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MAPS BULLETIN
MAPS Bulletin Summer 2014: Research Edition
 
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MAPS is a 501(c)(3) non-profit research and educational organization. Our fiscal year runs from June 1 to May 31. MAPS IRS Form 990 is posted with the annual report starting with FY 1998. For additional financial and legal information, please see Articles, Bylaws, and 501(c)(3).

contractFY 2013 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 2012-2013 June 1, 2012 - May 31, 2013  
 
  Introduction
 

This year-end financial report from the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) is a key element of our commitment to transparency and clear communications about our finances.This report depicts our year-long focus on strategically and efficiently leveraging resources that our donors have so generously empowered us to use towards realizing our shared mission of transforming psychedelics and marijuana into FDA-approved prescription medications. The medicalization of psychedelics and marijuana is an essential part of our larger mission to facilitate the mainstreaming of psychedelics into our culture for a wide range of beneficial uses with associated harm reduction practices.

As I write this report, we’ve just completed an independent audit of our financial information for the third year in a row. These audits are part of a concerted effort to raise funds from major foundations and government agencies, both of which require such audits.The audits are also helpful for individual donors and family foundations that feel more comfortable knowing that MAPS’ books are independently audited. In FY 2013–14, and in the years to come, we must expand our sources of funding so we can generate the resources needed to complete our Phase 2 studies of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD, to initiate and fund the Phase 3 multi-site MDMA/PTSD studies, and to fund our other research and educational activities.

What follows is a comprehensive reporting and discussion of MAPS’ financials for FY 2012–13 (June 1, 2012 to May 31, 2013). Should you have any questions about anything in this fi- nancial report, you are invited to inquire at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

—Rick Doblin, Ph.D.

View our Complete Audited Financial Statements for FY 2012-13

Download MAPS IRS Form 990 (2012)

 
  Income
 

MAPS’ income in Fiscal Year 2012–13 was $2.4 million, expenses were $2.14 million, increase in net assets was $264,000, and total assets at year-end were $6.9 million. Of these assets, $5.5 million are in a Board Restricted Fund.This Fund was created last year, from a bequest received from the estate of Board member Ashawna Hailey. We restricted $200,000 as funding of last resort for a study of MDMA for the treatment of social anxiety in adults on the autism spectrum, with the balance ($5.3 million) restricted to our Phase 3 studies of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. We restricted most of Ashawna’s bequest to Phase 3 MDMA/PTSD studies in order to lever- age the bequest to help raise the additional $11 million of the estimated $16 million that will be required for Phase 3.With such a substantial percent of the Phase 3 budget already in hand, there is an increased likelihood that we will be able to motivate donors to fund the remaining costs since reaching the goal isn’t so intimidating. In addition, reserving $5.3 million of Ashawna’s bequest for Phase 3 should make it easier for MAPS to raise the roughly $2.5 million estimated to complete Phase 2 since we have increased our ability to fully fund Phase 3.

We began FY 2012–13 with a budget projecting that we would spend almost half a million dollars more than we knew we could raise from existing sources. Nevertheless, we decided that it was essential to go full speed ahead with our research and we were willing to draw down much of our unrestricted reserves. However, through a series of fortuitous events, we managed to end FY 2012–13 in the black and raised $264,000 more than we spent.

Among the leading reasons for this remarkable outcome in FY 2012–13 are that: Peter Lewis donated $402,000 to MAPS, almost double his gift of the prior fiscal year; Joby Pritzker donated $200,000, twice what we had estimated; we earned over $130,000 from the Psychedelic Science Conference when we’d estimated a break-even; we obtained over $100,000 from first time major donors; and we invested Ashawna’s bequest with the San Francisco Foundation which increased our assets in value by about $246,000. Finally, and the only unfortunate aspect to this financial surplus, is that a substantial amount of research expenses were delayed due to slower than anticipated approvals from regulatory agencies. These anticipated expenses will be incurred in future years. At the time I’m writing this report, we’ve obtained all the regulatory approvals we’ve been seeking for our international series of Phase 2 MDMA/PTSD pilot studies. We’re projecting MDMA-related research direct expenditures for FY 2013–14 of about $1.3 million, almost double our FY 2012–13 expenditures.

REVENUE SUMMARY

MAPS’ total income for FY 2012–13 was $2.4 million, of which $1,544,535 (64%), was contributed support. MAPS received $1,272,777, from 22 individuals and family foundations giving $9,000 or more, and $118,944 from 47 donors giving between $1,000 and $10,000. An additional $92,373 was received from 1,145 individuals giving under $1,000.These donations of less than $1,000 are a crucial part of MAPS’ success—they help us cover our operational expenses, are part of building the MAPS community, lead to word-of-mouth contacts with new donors, and are the way donors began to get to know MAPS by enabling them to evaluate our work before they make a larger gift. In addition, $60,441, worth of auction items, professional time, and event venues were donated to help MAPS’ fundraising and clinical activities.

Sales of books, art, clothes and other items totaled $73,649. Event Income of $541,804 is from all our events this year, primarily from the Psychedelic Science Conference. For all events, income sources are: $506,227 tickets; $10,929 commission on art sales; $4,775 vendor fees, and $15,775 auction income. Total Psychedelic Science Conference revenue was $589,298, from these sources, plus sponsorships and other miscellaneous income. Investment income includes $246,558, net of fees, from our assets invested at the San Francisco Foundation. Our fiscal sponsorship revenue of $23,546 is re-granted to the groups that raise the funds, minus a small administrative fee.

 
  Expenses
 

MAPS’ expenses in Fiscal Year 2012–13, totaled $2.14 million. 37% was spent on research; 35% on education, including the Psychedelic Science Conference; 20% was management and general operations; and 8% was spent on the cost of fundraising.

Research is MAPS’ primary activity. Our focus has been, and will continue to be, on our MDMA Research ($796,107). Our four main studies for MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for the treatment of PTSD take place in Vancouver, Canada; Beer Yaakov, Israel; Boulder, Colorado; and Charleston, South Carolina. Over half our expenses for these studies are for personnel. These include MAPS internal staff: the clinical director, research associates, information specialists, data coordinators, and statistical analysis. Site staff includes the principal and co-investigators, independent raters, overnight physicians, attendants, and study coordinators. In our Veterans study ($262,555 in FY 2012–13), staff and contractors fees are 64% of the expenses. Other significant expenses are for subject travel and lodging (18%), and facilities (13%). Most studies follow a similar pattern.

In addition to the direct study expenses, we had MDMA study-related program expenses including the staff costs of video data storage and streaming systems development, budgeting, contracting, and meetings ($49,216), the costs of developing the treatment manual ($10,260), the training of therapists ($8,166), and blinded therapist adherence training ($4,829). We also have the costs of MDMA study-related supervision of therapists, presentation of our data at conferences, and speaking to the media ($68,859).

Our Clinical Research General costs ($89,448) are primarily staff costs related to developing the infrastructure needed for our clinical trials, including work with communications and fundraising departments, staff professional development and conferences, and video streaming and statistical software.The clinical research general expenses are related to our various MDMA studies.

Expenses in FY 2012–13 for ibogaine research were dedicated to finalizing our studies in Mexico ($7,653), and New Zealand ($2,914). FY 2012–13 LSD expenses ($26,294) were used to complete the study. In FY 2013–14 we will publish our LSD end of life article in a peer-reviewed journal, and develop a protocol for LSD and creativity. Our Marijuana/PTSD study is still in the protocol approval process. FY 2012–13 funds ($6,214) were used to obtain FDA and IRB approval, and FY2013–14 funds ($2,000) will be used to continue our work to secure marijuana from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).

Education ($728,829) expenses include events, and publications and communications programs. Events expense ($505,834) includes the Psychedelic Science Conference, our largest non-clinical activity for the year, held in April 2013 ($445,743 in FY 2012–13). Over 1,900 people attended the conference and associated events, which presented over 100 speakers from more than 30 countries. Our Zendo Project psychedelic harm reduction program ($28,727) offered services at festivals in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada; at BOOM in Portugal; AfrikaBurn, South Africa; and Envision, Costa Rica; and produced a Harm Reduction manual, available for free on the MAPS website. In addition, MAPS staff attended more than 18 events that others produced, and provided speakers, exhibits, sales of books and MAPS bulletins, and free distribution of clinical protocols, and articles from peer-reviewed journals.

Publications ($222,995) included three editions of the Bulletin, the development and management of our comprehensive website on psychedelic research, the writing and distribution of 12 monthly e-newsletters, and the implementation of spirited public relations campaigns that share current research on psychedelics and marijuana with TV, print and online journalists internationally. MAPS also published two books, Claudio Naranjo’s The Healing Journey, and Torsten Passie’s Healing with Entactogens.

Our Fiscal Sponsorship program ($23,702) provided fundraising assistance to organizations that are in close alignment with our mission and values, including: Bluelight,Yawanawa ayahuasca project, WAMM, and the Temple of Whollyness at Burning Man 2013.

Fundraising costs are primarily for staff, direct mail, donor research and database costs, MAPS produced events, and travel and lodg- ing for individual donor visits. Operations are the unglamorous but necessary unallocated expenses of staffing, occupancy, taxes, fees, ac- counting, information technology, equipment, supplies, and postage.

 
  Assets
 

For a complete discussion of MAPS’ 2012-2013 fiscal year see our Winter 2013 Annual Financial Report.

 
  Projections
 

For a complete discussion of MAPS’ 2012-2013 fiscal year see our Winter 2013 Annual Financial Report.

 
  Comparative results
 

MAPS faces a major fundraising challenge in FY 2013–14 and beyond. Although our revenue has grown over the last few years, our clinical expenses may outpace our fundraising for the first time. We have all the regulatory approvals required for our MDMA/PTSD studies in Israel, Canada, and two in the US. We’re predicting that we may more than double our MDMA/PTSD research expenses to an estimated $1.3 million of direct expenses in FY 2013–14. At the start of FY 2013–14, we estimate that we need about $750,000 in new revenue in order to breakeven. With the success of our research, our financial needs to develop MDMA-assisted psychotherapy into a prescription medicine in the treatment of PTSD will keep increasing.

Nevertheless, MAPS’ fundraising goals for FY 2013–14 are attainable.The need for research into the healing potential of psychedelics is profound, we are building a track record of success, and interest in our work is growing.

MAPS’ mission has always been ambitious. As you contemplate your charitable donations, we offer this detailed report on our income and expenses so you can see exactly where our money comes in and where it goes. Please consider making a generous donation and mentioning MAPS in your will. What was once forbidden, even for research, is now being studied and will, with your help, become an accepted and mainstream option for healing, inspiration, and spirituality.


contractFY 2012 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 2011-2012 June 1, 2011 - May 31, 2012  
 
  Introduction
 

Our year-end Financial Report from the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) is a key element in our commitment to transparency. This report complements our year-long focus on strategically and efficiently leveraging the resources that our donors have so generously empowered us to use towards realizing our shared mission of transforming psychedelics and marijuana into FDA-approved prescription medications.

Our goal with this Financial Report is to enable MAPS supporters and the public to see our priorities in action through how we allocate our limited funds. Should you have any questions about any items in this financial report, you are invited to inquire at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

As I write this report, we are in the midst of having our books reviewed for the second year in a row by a team of independent auditors. We’re paying for these audits on our own initiative with the hope to eventually obtain financial support from major foundations or government research agencies, which require audited financials as a prerequisite for funding. We’re anticipating needing to raise ever-larger amounts as we work to complete our Phase 2 pilot studies of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD, then to initiate the pivotal Phase 3 multi-site studies required to prove safety and efficacy prior to FDA approval for prescription use. Similarly, though with an in-house team, we’re monitoring the data in our Phase 2 studies to build organizational capacity for operating at the level of professionalism and accountability needed for our pharmaceutical drug development research.

What follows is a comprehensive reporting and discussion of MAPS’ income and expenses for FY 11-12 (June 1, 2011 to May 31, 2012).

Download MAPS IRS Form 990 (2011).

 

 
  Income
 

MAPS’ income in FY 11-12 was $7.37 million, expenses were $1.99 million, changes in net assets were $5.38 million, and total assets at the end of FY 11-12 were $6.54 million.  This compares to income in FY 10-11 of $1.47 million, expenses of $1.38 million, changes in net assets of $90,000, and total assets at the end of FY 10-11 of $1.16 million.

The most significant financial development in FY 11-12, and also the saddest, was the bequest that MAPS received from the estate of Board of Directors member Ashawna Hailey, amounting to an estimated $5.5 million. This is an estimated number because, according to auditing procedures that we are adopting this year, the full estimated amount of the bequest needs to be allocated in the year the bequest was received. This is the case even when not all the funds are actually disbursed in that fiscal year, as with Ashawna’s bequest since it will take some time to sell all of the assets. MAPS actually received $3.2 million of the bequest in FY 11-12, and has received another $800,000 so far in FY 12-13. In addition, some of Ashawna’s assets are not liquid and may eventually be sold for less than book value.

MAPS’ change in net assets in FY 11-12 was $5.38 million, about $170,000 less than the $5.5 million booked from Ashawna’s bequest. Without Ashawna’s bequest, MAPS had a net loss of about $170,000. However, MAPS would otherwise have received $200,000 from Ashawna for unrestricted operational expenses. In the absence of the bequest but with that $200,000, MAPS would have brought in about $30,000 more than we spent in FY 11-12.

The amount Ashawna bequeathed to MAPS represents half (4/8) of his charitable bequests, with another 1/8 given to the Marijuana Policy Project (which they used to help legalize marijuana in Colorado), another 1/8 to the Drug Policy Alliance (for drug policy reform), another 1/8 for the American Civil Liberties Union (for drug policy reform), and the remaining 1/8 to the San Jose Second Harvest food bank. The recipients of Ashawna’s bequest illustrate the direct link he saw between scientific research with psychedelics and marijuana and drug policy reform.

Ashawna cared most about MAPS’ work developing the therapeutic use of MDMA. As a result, MAPS’ Board of Directors has chosen to restrict $200,000 of his donation to start a new study of MDMA in adults on the Autism Spectrum and the remaining $5.3 million to our Phase 3 studies of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD, which will start within the next three years at a cost we currently estimated to be $10-$15 million. There’s a wide range of estimated Phase 3 expenses since the costs will depend on the design of the Phase 3 studies, which will be determined at an End-of-Phase 2 meeting with the FDA in two to three years. By restricting Ashawna’s bequest in this manner, our goal is to leverage his donation in the most efficient way possible. Raising the remaining funds for Phase 3 will be easier since we will already have a significant fraction of the funds we need, so we hope donors will see that it is not such an insurmountable sum to raise. In addition, we reason that reserving funds for Phase 3 will make it easier to raise the roughly $3 million we estimate we still need to complete Phase 2, since the chances we’ll be able to conduct and complete our Phase 3 studies is now more realistic. 

In addition to Ashawna’s bequest, MAPS received $350,000 in one-time net income in FY 11-12 from the sale of a remainder interest in a home in La Jolla, Calif., which MAPS received in a bequest from Eric Bass in FY 94-95. MAPS also received $75,000 in FY 11-12 from a bequest from Larry Thomas. MAPS also received $350,000 from Larry Thomas’s bequest in FY 10-11 and will receive a final payment of about $25,000 in FY 12-13, making the total value of Larry Thomas’s bequest about $450,000. The three largest donations in MAPS’ 26-year history have all come from bequests. For those reading this report, please consider adding MAPS to your wills.

In addition to the bequests from Ashawna and Larry Thomas, MAPS received most of our other income from our top 18 donors, who collectively donated $869,127. Peter Lewis donated $225,000; David Bronner, Adam Wiggins, and the Keeler Foundation each donated $100,000; the Mental Insight Foundation and the Riverstyx Foundation each donated $60,000; Robert Barnhart donated $51,850; the Libra Foundation donated $35,000; Matt Bowden donated $25,000; John Gilmore donated $20,000; Vanya Palmers donated $16,152; Bill Linton donated $12,500, as did an anonymous donor; Larry Hagman donated $11,100; Ian Brown donated $10,025; Gerald Gaines donated $10,000, as did Wendy Grace and Rene Ruiz/Sue Mosher. MAPS received an additional $176,487 from 38 other donors of amounts between $1000 and $10,000.

Donations less than $1000 came from about 2,000 additional donors and amounted to $117,576. These unrestricted donations of less than $1,000 are a crucial part of MAPS’ success. These donations help us to cover some of our operational expenses, are part of building the MAPS community, lead to word-of-mouth contacts with new donors, and are the way some major donors began to get to know MAPS by enabling them to evaluate our work from the perspective of a member.

MAPS also brought in $71,101 from sales of books, art, clothes and other items. Event income was $257,297.

 
  Expenses
 

MAPS’ expenses in FY 11-12 amounted to $1.95 million. Of that amount, $718,000 (37%) was for research; $595,000 (30%) was for education; $455,000 (23%) was for management and general operations, cost of products sold, employee benefits and office equipment; and $186,000 (10%) was for the cost of fundraising.

A more detailed description of MAPS’ expenses follows below. From this list, the breadth of MAPS’ activities can be seen more clearly, as can our strategic priorities.

 
  Assets
  For a complete discussion of MAPS 2011-2012 fiscal year see our Winter 2012 Annual Financial Report.

 
  Projections
  For a complete discussion of MAPS 2011-2012 fiscal year see our Winter 2012 Annual Financial Report.

 
  Comparative results
 

MAPS faces a major fundraising challenge in FY 12-13. In FY 11-12, we benefited from a one-time net gain of $350,000 from the sale of our remainder interest in a home in La Jolla, Calif. We also received a donation of $100,000 from the Keeler Foundation that will not be repeated this year. In addition, we received $75,000 from the bequest of Larry Thomas and will receive the final payment of about $25,000 this year ($50,000 less than last year). This means that we received income of half a million dollars in FY 11-12 that will not be repeated in FY 12-13. In addition, we’re expanding our research agenda in FY 12-13 by about half a million dollars. In order to balance income and expenses in FY 12-13, we will need to bring in about $1 million in new donations, while sustaining our other donations at the same level. This is a daunting challenge, especially after a U.S. presidential election year that consumed an estimated $6 billion in non-taxable donations for all local, state, and federal races.

Nevertheless, MAPS’ fundraising goals for FY12-13 are attainable. The need for research into the healing potential of psychedelics is profound, we are building a track record of success, and interest in our work is growing. As this year-end Financial Report is being written, we are looking forward soon to the publication in the Journal of Psychopharmacology of our scientific paper about the results of MAPS’ long-term follow-up study to our initial U.S. study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. In the initial study, we reported results at the follow-up two months after the last MDMA-assisted psychotherapy session. In our long-term follow-up, we’ve gathered data at a mean of 45 months (more than 3½ years) after the last MDMA-assisted psychotherapy session. We’ve found that, on average, the decline in PTSD symptoms was sustained over time, demonstrating that there are lasting benefits from our experimental treatment. We can now demonstrate that the therapeutic benefits are more than just a psychedelic afterglow, and instead represent profound and lasting changes.

The publication of our scientific paper will be covered by The New York Times, CNN, NPR, and other media. We’re anticipating this will increase interest in MAPS’ MDMA/PTSD research from PTSD researchers, military officials, the public, and both current and new donors.

In February 2013, the results of our successful Swiss MDMA/PTSD pilot study will be published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology. This study further demonstrates that MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can be safely and effectively administered to people suffering from chronic, treatment-resistant PTSD. The publication of these two papers should help with fundraising for the expansion of our Phase 2 MDMA/PTSD studies, with our Israeli, Canadian, and second U.S. study location in Boulder, Colo., all likely to enroll and treat their first patients in FY 12-13.

We’re also working in FY 12-13 to write a scientific paper about the results of our completed Swiss study of LSD-assisted psychotherapy for end-of-life anxiety, which demonstrated safety and trends toward efficacy. This paper, when published, will also raise MAPS’ profile and is likely to generate additional support for MAPS’ research agenda.

Additional attention will be drawn to MAPS’ research as a result of our Psychedelic Science 2013 conference, cosponsored by MAPS, the Beckley Foundation, the Council on Spiritual Practices, and the Heffter Research Institute. This will be the largest number of psychedelic researchers at the same conference ever to occur in the U.S. CNN has already contacted us about attending, so it will be well-reported. We invite you to join us for this historic event, with large-scale conferences like this switching back to Europe, perhaps in 2015 and 2017.

MAPS’ mission has always been ambitious. Our fundraising challenges for FY 12-13 are the most challenging in the entire 26-year history of MAPS. As you contemplate your charitable donations, we offer this detailed report on our income and expenses from FY 11-12 for your review. Please consider making a generous donation to MAPS and mentioning MAPS in your wills. What was once forbidden, even for research, is now being studied and will, with your help, become an accepted and mainstream option for healing, inspiration, and spirituality.

 


contractFY 2011 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 2010-2011 June 1, 2010 - May 31, 2011  
 
  Introduction
 

The basic balance sheet information for FY 2010-2011 is presented below. For a complete discussion of MAPS 2010-2011 fiscal year see Rick Doblin’s financial report in the MAPS Bulletin, Volume 21 Number 3. You can also read MAPS’ complete IRS Form 990 for 2011 in PDF format.

Introduction

In addition to our obligation to be strategic and efficient with the funds we receive, I feel an additional obligation to be transparent about our allocation of resources and our priorities. Our goal with this financial report is to enable MAPS members and members of the public to see our priorities in action through our financial reporting. MAPS’ year-end financial reports are intended to communicate in specific detail where we allocate the funds we receive from our generous donors. Should you have any questions about any items in this report, you are invited to inquire at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

For the first time in our 25-year history, we have chosen to pay independent auditors to evaluate our accounting so that we can report to potential funders, especially major foundations and government agencies, that we do indeed have audited financials. This initial audit of our records from Fiscal Year 2010-11 cost MAPS $15,000. Since none of our donors have yet requested audited financials, this cost is what has previously deterred us from requesting the independent review.

As MAPS grows, we anticipate that audited financials will eventually be required of MAPS, and now is the time to prepare to meet these stricter financial reporting requirements. We are now looking forward to Phase 3 MDMA/PTSD studies and the dramatically increased expenses and income needed to make MDMA-assisted psychotherapy legally available. We’re proud to make our Auditor’s Management Letter, Audit Report, and Report on Internal Controls and Compliance publicly available on our website. Josh Mojeiko, MAPS Director of Finance and Information Technology, has done a terrific job preparing our books for the audit and responding to the auditors’ many requests for documentation.

What follows is a comprehensive report and discussion of MAPS’ income and expenses for Fiscal Year 2010-11 (June 1, 2010 to May 31, 2011).

 
  Income
 

Even though the global economy continues to struggle, MAPS was able to report remarkably successful results in FY 10-11. Income was $1.47 million and expenses were $1.38 million. This results in a net gain in assets of $89,000, for a total of $1.09 million, a small step towards the roughly $8-10 million that will be needed for our Phase 3 MDMA/PTSD studies. MAPS FY 10-11 results compare to an income of $1.57 million in the previous FY 09-10, with expenses of $1.42 million. Income for FY 09-10 was higher than this year due to our major Psychedelic Science conference, which resulted in gross event income of over $300,000.

There are several key reasons for our fundraising success in FY 10-11: (a) In July 2010, we published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology the outstanding results of our initial U.S. pilot study of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder, in which over 80% of the subjects with chronic, treatment-resistant PTSD lasting an average of over 20 years were cured of their PTSD by MDMA-assisted psychotherapy; (b) We initiated a new MDMA/PTSD study in U.S. veterans with chronic, treatment-resistant PTSD, a patient population for which there is profound public sympathy and for whom a broader group of donors is willing to support treatments; (c) We completed our Swiss MDMA/PTSD pilot study with results demonstrating safety and greater reductions in PTSD symptoms than in the studies resulting in the approval of Zoloft and Paxil for prescription use for PTSD; (d) We’ve continued to generate remarkably positive media, such as the March 2011 article about MAPS’ MDMA/PTSD research in O: The Oprah Magazine; and (e) the unique experience and expanding skill of MAPS’ dedicated staff.

Of MAPS’ income for FY 10-11, $1.17 million (80%) comes from a small number of major donors who give greater than or equal to $1000 per year, $138,000 (9%) from about 2000 donors who give less than $1000 per year, $94,000 (6%) from conference and events, $65,000 (4%) from product sales, and $3,000 (about .02%) from investments (interest on savings accounts and CDs).

MAPS’ single largest donation in FY 10-11 was $350,000 from a bequest by Larry Thomas, with about another $100,000 still to be disbursed in FY 11-12. Larry discussed his motivation to donate to MAPS in an interview with MAPS’ former Director of Communication and Marketing Randy Hencken. This interview was conducted several years before Larry died and was published in the MAPS Bulletin (Volume 20, Number 3). Larry’s donation is a gentle reminder that we should all consider leaving some funds to charity in our wills.

MAPS’ second largest donation in FY 10-11 was $200,000 from Ashawna Hailey, who served on MAPS’ Board of Directors. It’s with a heavy heart that I report that Ashawna recently died at age 62. We have heard that he has remembered MAPS generously in his will.

MAPS’ next largest donation was $175,000 from Peter Lewis. Joby Pritzker and his family’s Libra Foundation donated $125,000. MAPS Board Member Robert Barnhart donated $65,000. The Swift family’s Riverstyx Foundation donated $30,000. The Mental Insight Foundation and Matt Bowden/Stargate International each donated $25,000. Donations of $20,000 each were made by John Gilmore (also on MAPS’ Board of Directors), the Arsenault Family Foundation and Ian Brown (who received funds in a bequest to him which he then donated to MAPS). Rene Ruiz/Sue Mosher donated $10,000, as did MAPS-published author Marilyn Howell.

Donations less than $1000 play a major role in MAPS’ success. These unrestricted donations are important because they (a) contribute to covering operational expenses, (b) are from members who often donate their time for MAPS’ wide range of volunteer opportunities, (c) build the MAPS community, (d) lead to word-of-mouth contacts with new potential large donors, and (e) are what major donors often start giving to help them evaluate MAPS from the perspective of a member.

 
  Expenses
 

MAPS’ expenses in FY 10-11 amounted to $1.38 million. Of that amount, $555,000 (40%) was for research, $278,000 (20%) was for education, $123,000 (9%) was for project-related staff/office expenses, $71,231 (5%) was for the cost of fundraising events, and the remaining 26% was for management and general operations, cost of products sold, employee benefits, and office equipment.

A more detailed list and description of MAPS’ expenses is below. From this list, the breadth of MAPS’ activities can be seen more clearly, as can our strategic priorities.

 
  Assets
  For a complete discussion of MAPS 2010-2011 fiscal year see our Winter 2011 Annual Financial Report.

 
  Projections
  For a complete discussion of MAPS 2010-2011 fiscal year see our Winter 2011 Annual Financial Report.

 
  Comparative results
 

Concluding Comments

As this year-end financial report is being written, MAPS’ clinical research team, led by Michael Mithoefer, M.D., and Annie Mithoefer, B.S.N., is writing a scientific paper about the results of our long-term follow-up study to our initial US MDMA/PTSD study. We’ve gathered follow-up data at a mean of 41 months (almost 3½ years) after the last MDMA-assisted psychotherapy session. We’ve found that, on average, the decline in PTSD symptoms has sustained over time, demonstrating that there our experimental treatment has lasting benefits. Once this paper is published in a peer-reviewed journal, we anticipate that there will be an increased interest in MAPS’ MDMA/PTSD research by mainstream PTSD researchers, by the media, and by the public. This should help with fundraising for the expansion of our Phase 2 studies. We’ll also be working on papers about the results from our completed Swiss MDMA/PTSD pilot study and our Swiss LSD/end-of-life anxiety study, both of which demonstrated safety and trends toward efficacy and will generate additional support for our research plan.

While our U.S. MDMA/PTSD study in veterans will not be completed in FY 11-12, it will be about half completed. Media reports about this study will also generate increased interest in MAPS’ research, supporting our increasingly ambitious fundraising efforts. We assume that support from the Veterans Administration for MDMA/PTSD research in veterans will not be likely until after this study is completed. This will be even more likely if we generate results in this patient population that are as compelling as those from our initial U.S. MDMA/PTSD study, which was almost entirely in survivors of rape, assault, and childhood sexual abuse.

Unfortunately, the Public Health Service rejected MAPS’ marijuana/PTSD protocol after the FDA had approved it. The PHS reviewers evaluated the protocol from a basic science perspective rather than from a drug development perspective. As a result, the National Institute on Drug Abuse will not sell us any of its marijuana. The study is temporarily halted, since NIDA has a monopoly on the supply of marijuana legal for use in federally regulated clinical research. We have received favorable media coverage for our planned marijuana/PTSD study in The New York Times, while the PHS rejection was covered critically in both an article and an op-ed in the Washington Post. We’ll reapply, of course, but getting approval for this study has become a long-term struggle, and our success will depend in part on our ability to mobilize veterans to pressure NIDA to let it take place.

Our 10-year legal struggle with the DEA is moving to the First Circuit Court of Appeals. We are still seeking to end the NIDA monopoly by obtaining a DEA license for Professor Lyle Craker of the University of Massachusetts-Amherst to produce marijuana under contract to MAPS for federally regulated research. We’re going to be tied up in the appeals process for another several years, and have fortunately obtained pro-bono legal representation from the major Washington, DC, law firm Covington & Burling.

As you can see from our projected income and expenses for FY 11-12, we’re anticipating further growth in FY 11-12. This growth is largely dependent on the willingness of current MAPS members to continue to expand their support, and on our ability to attract and retain new members. As you contemplate your own year-end charitable donations, please consider making a generous donation to MAPS and mentioning MAPS in your will.

During this 25th anniversary of MAPS, our past accomplishments justify all of us feeling proud for having worked together. Our future potential is dazzling.

 

 


contractFY 2010 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 2009-2010 June 1, 2009 - May 31, 2010  
 
  Introduction
 

The basic balance sheet information for FY 2009-2010 is presented below. For a complete discussion of MAPS 2009-2010 fiscal year see Rick Doblin’s financial report in MAPS Bulletin Volume 20 number 3. You can also read MAPS’ complete IRS Form 990 for 2010 in PDF format.

Introduction

In the midst of an economic recession of historic proportions, MAPS FY 09-10 was remarkably successful. Income substantially increased by about 30% as compared to FY 08 - 09, approaching our record year of FY 07-08. When subtracting income from FY 07-08 for groups for which MAPS was the fiscal sponsor, income in FY 09-10 was our best year ever. Income was more than $1.57 million, expenses were more than $1.42 million, and our assets (mostly for upcoming study expenses) totaled $1 million. Total income exceeded the high end of our projected income ($1.45 million), permitting us to exceed our projected expenses ($1.27 million).

There are four primary reasons for this success: 1) the promising results from our U.S. and Swiss MDMA/PTSD pilot studies (and resulting publication of our U.S. study), which justify expanding our research agenda; 2) our outstanding and historic Psychedelic Science in the 21st Century conference; 3) our growing presence in the media which leverages scientific research into public education; and 4) the increasingly skilled and experienced MAPS staff who work efficiently and strategically to conduct research and educate the public honestly about the results of our studies.

 
  Income
 

MAPS' total income for FY 2009-2010 was $ 1,587,209. As in previous years, we’ve divided MAPS’ income into two categories, donations of $1000 or more, and donations of less than $1000. Income from donors of $1000 or more totaled $895,907. There were 10 donors over $10,000 who collectively donated $791,163, including $200,000 from Ashawna Hailey, $200,000 from John Gilmore, $100,000 from Joby Pritzker, $100,000 from David Bronner, $65,000 from Robert Barnhart, $50,000 from Peter Lewis, $25,000 from the Riverstyx Foundation, $25,000 from the Libra Foundation, $15,000 from Rene and Susan Ruiz, and $11,163 from Kevin Herbert. Support from these 10 donors was essential to MAPS’ ability to work towards our mission.

Income from donors of less than $1000 totaled $150,000, from about 2,200 donors. These smaller donations are more important than they may seem when compared with the donations of $1000 or more. These smaller donations are from a larger number of people who form the primary part of the MAPS community. Our smaller donations create the base of support from which MAPS covers a substantial portion of our operating costs. Many of our larger donors started out as smaller donors and, over time, obtained a better understanding of MAPS' work sufficient to motivate them to become larger donors. It’s often through the word of mouth of smaller donors that larger donors hear about MAPS, our most effective form of advertising. Our smaller donors also help educate MAPS staff about all sorts of matters related to our mission that we would otherwise have missed. I’ve long felt that if everybody who supports MAPS just gives what they can, regardless of the amount, we’ll end up having all the funds we need, and we’ll also benefit from volunteer help through donated time and services.

In addition to direct donations, MAPS brought in event income of $302,256, from our Psychedelic Science conference and other related events. Net income from the conference exceeded our expectations and amounted to $70,206, enabling us to spend about half of that on the post-conference seminar for researchers and on videotaping the conference and placing the videos on our website for free viewing. (The rest is being spent on other educational projects such as this Bulletin.) Income from books, Bulletins, art, and auction sales was $94,972 (including sales from the conference).

 
  Expenses
 

Expenses for FY 09-10 amounted to $1,423,347, divided between research, education, operational expenses and capital investments. While MAPS’ goal is to advance our mission, rather than to make a profit, we spent, with this amount primarily funding our MDMA/PTSD research projects that had not yet been fully approved by the end of FY 09-10, such as our U.S. study with veterans and our Canadian, Jordanian, and new Israeli studies.

A chart of all of MAPS expenses for FY 2009-2010 is available in PDF format. The division of expenses in terms of program services, management and general, and fundraising costs is the form required for the IRS Form 990.

The expenses in the chart are divided differently, and are categorized as project expenses (subdivided into research and educational projects), operational expenses (some of which are considered program services in the IRS report such as our website and Bulletin expenses, which are educational, and a substantial portion of staff salaries for work on research projects), product sales, and capital expenses. A summary of MAPS income, expenses, and assets is available in PDF format as well. You can also see a breakdown of MAPS staff salaries.

 
  Assets
 

Total assets at the end of FY 2009-2010 were $ 1,063,857. Of these assets, restricted funds amounted to $ 211,822, unrestricted funds amounted to $ 602,035, and MAPS operational reserve amounted to $250,000. Of the unrestricted funds, $50,000 is not liquid and is from the value of a remainder interest that MAPS was given in a $1 million home that will probably come to MAPS in 30 or 40 years. Of the restricted funds, $ 79,319 is for LSD research; $ 32,912 for psilocybin research; $ 21,973 for the Project Start-Up Fund: UMass Amherst (John Gilmore donated $ 100,000 to enable MAPS to fund initial costs of projects in early stages before other donors are likely to feel the projects are solid enough to justify support, ideally with the fund replenished if projects start); $ 50,273 is for the Jordanian MDMA/PTSD Psychotherapy Study, $ 10,364 for the Marijuana Vaporizer Study (which we have been unable to conduct since NIDA refuses to sell 10 grams for this study), $ 14,916 for Ibogaine Research (Mexico), $1000 for a Creativity Study, and $1000 for a Ketamine Study.

The restricted funds are summarized on this balance sheet available in PDF format. Besides in the Bulletin a listing of all MAPS Projects is also available in both PDF and HTML formats.

 
  Projections
 

This year we also provided 3 charts projecting MAPS current fiscal year into the future. These cover our projected expenses, projected project costs, and our projected fiscal position at the end of FY 2010-11.

 
  Comparative results
 

A chart presenting comparative results for the financial years 2002 - 2010 is available in PDF format.

Concluding Comments

The promising outcomes and resulting publication from MAPS’ U.S. MDMA/PTSD study, our long-term follow-up to our U.S. MDMA/PTSD study, and our Swiss MDMA/PTSD study provide powerful and compelling justification for expanding our international series of MDMA/PTSD studies. Our Swiss LSD/end-of-life study is still in process, as is our ibogaine outcome study, and both of these studies are likely to generate data that will suggest further research is in order. Unfortunately, our efforts to conduct research with medical marijuana are still fundamentally obstructed by the federal monopoly on the supply of marijuana available for FDA-regulated research projects.

When evaluated comprehensively and realistically, MAPS needs to continue to grow in order to fulfill our mission of developing psychedelics and marijuana into FDA-approved prescription medicines. Our growth will require finding new donors and retaining current ones. The pace of my travel has accelerated in conjunction with the expansion of our opportunities, and I’ll travel almost anywhere to meet potential large donors. Should anyone reading this financial report be able and willing to introduce me to potential large donors, please contact me at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) and we will make arrangements. MAPS has also benefited greatly from bequests, such as from Larry Thomas, whose bequest of about $400,000 will be received by MAPS in FY 10-11. For an insight into what motivated Larry to leave such a large bequest to MAPS, you can read an interview with him on page 32 of this Bulletin. Should anyone want to make a bequest to MAPS, please let us know so we can discuss whether you would prefer for your bequest to be restricted to any specific area or to be unrestricted. Of course, we’ll also encourage you to make smaller donations to MAPS while you can still see and be proud of the outcomes of your donations and we can thank you directly. For more information about making a bequest, please visit our website at: http://www.maps.org/bequests.

A major positive shift in the way Western culture sees psychedelic and medical marijuana research is in process. Part of this shift is due to the magnitude of the need for new treatments for PTSD and for new ways to help people navigate the profound challenge of facing death. Part of this shift is also due to the rather astonishing amount of favorable media coverage focusing on ongoing scientific studies with psychedelics and the increase in research showing beneficial results with patients from marijuana extracts and occasionally from marijuana itself, smoked or vaporized.

One example of this shift in the media is a thoughtful and favorable article about MDMA/PTSD research that will be published in O Magazine (Oprah Winfrey’s magazine) in early 2011, an outlet that is about as mainstream as there is. What makes this article such a good example of the shift in the media is that a decade ago, in 2001, Oprah devoted an entire television show to the risks of Ecstasy, featuring a brain scan that had first been shown on MTV that was digitally manipulated to display a series of major holes in the brain supposedly from MDMA, an image that was fraudulent yet powerful.

At the time, Oprah asked a young woman in the audience who had used Ecstasy at parties whether she would stop using if her brain had holes in it like the image broadcast during the show. When the young woman agreed that holes in her brain would persuade her not to use Ecstasy, Oprah offered her a brain scan and said the results would be broadcast on another show. This young woman contacted MAPS the day after the show and I encouraged her to accept the offer of a brain scan, but not from the people who created the holes in the brain image. The young woman went ahead with the scan and–as we knew would be the case–there were no holes. Unfortunately, there was also no second show on Oprah. Since this is now Oprah’s last year for her TV show, we’re trying to see if she would be willing to follow the article in O Magazine with the long-promised second show.

With your continued support of MAPS, we’ll continue to work toward developing psychedelics and marijuana into FDA-approved prescription medicines, for the benefit of many individuals and our entire society.


contractFY 2009 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 2008-2009 June 1, 2008 - May 31, 2009  
 
  Introduction
  The basic balance sheet information for FY 2008-2009 is presented below. For a complete discussion of MAPS 2008-2009 fiscal year see Rick Doblin's financial report in MAPS Bulletin Volume 19 number 3. You can also read MAPS' complete IRS Form 990 for 2009 in PDF format.
 
  Income
  MAPS' total income for FY 2008-2009 was $ 1,206,490.
 
  Expenses
  Total expenses were $ 1,393,848 which resulted in a decrease of assets in the amount of $ 187,358. Of these expenses, program services totaled $ 1,180,551 and management and general/fundraising costs were $ 213,297. A chart of all of MAPS expenses for FY 2008-2009 is available in PDF format. The division of expenses in terms of program services, management and general, and fundraising costs is the form required for the IRS Form 990. The expenses in the chart are divided differently, and are categorized as project expenses (subdivided into research and educational projects), operational expenses (some of which are considered program services in the IRS report such as our website and Bulletin expenses, which are educational, and a substantial portion of staff salaries for work on research projects), product sales, and capital expenses. A summary of MAPS income, expenses, and assets is available in PDF format as well. You can also see a breakdown of MAPS staff salaries.
 
  Assets
  Total assets at the end of FY 2008-2009 were $ 853,653. Of these assets, restricted funds amounted to $ 245,948 and unrestricted funds amounted to $ 636,029. Of the unrestricted funds, $50,000 is not liquid and is from the value of a remainder interest that MAPS was given in a $1 million home that will probably come to MAPS in 30 or 40 years. Of the restricted funds, $ 110,800 is for LSD/psilocybin research; $ 21,973 for the Project Start-Up Fund: UMass Amherst (John Gilmore donated $ to enable MAPS to fund initial costs of projects in early stages before other donors are likely to feel the projects are solid enough to justify support, ideally with the fund replenished if projects start); $ 81,530 is for the Jordanian MDMA/PTSD Psychotherapy Study, $ 10,364 for the Marijuana Vaporizer Study (which we have been unable to conduct since NIDA refuses to sell 10 grams for this study), $4,655 for Ibogaine Research (Mexico), $8901 in Staff Retirement funds, $1000 for a Creativity Study, $1000 for a Ketamine Study, $ 1,881 for the Erowid.org Website, and $ 3,256 for Summer Festivals. The restricted funds are summarized on this balance sheet available in PDF format. A listing of all MAPS Projects is also available in both PDF and HTML formats.
 
  Projections
  This year we also provided 3 charts projecting MAPS current fiscal year into the future. These cover our projected expenses, projected project costs, and our projected fiscal position at the end of FY 2009-10.
 
  Comparative results
  A chart presenting comparative results for the financial years 2001 - 2009 is available in PDF format.

contractFY 2008 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 2007-2008 June 1, 2007 - May 31, 2008  
 
  Introduction
  The basic balance sheet information for FY 2007-2008 is presented below. For a complete discussion of MAPS 2007-2008 fiscal year see Rick Doblin's financial report in MAPS Bulletin Volume 18 number 3. You can also read MAPS' complete IRS Form 990 for 2008 in PDF format.
 
  Income
  MAPS' total income for FY 2007-2008 was $1,698,454.
 
  Expenses
  Total expenses were $1,446,138 which resulted in a increase of assets in the amount of $252,316. Of these expenses, program services totaled $1,168,592 and management and general/fundraising costs were $277,546. A chart of all of MAPS expenses for FY 2007-2008 is available in PDF format. The division of expenses in terms of program services, management and general, and fundraising costs is the form required for the IRS Form 990. The expenses in the chart are divided differently, and are categorized as project expenses (subdivided into research and educational projects), operational expenses (some of which are considered program services in the IRS report such as our website and Bulletin expenses, which are educational, and a substantial portion of staff salaries for work on research projects), product sales, and capital expenses. A summary of MAPS income, expenses, and assets is available in PDF format as well.
 
  Assets
  Total assets at the end of FY 2007-2008 were $1,041,011. Of these assets, restricted funds amounted to $260,050 and unrestricted funds amounted to $780,961. Of the unrestricted funds, $50,000 is not liquid and is from the value of a remainder interest that MAPS was given in a $1 million home that will probably come to MAPS in 30 or 40 years. Of the restricted funds, $128,760 is for LSD/psilocybin research; $22,819 for the Project Start-Up Fund: UMass Amherst (John Gilmore donated $100,000 to enable MAPS to fund initial costs of projects in early stages before other donors are likely to feel the projects are solid enough to justify support, ideally with the fund replenished if projects start): $36,587 is for the overall MDMA Psychotherapy Research Effort, $33,460 for the LSD/LSA/Psilocybin Cluster Headache Studies, $10,364 for the Marijuana Vaporizer Study (which we have been unable to conduct since NIDA refuses to sell 10 grams for this study), $11,193 for the the 2008 Burning Man Temple Project: Basura Sagrada, $1,750 for Bia Labate's Ayahuasca Religions Book, $2,375 for MAPS "Working with Difficult Psychedelic Experiences" video, $1000 for a Creativity Study, $1000 for a Ketamine Study, $5,793 for the Erowid.org Website, and $4,950 in Dean Chamberlain Royalties. The restricted funds are summarized on this balance sheet available in PDF format. A listing of all MAPS Projects is also available in both PDF and HTML formats.
 
  Comparative results
  A chart presenting comparative results for the financial years 2001 - 2008 is available in PDF format.

contractFY 2007 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 2006-2007 June 1, 2006 - May 31, 2007  
 
  Introduction
  The basic balance sheet information for FY 2006-2007 is presented below.
MAPS IRS Form 990 for 2007 is available in PDF format.
 
  Income
  MAPS' total income for FY 2006-2007 was $1,285,493.
 
  Expenses
  Total expenses were $1,288,059 which resulted in a decrease of assets in the amount of $2566. Of these expenses, program services totaled $1,109,464 and management and general/fundraising costs were $170,254. A chart of all of MAPS expenses for FY 2006-2007 is available in PDF format. The division of expenses in terms of program services, management and general, and fundraising costs is the form required for the IRS Form 990. The expenses in the chart are divided differently, and are categorized as project expenses (subdivided into research and educational projects), operational expenses (some of which are considered program services in the IRS report such as our website and Bulletin expenses, which are educational, and a substantial portion of staff salaries for work on research projects), product sales, and capital expenses. A summary of MAPS income, expenses, and assets is available in PDF format as well.
 
  Assets
  Total assets at the end of FY 2006-2007 were $788,694. Of these assets, restricted funds amounted to $297,044 and unrestricted funds amounted to $491,650. Of the unrestricted funds, $40,000 is not liquid and is from the value of a remainder interest that MAPS was given in a $1 million home that will probably come to MAPS in 30 or 40 years. Of the restricted funds, $43,494 is for LSD/psilocybin research; $65,395 for the Project Start-Up Fund: UMass Amherst (John Gilmore donated $100,000 to enable MAPS to fund initial costs of projects in early stages before other donors are likely to feel the projects are solid enough to justify support, ideally with the fund replenished if projects start): $60,428 is for the overall MDMA Psychotherapy Research Effort, $74,783 for the LSD/LSA/Psilocybin Cluster Headache Studies, $11,864 for the Marijuana Vaporizer Study (which we have been unable to conduct since NIDA refuses to sell 10 grams for this study), $4341 for the Women's Entheogen Fund, $6,375 for the Women's Visionary Congress, $2500 for MAPS "Working with Difficult Psychedelic Experiences" video, and $1000 for a Creativity Study. The restricted funds are summarized on this balance sheet available in PDF format. A listing of all MAPS Projects is also available in both PDF and HTML formats.
 
  Comparative results
  A chart presenting comparative results for the financial years 2001 - 2007 is available in PDF format.

contractFY 2006 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 2005-2006 June 1, 2005 - May 31, 2006  
 
  Introduction
  The basic balance sheet information for FY 2004-2005 is presented below.
MAPS IRS Form 990 for 2006 is available in PDF format.
 
  Income
  MAPS' total income for FY 2005-2006 was $1,156.017.76
 
  Expenses
  Total expenses were $1,025,475.22 which resulted in an increase of assets in the amount of $130,542.54. Of these expenses, program services totaled $903,570.52 and management and general/fundraising costs were $121,904.70. A chart of all of MAPS expenses for FY 2005-2006 is be available in PDF format. The division of expenses in terms of program services, management and general, and fundraising costs is the form required for the IRS Form 990. The expenses in the chart are divided differently, and are categorized as project expenses (subdivided into research and educational projects), operational expenses (some of which are considered program services in the IRS report such as our website and Bulletin expenses, which are educational, and a substantial portion of staff salaries for work on research projects), product sales, and capital expenses.
 
  Assets
  Total assets at the end of FY 2005-2006 were $783,522. Of these assets, restricted funds amounted to $266,621 and unrestricted funds amounted to $516,901. Of the unrestricted funds, $40,000 is not liquid and is from the value of a remainder interest that MAPS was given in a $1 million home that will probably come to MAPS in 30 or 40 years. Of the restricted funds, $70,277 is for LSD/psilocybin research; $68,053 for the Project Start-Up Fund: UMass Amherst (John Gilmore donated $100,000 to enable MAPS to fund initial costs of projects in early stages before other donors are likely to feel the projects are solid enough to justify support, ideally with the fund replenished if projects start): $64,692 is for the overall MDMA Psychotherapy Research Effort, $44,498 for the Harvard LSD/Psilocybin Cluster Headache Study, $13,000 for the Marijuana Vaporizer Study (which we have been unable to conduct since NIDA refuses to sell 10 grams for this study), $5100 for the Women's Entheogen Fund, and $1000 for a Creativity Study.
 
  Comparative results
  A chart presenting comparative results for the financial years 2000 - 2006 is be available in PDF format.

contractFY 2005 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 2004-2005 May 31, 2004 - May 30, 2005  
 
  Introduction
  The basic balance sheet information for FY 2004-2005 is presented below.
MAPS IRS Form 990 for 2005 is available in PDF format.
 
  Income
  MAPS total income for FY 2004-2005 was $812,540.15.
 
  Expenses
  Total expenses were $903,883.36, which resulted in a decrease of assets in the amount of $91,343.21. Of these expenses, project expenses totaled $569,232.67 and operational costs were $326,453.89. A chart of all of MAPS expenses for FY 2004-2005 is available in PDF format.
 
  Assets
  Total assets at the end of FY 2004-2005 were $670,152.95. Of these assets, restricted funds amounted to $330,165.65 and unrestricted funds amounted to $339,987.30. Of the restricted funds $107,019.65 was for the overall MDMA Psychotherapy Research Effort, $13,000 for the Vaporizer Study, $46,640.00 for the Harvard LSD/Psilocybin/Cluster Headache Study, $87,590.00 for the Project Start-Up Fund: UMass Amherst, and $1000 for the Creativity Study.
 
  Comparative results
  A chart presenting comparative results for the financial years 2000 - 2005 is available in PDF format.

contractFY 2004 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 2003-2004 June 1, 2003 - May 31, 2004  
 
  Introduction
  The basic balance sheet information for FY 2003-2004 is presented below.
MAPS IRS Form 990 for 2004 is available in PDF format.
 
  Income
  MAPS total income for FY 2003-2004 was $1,035,873.
 
  Expenses
  Total expenses were $653,780, which resulted in an increase of assets in the amount of $382,093. Of these expenses, project expenses totaled $413,266 and operational costs were $229,222. A chart of all of MAPS expenses for FY 2003-2004 is available in PDF format.
 
  Assets
  Total assets at the end of FY 2002-2003 were $761,496. Of these assets, restricted funds amounted to $456,800 and unrestricted funds amounted to $304,700. Of the restricted funds $82,560 was for MDMA/PTSD research, $206,690 was for the overall MDMA Psychotherapy Research Effort, $1,500 for Ecstasy Pill Testing, $13,000 for the Vaporizer Study, $50,000 for the Harvard LSD/Psilocybin/Cluster Headache Study, $102,000 for the Project Start-Up Fund: UMass Amherst, and $1000 for the Creativity Study.
 
  Comparative results
  A chart presenting comparative results for the financial years 2000 - 2004 is available in PDF format.

contractFY 2003 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 2002-2003 June 1, 2002 - May 31, 2003  
 
  Introduction
  The basic balance sheet information for FY 2002-2003 is presented below. MAPS IRS Form 990 for 2003 is available in PDF format.
 
  Income
  MAPS total income for FY 2002-20003 was $596,538.
 
  Expenses
  Total expenses were $621,536, which resulted in a drawdown of assets in the amount of $24,997. Of these expenses, project expenses totaled $368,025 and operational costs were $253,510. A chart of all of MAPS expenses for FY 2002-2003 is available in PDF format.
 
  Assets
  Total assets at the end of FY 2002-2003 were $379,403.
 
  Comparative results
  A chart presenting comparative results for the financial years 2000 - 2003 is available in PDF format.

contractFY 2002 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 2001-2002 June 1, 2001 - May 31, 2002  
 
  Introduction
  The basic balance sheet information for FY 2001-2002 is presented below. MAPS IRS Form 990 for 2002 is available in PDF format.
 
  Income
  MAPS total income for FY 2001-2002 was $775,945.
 
  Expenses
  Total expenses were $719,589, resulting in an increase of assets by $56,356. Of these expenses, project expenses totaled $404,361 and operational costs were $315,227. A chart of all of MAPS expenses for FY 2001-2002 is available in PDF format.
 
  Assets
  Total assets at the end of FY 2001-2002 year were $404,401.
 
  Comparative results
  A chart presenting comparative results for the financial years 2000 - 2003 is available in PDF format

contractFY 2001 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 2000-2001 May 31, 2000 - May 30, 2001  
 
  Introduction
  The basic balance sheet information for FY 2000-2001 is presented below. MAPS IRS Form 990 for 2001is available in PDF format.
 
  Income
  MAPS total income for FY 2000-2001 was $937,581. During FY 2000-2001, MAPS acted as the fiscal sponsor for DanceSafe and received restricted income in the amount of $396,972. Once subtracted out, MAPS income for FY 2000-2001 declines to $540,609.
 
  Expenses
  Total expenses were $956,509, resulting in a drawdown of MAPS' assets of $18,927. Of these expenses, project expenses totaled $713,337 and operational expenses were $241,131. A chart of all of MAPS expenses for FY 2000-2001 is available in PDF format.
 
  Assets
  Total assets at the end of FY 2000-2001 were $349,134.
 
  Comparative results
  A chart presenting comparative results for the financial years 2000 - 2003 is available in PDF format.

contractFY 2000 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 1999-2000 June 1, 1999 - May 31, 2000  
 
  Introduction
 

Normally, MAPS publishes a detailed report of its annual income and expenditures in the calendar year's final issue of the Bulletin. Last December, in a departure from tradition, MAPS published a special issue of the Bulletin with the theme of Psychedelics and Creativity. We wanted to keep the special issue focused on that topic and decided to publish the annual financial report for FY 99-00 in the first issue of this year.

PDF version of this document    PDF version of IRS Form 990 for 2000

You can read this report in its original form here.

 
  Income
  MAPS income in FY 99-00 was $555,292.
 
  Expenses
  Total expenditures for FY 99-00 were $533,482. More than half of MAPS' $533,482 in total expenditures in FY 99-00, $309,045, were devoted to various facets of its' educational mission. A total of $75,200 was spent on research projects. Staff expenditures totaled $131,311, while office-related expenses amounted to $17,925. These expenditures will be discussed in detail below in the section explaining each line item in the expense spreadsheet that accompanies this report.
 
  Assets
  MAPS' net assets were $379,423 as of the close of FY 99-00 on May 31, 2000. As a non-profit organization, MAPS' goal is to advance its mission, not to amass net assets. However, a reasonable amount of net assets empowers MAPS to achieve its goals. Net assets give a measure of stability to meet organizational expenses in the face of fluctuating contributions from membership. More importantly, net assets give MAPS the ability to commit to fund high-priority projects still in the development stages, should the projects be approved. As a result, researchers who work with MAPS are willing to invest their time and energy in the lengthy and time-consuming protocol development and approval process confident that if approval is eventually obtained, their research project will indeed be funded.

Of MAPS' $379,423 in net assets at the close of FY 99-00, $40,000 is not available for use but represents the net present value of MAPS' remainder interest in a home that MAPS will receive in its entirety in forty to fifty years. Roughly $200,000 will be needed for the MDMA/PTSD research project MAPS is seeking to initiate in the United States, should it be approved (which I expect it will be). About $100,000 will be needed for the medical marijuana production facility MAPS is trying to establish should lightening strike and DEA permission is actually granted for this project.

As a matter of fiscal strategy, MAPS will seek to raise new funds for all projects in development that do become approved. If new funds can be obtained for approved projects, MAPS can retain some net assets along with the ability to guarantee funding to additional pioneering studies in the development phase, should they also become approved. Of course, MAPS can only pledge to fund projects whose cost is lower than MAPS' unallocated assets.

The major way I look at MAPS' net assets is in comparison with the estimated cost of achieving MAPS' primary goal, that being to obtain FDA approval for the medical use of MDMA as an adjunct to psychotherapy. Based on what I believe are reasonable financial assumptions, I've estimated that it will cost $5 million and take 5 years to conduct sufficient research to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the FDA the safety and efficacy of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in the treatment of patients suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). (see the Clinical Plan at: /research/mdmaplan.html.) From this perspective, MAPS' current net assets are sufficient only for the first steps of this clinical plan. However, I've always believed, and so far have had that belief confirmed, that funding can and will be obtained for all the successive steps in the research process, once the protocols are fully approved and ready to be implemented.

 
  Comparative results
  MAPS had a successful and active year in FY 99-00, with a mix of educational and research projects. In terms of clinical research, much of what took place in FY 99-00 was laying the groundwork for research projects still to be approved.

Now that I have completed my dissertation, I feel a bit more wind in my sails. Simultaneously, the social breezes are shifting directions somewhat. With skill and patience, it's possible to create increasingly greater opportunities to advance MAPS' agenda. As the teamwork between MAPS' staff and our membership continues to develop and expand, MAPS becomes more effective. I'm reminded yet again of Theodore Hertzl's inspiring words, "If you will it, it is no dream."


contractFY 1999 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 1998-1999 June 1, 1998 - May 31, 1999  
 
  Introduction
  MAPS IRS Form 990 for 1999 in PDF format

Fiscal Year June 1, 1998 - May 31, 1999 (FY 98-99) was another year of significant accomplishments. More than twice as much money was devoted to educational projects than to research projects, due in part to continued struggles to obtain permission for research. Staff time was more evenly divided between educational and research efforts, primarily because working to resolve and overcome bureaucratic obstacles to research requires more time and effort than money.

MAPS' efforts on behalf of research bore fruit this summer - after the close of MAPS' FY 98-99 - with three FDA decisions which we reported in the last Bulletin (Vol. IX No. 3). First, the FDA approved MAPS' application to have marijuana designated an Orphan Drug for AIDS wasting. Second, the FDA approved Dr. Ethan Russo's MAPS-supported marijuana/migraine protocol. Finally, the FDA decided to permit Dr. Charles Grob to move forward with a MAPS- supported study of MDMA in cancer patients, with the exact protocol design still to be negotiated.

You can read this report in its original form here.

 
  Income
  Income for FY 98-99 was $308,743.
 
  Expenses
  MAPS' total expenditures in FY 98-99 were $280,194.
 
  Assets
 

MAPS' net assets were $351,701 as of May 31, 1999. Of this amount, $80,000 is restricted to specific research and educational projects. These sums need to be subtracted from net assets when considering MAPS' unrestricted funds available for new projects or organizational expenses. MAPS' goal as a non-profit organization is not to increase its net assets, but to advance its mission. Nevetheless, having some net assets gives MAPS the ability to commit to support high- priority projects and gives a measure of stability in the face of fluctuating contributions from its membership.

 
  Comparative results
 

Scientifically, FY 98-99 was a year in which several groundbreaking studies were conducted, most notably Dr. Krupitsky's study of the use of ketamine-assisted psychotherapy in the treatment of heroin addicts, and the UC San Francisco study of Dr. Donald Abrams, in which the effects of marijuana in HIV patients is being evaluated. A fascinating study of Salvia divinorum and meditation was started, and a medical marijuana potency study was completed, both at little financial cost. A follow-up study to the LSD research of Dr. Janiger was completed and a follow-up study to the LSD research of Dr. Bastiaans was initiated.

A great deal of energy was spent trying to obtain permission for MDMA research projects around the world, for Dr. Russo's marijuana/migraine study in the United States, and for MAPS' application to have marijuana declared on Orphan Drug for AIDS wasting syndrome. The results of this effort can be seen in the FDA's final approval of Dr. Russo's study, which took place in FY 99-2000, and FDA approval of MAPS' application to have marijuana declared an Orphan Drug for AIDS wasting syndrome, which also took place in FY 99-2000.

MAPS' work on behalf of MDMA research can be measured by whether approvals will be granted in FY 99-2000 for MDMA psychotherapy projects in the United States, Israel and Spain.

Educationally, MAPS reached out to more people than ever through its Bulletin, various web site projects, email discussion group, book publication efforts, and membership drive. MAPS supported the Psychedelic Elders conference and began planning a major international scientific conference on the clinical use of MDMA.

Financially, MAPS raised a substantial amount of money that enabled it to support a wide range of projects. MAPS' net assets were $351,701 as of May 31, 1999. Of these assets, $80,000 are restricted to specific research and educational projects and need to be subtracted from net assets when considering MAPS' unrestricted funds available for new projects or organizational expenses. These restricted sums will probably all be allocated in FY 99-2000.

MAPS' work load and range of projects increased, and with it the need to increase the amount of unrestricted donations that MAPS can use for organizational expenses. The disappointing results of the direct mail membership campaign means that MAPS needs to rely on its current members to remain supportive and to assist MAPS staff in outreach efforts to locate new people who share MAPS' vision and goals and are willing to become formally involved as new MAPS members. Current MAPS members are an unusual group of people willing to support efforts to make this vision of the beneficial uses of psychedelics and marijuana into a reality. After MAPS succeeds in obtaining FDA permission for psychedelic psychotherapy research in the United States, research which has not taken place for over 25 years, it may prove easier to motivate people to support MAPS and the projects for which it has managed to obtain approval.

This past year has been one of significant accomplishments, among the most important being the building of a more mutually satisfactory working relationship with the FDA. I hope and expect that FY 99-2000 will see a continued improvement in MAPS' relationship with regulatory bodies around the world.

Comments or questions from MAPS members concerning this annual report are invited. Only with the continued support of its members can MAPS build in FY 99-2000 on the efforts expended since MAPS was founded in 1986. MAPS is deeply grateful for the past generosity of MAPS' membership. We will do our best to be worthy of your renewed support.


contractFY 1998 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 1997-1998 June 1, 1997 - May 31, 1998  
 
  Introduction
  You can read this report in its original form here.

MAPS IRS Form 990 for 1998 in PDF format

Fiscal Year June 1, 1997 -- May 31, 1998 (FY 97-98) was a strong year for MAPS with a combination of important accomplishments and, not unexpectedly, some difficult struggles and set-backs. Financially, MAPS' budget grew 15% from FY 96-97, permitting it to support a wide variety of projects. Income was substantial but was less than half of what it was in FY 96-97, when MAPS received an extraordinary one-time donation of $329,000 from the estate of Eric Bass. After subtracting the value of Eric Bass' donation from FY 96- 97 income, income from FY 97-98 was almost exactly the same as in FY 96-97. Eric Bass' generosity has greatly expanded the capabilities of MAPS as an organization and will enable MAPS to be a catalyst of psychedelic and marijuana research for years to come. MAPS membership has also continued to grow gradually. The increased workload from projects and membership required the addition of a third full-time staff member, Carla Higdon, who had previously been working part-time. MAPS is quite fortunate to have someone of Carla's skills and dedication join the organization.

 
  Income
  MAPS' income in FY 97-98 was $227,637.
 
  Expenses
  MAPS' expenditures in FY 97-98 amounted to $288,548.
 
  Assets
  At the close of FY 97-98, MAPS had assets of $333,440. In addition, MAPS owned computer and office equipment worth $5,000. In FY 96-97, MAPS had assets of $370,494 plus computer equipment valued at $5,000. This compares to assets at the end of FY 95-96 of $67,367 plus computer equipment worth $2,000, and assets of $29,981 at the end of FY 94-95 plus computer equipment worth $1,500.
 
  Comparative results
 

FY 97-98 was a year of gradual growth in membership and the start of exciting new projects, particularly the initiation of Dr. Abrams' study of the effects of marijuana in AIDS patients, and the opening of an effort to conduct MDMA research in Israel. Dr. Krupitsky's ketamine/heroin addiction study also continued to move forward and generate promising results. It was also a frustrating year since the MDMA/cancer patient study was still not approved by the FDA and MAPS' other medical marijuana project, by Dr. Ethan Russo, was rejected for the second time by the National Institutes of Health. MAPS' workload increased as did its staff. Educational efforts received more attention than ever before, and MAPS published its first book, The Secret Chief. Valuable lessons were learned from the failure of the direct mail membership campaign and another effort to increase membership is in process. All told, its was a satisfying year that has laid the groundwork for what we hope will be a new year of dramatic progress.


contractFY 1997 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 1996-1997 June 1, 1996 - May 31, 1997  
 
  Introduction
 

You can read this report in its original form here.

 
  Income
  MAPS' income in FY 96-97 was $558,683.
 
  Expenses
  MAPS' expenditures in FY 96-97 amounted to $255,746.
 
  Assets
  At the close of FY 96-97, MAPS had assets of $347,494, plus remainder interest worth about $23,000 in a home in La Jolla, California that will become solely owned by MAPS in approximately 40 years. In addition, MAPS owns computer and office equipment worth about $5,000. This compares to assets at the end of FY 95-96 of $44,367 plus the remainder interest in the La Jolla home and computer equipment worth about $2,000, and assets of $29,981 at the end of FY 94-95 plus computer equipment worth about $1,500.
 
  Comparative results
  FY 96-97 represented a dramatic increase in income, expenditures and number of projects over FY 95- 96. FY 96-97 also saw the addition of a third part-time staff member, Carla Higdon, who is now working full-time.

Comments or questions from MAPS members concerning this annual report are invited. Only with the continued support of its members can MAPS continue to build in FY 97-98 on its successes of FY 96-97.


contractFY 1996 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 1995-1996 June 1, 1995 - May 31, 1996  
 
  Introduction
 

This past fiscal year, which ran from June 1, 1995 to May 31, 1996, was MAPS' tenth and most successful ever in terms of both fund-raising and membership. I believe that at least part of this increasing success can be attributed to MAPS' accountability, as evidenced by the detailed disclosure of our income and expenditures in an explanatory article printed annually in the MAPS newsletter. With this information, MAPS members can determine how their money is being spent and can judge for themselves whether the pattern of expenditures satisfies their criteria for the productive use of their charitable donations.

Another reason for the growth in donations to MAPS is our willingness to devote 100% of a donation to a specific purpose if the donor so desires, without subtracting any percentage for operating expenses. For MAPS to be able to offer this option, a sufficient number of MAPS members must be willing to make unrestricted donations that can be used for operating expenses. The policy of encouraging restricted gifts is thus dependent upon the determination of hundreds of individual members that the overall spending priorities of MAPS are consistent with their vision for this organization.

You can read this report in its original form here.

 
  Income
  MAPS' total cash income in FY 95-96 was $190,330.
 
  Expenses
  Total expenditures in FY 95-96 climbed to $185,797.
 
  Assets
  Income to MAPS for FY 95-96 amounted to $190,330 (not including $10,000 of Sun Microsystems stock) while expenses were $185,797. MAPS held a bank balance of $34,367 at the close of FY 95-96. Of this balance, $20,741.62 was in unrestricted funds and $13,625.47 in restricted funds, $12,126.47 restricted to MDMA research and $1,499 restricted to LSD research.

 
  Comparative results
 

FY 95-96 was the best ever for MAPS in financial terms. In terms of MAPS' goals, however, the year was decidedly mixed. The most important accomplishment was the conclusion of Dr. Grob's Phase 1 MDMA safety study, which successfully laid the groundwork for future studies into the therapeutic potential of MDMA. This accomplishment alone made the entire year a great success.

A very disappointing setback was the continued suppression of Dr. Abrams' FDA-approved study into the use of marijuana in the treatment of the AIDS wasting syndrome. MAPS has now been trying for over four years without success to sponsor research into the medical use of marijuana. It seems that progress in the medical marijuana issue is dependent not on science but rather on politics. MAPS will particularly be watching the fate at the ballot box of California Proposition 215, which would legalize the right of patients or their primary caregivers to grow marijuana for medical purposes with the recommendation of a physician.

Also disappointing was NIDA's shortsighted decision not to fund Phase 1 human studies with ibogaine, even though the data from several million dollars worth of NIDA-funded animal studies suggested to many independent scientists that ibogaine might indeed have anti-addiction potential at acceptable levels of risk.

Despite the disappointments, and actually because of them, the need for an organization like MAPS is clear. MAPS will thrive to the extent that it can continue to weave together the support of a large number of small donors, a small number of large donors, the efforts of several committed physicians and researchers who invest their time in psychedelic and marijuana research, and the courageous actions of some government regulators who are willing to place science and human needs over the excesses of the War on Drugs.


contractFY 1995 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 1994-1995 June 1, 1994 - May 31, 1995  
 
  Introduction
 

You can read this report in its original form here.

 
  Income
 

Total Income for FY 94-95 was $107,184.

 
  Expenses
 

Total Expenses for FY 94-95 were $133,153.

 
  Assets
 

See original report.

 
  Comparative results
 

See original report.


contractFY 1994 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 1993-1994 June 1, 1993 - May 31, 1994  
 
  Introduction
 

You can read this report in its original form here.

 
  Income
  Total Income for FY 93-94 was $106,650.48.
 
  Expenses
  Total FY 93-94 Expenses were $83,052.25.
 
  Assets
 

The amount of money in MAPS’ bank account at the end of the year rose to the rather astonishing sum of $55,946.58.  Of this sum, $48,820 was restricted for specific research projects.  By the time you read this report, several months after the close of MAPS’ fiscal year, $1,568 of the restricted funds will have been spent on the Nicaraguan project, and $8,000 will have been spent on the water pipe/vaporization study.  At the time of this writing, $39,252 remains earmarked for specific research projects

MAPS had a balance of $7,126.58 in unrestricted operating funds at the end of the fiscal year.  Most of this sum has now been spent on this newsletter and to pay for operating expenses.

 
  Comparative results
 

There you have it, MAPS’ financial report for FY 93-94.  MAPS continues to
grow as does its research agenda, responsibilities, and membership.  With
your continued support, and that of new members who share an interest in
MAPS’ priorities, the report from FY 94-95 will demonstrate even more
accomplishments.  This year’s priorities are to spend our current
carryover funds, get MAPS’ operating budget on a more secure footing, and
raise $160,000 for Dr. Grob’s study of the use of MDMA to reduce pain and
distress in terminal cancer patients.  With your help, it can be done!


contractFY 1993 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 1992-1993 June 1, 1992 - May 31, 1993  
 
  Introduction
 

At the beginning of this fiscal year, MAPS had about 350 members and $897 in the bank. By the end of the fiscal year, MAPS' membership had doubled to 707 and its balance was $46,066 (consisting of $32,066 in cash and $14,000 in receivables related to MAPS' co-sponsorship of the 50th anniversary of LSD conferences-see pages 34-37 and 52-56). Of MAPS' assets, $37,000 is restricted to specific research projects and $9,066 is available for other research projects and general operating expenses. (The expenses associated with this newsletter will reduce MAPS' non-restricted funds to about $6,000.) MAPS' total income grew in FY 1992 from $28,860 (see MAPS Newsletter, Vol III, #3) to $113,962. Growth stemmed from increased membership donations, gross receipts of about $24,000 from admission fees to the 50th Anniversary conferences and, for the first time in MAPS' seven-year history, foundation grants. MAPS would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge with appreciation grants of $30,000 from the Dartington Hall Trust's Nicholas Carr-Saunders Fund (restricted to MDMA research in Russia) and $2,000 from the Tides Foundation's Breath and Smile Fund for general operating expenses.

MAPS' ability to cover its organizational expenses from membership donations permits it to offer donors the opportunity to direct 100% of their donations to research projects of their choice. This strategy seems to me to be the key to MAPS' fundraising success.

You can read this report in its original form here.

 
  Income
  MAPS' total income grew in FY 92-93 to $113,962.
 
  Expenses
  MAPS' total expenditures in FY 92-93 were $68,019.18.
 
  Assets
  Assets at the end of FY 92-93 were $46,066.
 
  Comparative results
  MAPS has been pledged $50,000 to support a study comparing smoked marijuana and the oral THC pill in the treatment of the HIV-related wasting syndrome (see page 6). MAPS has also been pledged $15,000 for a study of the effectiveness of water pipes in filtering marijuana smoke (see page 4-5). Since both projects require additional funding, I will ask the donors to make their actual contributions only after I have obtained pledges completely sufficient to fund the studies.


contractFY 1992 Financial Report
  MAPS Annual Financial Report  
  Fiscal Year 1991-1992 June 1, 1991 - May 31, 1992  
 
  Introduction
 

You can read this report in its original form here.

 
  Income
  MAPS' total income in FY 91-92 was $28,859.55.
 
  Expenses
  MAPS' total expenditures in FY 91-92 were $28,783.62.
 
  Assets
  Balance on May 31,1992 was $897.45.
 
  Comparative results
 

The following categories had no expenditures this fiscal year. Public Relations/Ads, Salaries, Grants, DEA Hearings, MDMA Animal Studies, MDMA Human Studies at Stanford, Johns Hopkins, Yale and in Switzerland, and Medical Marijuana.

* This loan was a no-interest loan made primarily to cover the expenses of the Swiss Conference. The expenses paid for by the loan are largely reflected in last yearns Swiss Conference expenditures of $26,600. Outstanding debt from FY91-92 is a no-interest loan from Rick Doblin made on 4/13/92 in the amount of $400.

Please note, the finandal statement does not reflect a great deal of time donated by Gary Bravo, Charles Grob, Jim McQuade and numerous others in the preparation of the MDMA protocol, by a dedicated graphic designer to the MAPS newsletter, as well as many other volunteers.

As you can see, MAPS has operated on a lean budget this year. The year's primary project has been to secure FDA approval for MDMA research. Everyone who worked on this project donated their time for free and as President, I have taken no salary. Now that we have secured permission to conduct MDMA research, however, the work takes on the nature of a full-time job. People will need to make greater time commitments to the project and will need financial assistance.

I will be taking a leave of absence from the Ph.D. program in Public Policy at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government to work full time on MAPS. At the last MAPS Board of Directors meeting, I received authorization for a salary of up to $1,000 a month, an amount I hope your contributions will support.

At this time, I am guessing that MAPS will need to raise $120,000 or so to conduct three MDMA research projects. These include two experiments in the US directed by Dr. Charles Grob, one with healthy volunteers and the other with pancreatic cancer patients, and one study in Russia (for which we hope to receive permission soon) to be directed by Dr. Krupitsky using alcoholics as subjects. I will prepare more exact cost estimates after we finalize the protocols, hopefully by October. While I will also seek foundation and government funding, I am less than optimistic at this time. Just giving us permission is a fantastic step forward for the government. I think we will be expected to have proved ourselves worthy by generating solid data before we can expect significant outside funding or government grants. Your financial support, therefore, is decisive. And just think, isn't it much easier to donate money for MDMA research rather than spinal fluid, which is what I have asked for in the past?


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1 in 7 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans suffer from PTSD, in many cases leading to suicide. We owe it to our veterans to stop this epidemic.

Tell the Pentagon to fund MAPS' groundbreaking work to treat PTSD.