U.S. has been on a punitive, counterproductive approach, and people around the world are exploring different options.”



September 5, 2013


  Washington Times "‘Molly’ is Not Your Friend. It is a Potentially Deadly Drug" by Paul Mountjoy.

The Washington Times explores the clinical potential of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD while reporting on the safety of a tainted version of MDMA known as “Molly.” The article details how the government’s classification of MDMA is preventing additional research into its potential positive and negative effects.



September 4, 2013


  Mint Press News "Are Psychedelic Drugs The New Marijuana?" by Katie Rucke.

Mint Press News sheds light on the resurgence of psychedelic research, educating their readers about the role of psychedelics in neuroscience, medicine, and psychology. The article details research into MDMA-assisted therapy as a treatment for social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum and lists a number of research papers signifying additional medical benefits stemming from psychedelic research.


  2ser "Treating Post Traumatic Stress with…Ecstacy?"

Australian radio program 2ser discusses the possibility that Australia could be the next country to welcome research into MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treating PTSD. The show’s hosts explore the chances of bringing MDMA research to Australia, especially as a way to help heal many veterans suffering from treatment-resistant PTSD.



September 3, 2013


  TIME.com "Concert Deaths: Four Myths About the Drug Molly" by Maia Szalavitz.

TIME.com dispels some common myths about “Molly” in the wake of several recent deaths from the tainted drug. The article highlights that MDMA is being researched for its potential to be used as a therapeutic-adjunct for treating PTSD and distinguishes between the scientific and recreational uses of MDMA. Author Maia Szalavitz explains, “Short-term, highly monitored use in treatment can’t compare to taking an illegal drug of uncertain purity in a chaotic environment among strangers.”




Full timeline of all prior years of MAPS in the Media
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